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View Full Version : Paint & prep suggestions for door/window molding?



Eman
02-05-2006, 10:31 PM
I took off my metal door moldings (wraps around the side and vent windows) today. One of them has got small spots of rust coming through the painted side. What's the best way to get this smoothed, cleaned, treated and painted? And what type and where can I find that gunmetal color paint?

And as long as I've got them off, I was going to replace the broken vent glass in one. Someone told me to remove the vent window from the molding because it would be easier to hammer in the new glass. But my manual says if I want to remove the vent window, I need to drill out or cut off the rivet in the vent frame where it pivots. Is that really necessary?

Here's a picture of the assembly (although the other side of this molding is the one I need to paint):
http://www.bulletshots.net/myStude/miscWork/images/IMG_0306.jpg



1951 Commander Starlight Coupe (aka "Stella")
www.bulletshots.net
www.bulletshots.net/blog

Roscomacaw
02-06-2006, 12:30 AM
Yes, it's necessary to drill out that rivet. Use an oval head screw and a self-locking nut to go back together with it.

No one has that color of paint ready-mixed, BTW.

Miscreant at large.

1957 Transtar 1/2ton
1960 Larkvertible V8
1958 Provincial wagon
1953 Commander coupe
1957 President 2-dr
1955 President State
1951 Champion Biz cpe
1963 Daytona project FS

garyash
02-06-2006, 09:11 AM
You can buy the small, tubular steel rivets at the hardware store, usually 5/32" x 1/4" long or 3/16"x 3/8" long. The smaller originals were 9/64" diameter, but I don't think they make them any more. The trick is to set them!

While you are at the hardware store, buy a half dozen bearing balls just a little larger in diameter than shaft of the rivet and some washers that fit over the rivets. When you are ready to assemble, push the rivet in place, place a washer over the shaft, put a ball on the tubular end of the rivet, and gently squeeze the ball down with a pair of ViseGrips until the end of the rivet spreads a little. Remove the ball, be sure the washer and rivet head are seated as well as possible, then use the ViseGrips to squeeze the rivet down tight. It works great as long as the rivet isn't too long for the job.

Of course, you will notice that it is easy for the ball to go flying away, which is why you bought six of them. A little putty or some other sticky stuff helps to hold them in place until you squeeze. It's also easier if two people are there to hold and align all of the parts.

Gary Ash
Dartmouth, MA
'48 M5
'65 Wagonaire Commander
'63 Wagonaire Standard
www.studegarage.com

studegary
02-06-2006, 01:50 PM
Gary A. - I haven't tried it, yet, but wouldn't it be easier to use something like a brake lining rivet tool to set the rivets. I have the tool, but haven't had a need to set other than brake lining rivets with it.

Roscomacaw
02-06-2006, 03:12 PM
I'd like to know what hardware store Gary goes to! Out here we have some pretty fine hardware stores. Since this area is heavy with farming industry, there's lots of needs for all sorts of hardware pieces. But I'll be damned if I coulf find a source of hollow rivets anywhere. And I looked.
Yes, I'm sure they can be found from some cyber-supplier - but not any hardware store I know of. Nothing but pop rivets to be had. Nothing.[V]
In trying my best to redo the vent window divider runs on this 58 wagon, I travelled far and wide in search of what I needed. It's like I was asking for parts to fix my typewriter![xx(]

On my Transtar (I know - it ain't "original") I used an appropriate-sized stainless steel, oval head screw and an NAS aluminum, self-locking nut to secure it with. Works fine - lasts a long time and I don't hafta risk damaging something should it have to be disassembled again, somewhere's down the road.Contraty to what you might envision, it does not scream out at you: "HEY LOOK! I'M MODIFIED!!!" :D;)
And you don't need to round up the proper sets or learn how to use them in tight quarters.:)

Miscreant at large.

Who's riveting skills never brought down
any of the airplanes he worked on.

1957 Transtar 1/2ton
1960 Larkvertible V8
1958 Provincial wagon
1953 Commander coupe
1957 President 2-dr
1955 President State
1951 Champion Biz cpe
1963 Daytona project FS

garyash
02-06-2006, 04:20 PM
Studegary - yes, a proper rivet set would work. However, when you are struggling to hold the window garnish molding, the window hinge, a hammer, and a rivet set, and get the rivet head seated on something heavy and immovable, it's a real juggling act. I tried that for a couple of days before I worked out the ViseGrip trick.

Mr. Biggs - the rivets are there someplace! Try one of those stores that has racks with lots of the little trays that pull out. My local True Value store must have 300-500 of those trays for strange screws, electrical bits, etc. They might be with eyelets and snaps, etc. I found them in steel, brass, and copper. But, sadly you are correct about them being hard to find. Home Depot comes to town, drives all the little hardware stores out of business, then discontinues carrying small hardware because its expensive RIGID and RYOBI brand junk tools bring in most $/square foot. The local Sears Hardware stores also dropped much of the small hardware. [rant, rant!]

Big Flats Rivet Co. has almost all the rivets you'll ever need. See http://www.bigflatsrivet.com/

Actually, it wouldn't surprise me that Dennis Lambert is sitting on a couple hundred pounds of them. There are lots of (unmarked) bins in the back that they sell for $1/lb or something, but even Dennis doesn't know the part numbers. Dave Spilski sometimes can find things like that. I just pulled out the '49-'56 truck parts catalog, and sure enough the rivets for the windows are there, but not all part numbers! They are in my M5 parts book - with illustrations! The rivet that the top hinge pivots on is 9/64" dia. x 17/64" long, part 265879W for both M and R trucks. Cars may be similar.
Upper pivot to garnish molding: 9/64" x 3/16" long, p/n 419-096
Upper pivot to ventilator frame: 9/64" x 1/4" long, p/n 268503
Lower pivot to ventilator frame: 3/16" dia. x 5/16" long, p/n 281913
Vent lock bracket to garnish molding: 9/64" x 3/16", p/n 419-096

Here are some of the small ones I've acquired over the last couple of years from various sources. There are a few bearing balls in the picture, too. Where's Waldo?
http://www.studegarage.com/images/other/rivets_small.jpg

Gary Ash
Dartmouth, MA
'48 M5
'65 Wagonaire Commander
'63 Wagonaire Standard
www.studegarage.com

rocinante
02-09-2006, 05:37 PM
I can second Gary's comments about SASCO - they have tons and tons of all kinds of hardware including, IIRC, several types of hollow rivets. As Gary stated they don't know all the part numbers of the fasteners and misc hardware they have, but it's worth it to do some digging next time you are in South Bend. If you can't make it to South Bend you might be able to get Dave (or George) to do the digging for you if you give him very specific info. I know he would prefer to search with part numbers but he is a good Studebaker guy and if you get him on a slow day who knows....

BTW Dave once told me that some of the hardware they have back there is AMC. [:0]

Charles Schneider
Raynham MA

'53 Champion Starlight Coupe
'60 Lark VIII
'50 2R5

rockne10
02-09-2006, 09:04 PM
I've had great success putting these back together using...brake lining rivets, an anvil and a steel punch. It takes a little coordination but is easily accomplished. I like the idea about using the vice grip and ball bearing but that might take more coordination than I've got.:D

To get the closest match for the paint on your garnish molding I would suggest taking the glove box door to your local auto paint supplier. They should be able to scan the paint to give you the closest possible modern formula, which may then need some flattener added to reduce the gloss.

Eman
02-09-2006, 11:14 PM
Thanks for the responses guys. I may try to just replace the glass without removing the vent frame for now. Hmmm, on to finding an auto paint supplier.[:o)]


1951 Commander Starlight Coupe (aka "Stella")
www.bulletshots.net
www.bulletshots.net/blog