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Eman
11-18-2005, 08:50 AM
Just making sure before I change the fluids and all...

Coolant: 17.25 quarts
Transmission fluid: 3 pints
Oil: 6 quarts
Rear axle: 3 pints
Brake fluid: 1/2" from the top of M/C after bleeding?

What I don't think I'm reading it right is on the 2nd page of the Lubrication section of my manual. Under Transmission Capacities, it says Commander with Overdrive is 3 pints of fluid, but then says below that for a Commander with Automatic Drive is 9-1/2 quarts of fluid? Is the first amount just for a stick shift? That's a big jump from 3 pints to 9-1/2 quarts... I just want to be sure.

Am I forgetting anything else?

1951 Commander Starlight Coupe (aka "Stella")
www.bulletshots.net

Roscomacaw
11-18-2005, 12:29 PM
Yes, the first is for standard shift, Eman.;) And if you have such with overdrive, the aft section gets topped off seperatly from the front section. One does not flow into the other. That's why there's two drain plugs and two fill plugs.

Have you greased everything??? Don't overlook the one grease zerk that pokes out of the rear edge of that front crossmember.;) That greases the center-point bellcrank of the steering.
There's even grease zerks for the shift levers at the base of the column and for the pedal pivot points under the floorboard. Zerks at either side of the cross-shaft in the bellhousing, Zerks on the U-joints in the driveshaft, kingpins, knuckles and steering linkages.
There's also little oiler ports on the ends of the generator and for the base of the distributor.[:p]

Miscreant at large.

1957 Transtar 1/2ton
1960 Larkvertible V8
1958 Provincial wagon
1953 Commander coupe
1957 President 2-dr
1955 President State
1951 Champion Biz cpe
1963 Daytona project FS

Eman
11-18-2005, 09:16 PM
Thanks Mr. Biggs.:)

And as long as I make one of these choices for each, I think I should be good to go...

Transmission fluid: Dexron III or Type F
Oil: Rotella 15W-40 (Should I take the Quaker State 10W-30 back?)
Brake fluid: Dot5 or heavy duty Dot3
Coolant: Straight antifreeze or 50/50 mix
Rear axle lubricant: Saw 85W-140GL5 tonight at WalMart. That ok?

I still need to check/replace that oil pressure hose (feeding into the gage) like you suggested too... If I can find the location and part number.

Roscomacaw
11-18-2005, 09:53 PM
So this car HAS an automatic trans? DexronIII will do fine. Just be sure you drain the torque convertor too! If you take that plate off the bottom of the bell housing and work the torque convertor around, you'll find a metal plug. Unscrew it and have a drain pan ready. It drains seperate from the main body of the tranny.

I personally wouldn't put that rotella in there. Use the QS

Go with the DOT 3

NEVER straight anti-freeze! Always a mix.

The GL5 will be fine.:D

Miscreant at large.

1957 Transtar 1/2ton
1960 Larkvertible V8
1958 Provincial wagon
1953 Commander coupe
1957 President 2-dr
1955 President State
1951 Champion Biz cpe
1963 Daytona project FS

hank63
11-20-2005, 11:57 AM
Anti-freeze should be mixed with the water at a certain ratio. You check the freezing point of your mixture to see if you have the right mix. As I recall, it was done with an optical instrument. At any rate, you need a coolant freezing point lower than your winter temp's because of the "wind-chill" factor.
/H

whacker
11-20-2005, 12:16 PM
Here in the rust belt, we need to check antifreeze carefully. You can buy a tester at your local FLAPS to check it. A specific gravity guage, has a bunch of little pellets in a bulb-type syringe. You suck the mixture up into the dropper and the number of pellets that float to the top will tell you the freeze resistance of your antifreeze mix. Doesn't cost much - cheaper than a cracked block!

Transtar56
11-20-2005, 12:23 PM
Do you know how to make aunti-freeze ?
Just take away her nighty.
OK,Ill go away now.

studegary
11-20-2005, 01:49 PM
quote:Originally posted by hank63

Anti-freeze should be mixed with the water at a certain ratio. You check the freezing point of your mixture to see if you have the right mix. As I recall, it was done with an optical instrument. At any rate, you need a coolant freezing point lower than your winter temp's because of the "wind-chill" factor.
/H


The "wind chill" factor has absolutely nothing to do with what anti-freeze mixture your car will need. Wind chill is evaporation from your skin causing your skin to believe the temperature is lower than it really is. There is no wind induced evaporation in your car's cooling system.
I believe that a 50%-50% mixture is good to use. I once bought a car with 100% anti-freeze. I just drained half out and refilled with water.

rockne10
11-20-2005, 07:06 PM
I agree; wind chill factor has no effect on radiator coolant. A 50/50 mix should protect to 20 or 30 below zero. Any mix stronger than that is counter productive and, in the summer, will adversely effect the boiling point.

KGlowacky
11-20-2005, 08:11 PM
Just to add to the Anti Freeze mixture. They sell both 100% and a 50/50 mix. If you buy the mix do not delute with water. I now live in Houston so it isn't an issue anymore but up in Ohio it did cause some problems for people who assumed they were buying 100% when infact it was the mix. I hope this helps.

hank63
11-22-2005, 09:53 AM
I just call it "wind chill factor". It caused me grief some years ago. Coolant was good for -20, outside dropped to -18. Started the car and drove off. Soon saw the temp gauge going for o/heat and had to stop (not much fun at -18, I can assure you). Turned out there was almost no coolant circulation from the closed thermostat, which allowed the radiator to freeze up from the cold wind. When the thermostat opened, there was already an ice-plug in the rad. Fortunately, nothing cracked except my self-esteem. Once the car was mobile again, I purchased more anti-freeze. It came in -litre bottles. Trade name was glycol.
I was young and "green" and got help from a mechanic who explained the problem. From then on, I always made sure of the coolant temp withstand. I don't need anti-freeze where I live nowadays, but I still refuse to buy ready-mixed coolant. I buy inhibitor as a concentrate and add to the coolant. A lot cheaper that way.
/ H

curt
11-22-2005, 11:52 AM
When it gets into subzero temperatures I block off some of the radiator with a cardboard cover. Yes,I know if the thermostat is working proper the enging will run at aproporate temperature. But it sure helps keeping the engine compartment warmer and the generator works at,say, 60 degrees as aposed to -20 degrees. I think the generator was designed to run in warm to hot suroundings. Once at -26 I covered 100 % of the radiator and drove interstate roads all day, car never overheated and I was warm inside the car. However, I did remove the cardboard when I went through St. Louis at rush hour.

Roscomacaw
11-22-2005, 12:46 PM
Hah! Curt I did that with my old Champ truck in December of '81. I was leaving Little Rock AR, and it was -something degrees as I recall. I got a piece of carboard and blocked off ALL of the radiator so I could get some warmth out of the heater![V] Drove on the interstate for hours without a problem, althought I did tear away enough cardboard to expose about a 1/4th of the rad's surface as the day warmed up a bit. Didn't stop that trek until I hit Phoenix!:D

Miscreant at large.

1957 Transtar 1/2ton
1960 Larkvertible V8
1958 Provincial wagon
1953 Commander coupe
1957 President 2-dr
1955 President State
1951 Champion Biz cpe
1963 Daytona project FS