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pete
03-12-2007, 10:49 PM
how often do you need to check axle endplay and what if you dont what happens if its out of wack what damage can it do if its not right ive got how to repair off the stude tech pages thks pete nz

gordr
03-13-2007, 12:07 PM
Pete:I'd check it whenever I begin driving a "new" Stude, and thereafter whenever into the rear brakes or rear wheel bearings for any reason.
If the endplay is allowed to become excessive, rear wheel bearings could fail. The rear wheel bearings are grease-packed, and are best done by hand, same as the front; so if you haven't had them out and re-packed them, do so, and do the axle end-play setting at that time. If you also renew your rear brake shoes and cylinders at that time, you can expect to get many years' trouble-free service from the rear axles.

Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

ROADRACELARK
03-15-2007, 11:42 AM
Pete/Gord,
Yes, the axle end play is important. If you are not going to replace the axle bearings AND races, by all means clean and inspect. If the bearings/races look ok (no evedience of pitting or brindeling)repack them and reinstall. I would suggest you leave the current end play shims as they are. In my past experience, I have reset the end play to factory specs. only to create a bearing noise or vibration that was NOT previously there![B)] Looked elsewhere for another problem, only to find out when I returned the axle to its original end play, the noise/vibration disappeard!:) Yes, the original setting was loose, BUT, it had been run that way from new without any trouble. By changing the end play, the bearing began to run in a different area on the race creating noise/vibration. I was in there to replace seals, check bearing condition, ..bearings looked great, repacked and said "might as well do it right and set the end play while I'm here" WRONG![xx(]If you're installing new bearings, absolutely set to specs. I've always been told a loose tapered bearing will not wear out as fast as one set too tight..too much preload. OBTW, factory specs. say clean and repack every 25K miles, I don't think end play adjustment is required. Just offering help from past experience.:)

Dan Miller
Atlanta, GA

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Road Racers turn left AND right.

N8N
03-15-2007, 01:47 PM
I really like the grease fitting holes in the earlier rear ends for packing the rear wheel bearings. I suspect that that does a better job of packing than doing it by hand. My grease gun is loaded with Mobil 1 synthetic so I only "stock" one kind of grease; I use it on chassis fittings and also bearings.

nate

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55 Commander Starlight
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ROADRACELARK
03-15-2007, 05:25 PM
Nate,
I agree, it sure is convinent...but not without some questions. 1. How do you know for sure the bearing will get thoroughly greased and how many "shots" with the grease gun does it take to acheive that. Unlike other grease fittings that you can see the old grease being purged from the assembly, ie. u-joints, tie rod ends, king pins, trunions etc., this you can't. Excess grease can easily pass the felt dust seal out onto the brakes, or past the axle seal and mix
with the diff lube. It makes one wonder why Spicer/Studebaker stopped using these plugs. It sure beats pulling the axles every 25K miles.[xx(] I bet they had too many rear brake failures from the gas station ("service" station back then;)) jockeys pumping too much grease in the fittings that were installed. They never saw any coming out anywhere so just give her a couple more pumps.:( It wouldn't take many times considering the chassis lube was at 1K intervals.[:0] Not complaining, mind you, just food for thought.:)

Dan Miller
Atlanta, GA



[img=left]http://static.flickr.com/57/228744729_7aff5f0118_m.jpg[/img=left]
Road Racers turn left AND right.

N8N
03-15-2007, 05:36 PM
At least on my '55 (before I swapped the rear for a TT unit) not only was there a hole for the zerk fitting, but there was also a small (3/32"? or even smaller?) hole drilled in the axle housing at the very top. So once the bearing was full, you'd have a little "worm" of grease coming out of the axle. I've had the rear drums off more times than I care to count, and can't say that I noticed any grease seeping past the seals.

Of course, in service, how many people (esp. jiffy-lube type places) would bother to wipe off the axle housing after greasing? It's easy to imagine a buildup of greasy dirt plugging that little hole and causing exactly the effect you describe. Every rear I've installed has taken several hours of wire brushing, oven cleaner, etc. to get down to something paintable; but for some reason they never seem to be badly rusted.

nate

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55 Commander Starlight
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wagone
03-16-2007, 10:27 AM
My Dana 44 had a HUGE amount of end play and I've gotten suggested reasons from J. Pepper of the TW Co-operator advice column. My bearings did not fail (although excess end play could CERTAINLY lead to that) so the design must include a SIGNIFICANT safety margin. My end play had to have been well over 1/16 inch, but the bearings looked OK--but I replaced them because I had serious concern over the fact that my end play was so great. On the face of it a zerk on the housing to lube the bearing seems an excellent solution, but as others have said that isn't such a hot idea unless one is very careful not to overdo it and then how do you know that you've gotten any grease in there and what about the old grease that never is cleaned out. Bearing failure on a trip to a national meeting or anywhere else is certainly not my idea of fun and breaking an axle (tapered?) is even less entertaining (it has been a fairly common occurrence on those tapered shafts) although I've yet to experience it. I think we should all invest in those "new" flanged axles and I wonder if a run on them would lower the price or raise it.

wagone and the old R2 Avanti