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Tom B
03-17-2007, 03:01 AM
Aside from Optima or Ultima or whatever, are there any reliable six volt sealed or low maintenance batteries available? I'm tired of cleaning and repainting steel parts in my engine room. The batteries I get seem to bubble acid. (even when the car sits for three months.}

Three months to South Bend!

[img=left]http://www.alink.com/personal/tbredehoft/Bothcars.jpg[/img=left]
Tom Bredehoft
'53 Commander Coupe
'60 Lark VI
'05 Legacy Ltd Wagon
All three Indiana built OD cars

RHO
03-17-2007, 09:43 AM
I sometimes acquire my 6 Volt batteries at CarQuest and have had no problem with those I've used. I don't check the water but every few months and they last 2-3 years.

'55 Commander
'55 President

Dick Steinkamp
03-17-2007, 09:53 AM
Here's what I would do...

http://www.batteriesareus.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&products_id=83

http://thenobot.org/images/s2d/s2d_01.jpg

curt
03-17-2007, 09:54 AM
Could you put a rubber container under the battery. It loooks like a shoe box lid, I would think this would solve the problem.

N8N
03-17-2007, 10:39 AM
yup, I would use a plastic tray and a "battery mat" to soak up the acid, also check the output voltage of your generator, make sure it is not overcharging, should only be about 7.2 volts MAX or you will get the boil 'n' bubble effect.

good luck

nate

--
55 Commander Starlight
http://members.cox.net/njnagel

Tom B
03-17-2007, 11:12 AM
The bubbles burst, spraying the whole side of the compartment. I have the 'battery mat', the battery is three years old, I've never had to add any water.

Dick, I LOVE your suggestion. It even appears to be a 'tar top.'

Thanks Guys.

[img=left]http://www.alink.com/personal/tbredehoft/Bothcars.jpg[/img=left]
Tom Bredehoft
'53 Commander Coupe
'60 Lark VI
'05 Legacy Ltd Wagon
All three Indiana built OD cars

StudeRich
03-17-2007, 11:33 AM
That IS a really neat looking fake "OLD" battery, I like it. But there is only one problem, I read the detail and it says it's a Group 2, Studes use a Group 1. That one is a Ford Batt. with is longer and requires the box to be cut and extended and might look a bit "wrong".


quote:Originally posted by Tom B

Dick, I LOVE your suggestion. It even appears to be a 'tar top.


StudeRich
Studebakers Northwest
Ferndale, WA

Chris Pile
03-17-2007, 12:30 PM
quote:Originally posted by StudeRich

That IS a really neat looking fake "OLD" battery, I like it. But there is only one problem, I read the detail and it says it's a Group 2, Studes use a Group 1. That one is a Ford Batt. with is longer and requires the box to be cut and extended and might look a bit "wrong".

Please explain the terms for Group 1 and 2 - by the way, I used an Optima and thought it was great. Never had a starting problem once I bought it.

Chris Pile
The Studebaker Special
Midway Chapter SDC

Blue 15G
03-17-2007, 03:07 PM
Groups 1 and 2 just refer to the physical size of the 6 volt battery. A typical 6 volt equipped Stude has a battery holder that only a Group 1 will fit into. But a tractor supply store or good FLAPS should be able to get a Group 1, 6 volt battery for you with a high cranking amp. rating.

Also, I totally agree with the other poster about getting your voltage regulator checked. A malfunction in it can be the cause of the bubbling and acid spray. In fact, there shouldn't be acid spray of the amount you are observing, unless there IS a problem with the charging system.

Tom B
03-17-2007, 05:51 PM
Three years ago I replaced a battery that wouldn't hold a charge with the one I have now. At that time the entire system was checked for good charging and regulating. That battery dribbled out of the top. It was replaced in six months with no charge. The new one spits, not as bad ad drooling, but not good. The system was re checked at this time. I like the idea of the Optima, will get one. It will fit (on a diagonal) in my No. 1 battery box, the other dummy tar top won't fit.

I'd think over charging was a problem, too, but it continues with the battery out of the car. When I took it out last week I wiped it dry. Its wet now. And yes, it is out of the weather.

I was hoping there was a series one sealed 6 volt battery. It doesn't seem so.

[img=left]http://www.alink.com/personal/tbredehoft/Bothcars.jpg[/img=left]
Tom Bredehoft
'53 Commander Coupe
'60 Lark VI
'05 Legacy Ltd Wagon
All three Indiana built OD cars

rockne10
03-17-2007, 07:45 PM
I've been getting group 1 from Interstate for years and had no problem.

raprice
03-17-2007, 08:09 PM
The Interstates are good.
You also might try Pep Boys and Autozone.
Rog

'59 Lark VI Regal Hardtop

John Kirchhoff
03-17-2007, 09:25 PM
When it comes to batteries getting wet on top, that's pretty much a given unless you look at something like a motorcycle battery which has sealed caps and a vent tube that exits elsewhere. Anytime a battery is charged, hydrogen and oxygen gas is formed as water breaks down and this gas has a tendency to carry sulfuric acid along with it. Slow trickle charges carry the least while fast, high amperage charges carry the most. When charging, the gas must have some place to go. Old batteries had holes in the caps and many "no maintenance" batteries may have flat tops but aren't even close to being totally sealed. I've pried the tops off of many of them to refill with water or check the specific gravity. The only reason they're considered no maintenance is because they contain enough extra electrolyte that they normally don't run dry during their expected life. The so called sealed batteries are usually nothing more than a ordinary battery with extra air space and recessed filler holes that happen to have a sticker pasted over the top. Peel that sticker off and they're just like any other battery except they usually don't vent much gas. The batteries that vent the greatest amount of gas are those small sized batteries with high cranking amps. They get their high capacity by stuffing more plate area into the cell which leaves less room for electrolyte. Motorcycle batteries are probably the worst in that regard and because of that, they go through a lot of water for their size. At the opposite end of the spectrum are large ag, over the road or industrial batteries, the ones several feet long and weighing 80 pounds or so. They have a lot more electrolyte for the amount of plate area than auto batteries and usually don't loose as much water unless they go through a lot of deep discharge-charge cycles or are being overcharged. When the average auto battery is covered with the barely perceptable acid vapor layer, they loose about .1 volt and something like 1% of their total charge per month. If your battery vents a lot of gas, make sure you're not overcharging it and you don't have the cells fill too high. Consider your driving habits also. If you have a generator and do a lot of in town, low speed high electrical load driving before getting on the highway, the generator is going to have to do a lot of charging to replace the lost charge. If you fire it up in the morning and immediately get onto the open road, the battery won't need much recharging and is going to vent a lot less gas. To keep things clean about all you can do is to regularly remove the battery, wash the outside with a mixture of baking soda and water to neutralize the acid and rinse it off with a hose. Just try to keep the soda water from getting into the cells. The only other thing is use a totally sealed battery. Take a look to make sure they really are totally sealed though. Just because they have a plastic sticker pasted over the top doesn't always mean they are, look at each end near the center top of the battery and you might find a small rectangular vent hole. If so, they'll vent gas as well. They make motorcycle batteries with gel electrolyte but they're pricey and I don't know if they make larger one in that manner.

53k
03-18-2007, 08:21 AM
quote:Originally posted by Tom B

Aside from Optima or Ultima or whatever, are there any reliable six volt sealed or low maintenance batteries available? I'm tired of cleaning and repainting steel parts in my engine room. The batteries I get seem to bubble acid. (even when the car sits for three months.}
I have bought my six-volt batteries from a local battery warehouse- they are usually fresher than ones sitting around in a parts store. I have realized much longer life and much less contamination by keeping a battery maintenance charger on the battery when the car sits. This IS NOT a trickle charger, but one that keeps the battery topped off (charges then shuts off completely and just monitors the battery charge). A few days ago I went down to the cold barn and started my '53 Commander to move it. It hadn't been run for a couple months, but it cranked easily. This was with a five year old battery (and it had been allowed to go completely dead one time when the charger got accidentally unplugged- the maintanance charger brought it back in a few days of slow charging).


[img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/R-4.JPG[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/64L.JPG[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/64P.jpg[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/53K.jpg[/img=right]Paul Johnson
'53 Commander Starliner (since 1966)
'64 Daytona Wagonaire (original owner)
'64 Daytona Convertible (2006)
Museum R-4 engine

John Kirchhoff
03-18-2007, 12:00 PM
I need to correct something I put in my earlier post, a battery will loose about 1% of it's charge per DAY, not month. Let's see, per month...gee, at that rate a battery could go dead in something like 8 years! Ha! Sorry for not paying more attention, I should have proofread it better before I sent it. That's why using the maintenance charger like 53k uses is a wise idea for vehicles that set around a lot. That's also why motorcycles with digital clocks and fuel injection need a new battery every spring if they aren't ridden, kept on a charger or the battery cable disconnected. They set all winter while the clock and computer memory keep using juice from a rather small battery. By spring the discharged plates have all sulfated and you have a dead battery that won't take a charge.

64V-K7
03-18-2007, 12:24 PM
The one I just got from Napa was a USRM-1, It's a deep cycle type that was said to be around 99 amp hour. How does that rate?

Bob Johnstone
http://www.studebaker-info.org/7168422/sig2.jpg

John Kirchhoff
03-18-2007, 09:51 PM
True "deep cycle" batteries are usually used on such things as trolling motors and electric fence chargers that draw realitively low amps for long continous periods. The advantage they have over auto batteries is that they can be discharged till dead and charged back up fully repeatedly without damage. Auto batteries don't go for that foolishness and die a premature death in short order when doing so. However, auto batteries are able to provide a bigger "kick" when used on something like a car starter that requires lots of amps for short periods. Most deep cycle batteries meant for the trolling motor type uses don't use posts but have terminals made for attaching cables with bolts like a lawn mower battery.

Tom B
03-19-2007, 02:31 AM
Thanks for more battery information that I can use in this lifetime. What I'm going to do is;

Get a 6 volt Ultima battery, mount it diagonally in my series 1 case (it will fit with room to spare) and build a dummy tar top battery around it from scavenged (non battery) materials. With any luck no one will even notice it at South Bend. No, I'm not having my car judged, too many improvements.

[img=left]http://www.alink.com/personal/tbredehoft/Bothcars.jpg[/img=left]
Tom Bredehoft
'53 Commander Coupe
'60 Lark VI
'05 Legacy Ltd Wagon
All three Indiana built OD cars

hank63
03-19-2007, 06:32 AM
Deep cycle batteries also take a lot longer to charge. Car batteries are supposed to be "start cycle".
/H

John Kirchhoff
03-19-2007, 08:12 AM
Great idea, Tom! That way you get the best of both worlds and if anyone says anything about it, tell them you'll give them a jump start when theirs won't crank. I'd like to see your dummy when you get it made.

Tom B
03-26-2007, 04:51 PM
John, you'll have to find it by yourself at South Bend.

I received my Red Top 6 volt Optima battery today and YES it does fit diagonally in a Group 1 battery case. Now to cobble together the 'shroud.'

[img=left]http://www.alink.com/personal/tbredehoft/Bothcars.jpg[/img=left]
Tom Bredehoft
'53 Commander Coupe
'60 Lark VI
'05 Legacy Ltd Wagon
All three Indiana built OD cars

64V-K7
03-26-2007, 05:57 PM
I have to let on what happened here. Initially, I didn't have the original battery available, so I went over and at the counter-bot's advise, took the Deep cycle battery (Interstate USRM-1). He said it was the same or better than an auto battery. There was NO information on the battery as to CA or CCA.
So, I emailed Interstate about it and they replied the USRM-1 was suitable for my application, as the USRM-1 has 99 amp/hrs. They didn't elaborate on the CA or CCA as I requested.

After seeing what was discussed here, I went to the Interstate website and it shows two distinct batteries, the USRM-1 (Deep cycle) and a 1-VHD (Auto battery), the 1-VHD having more plates, etc than the Marine type. It doesn't show a CA or CCA for marine batteries, but the VHD had 720 CCA.
Went back to the NAPA place on Friday and the NAPA-bot says that "Interstate says they're the same battery". (Physically they are alike)
Went home and emailed Interstate again about the information on their website.
Now, it's Monday and no email from Interstate... So, I got the old battery out of the car and guess what. It was a 1-VHD, so I took it and a printout of the Interstate site, back to NAPA this AM.
I said that I wanted to return it, etc and guess what. They had a 1-VHD on the shelf, which I took home. Right to the end, they claimed I had bad information.

If I didn't care about maintaining relations with the place, I would have told them to shove it and gone up to Carquest..

Bob Johnstone
http://www.studebaker-info.org/7168422/sig2.jpg

53k
03-26-2007, 07:53 PM
quote:... If I didn't care about maintaining relations with the place, I would have told them to shove it and gone up to Carquest..

Exactly why I buy all my batteries at the local battery warehouse- they know their product.


[img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/R-4.JPG[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/64L.JPG[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/64P.jpg[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/53K.jpg[/img=right]Paul Johnson
'53 Commander Starliner (since 1966)
'64 Daytona Wagonaire (original owner)
'64 Daytona Convertible (2006)
Museum R-4 engine