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LarkMark
10-30-2005, 11:17 PM
My 63 Lark likes oil. You can tell where it's been by following the blue smoke trail.

I just fixed the valve stem seals over the weekend, which seems to have eliminated most of the blue smoke. Also, the 6 cylinder engine has a PCV valve that was totally plugged which might have helped cause the trouble. The car spewed blue smoke whenever I started it, whenever I was going down a long hill, and at speeds over 55 MPH. Number 2 and number 5 sparks plugs were black. The others looked good (nice and white to slightly grey.

I haven't driven the car far enough (or fast enough) yet to see if the oil consumption is good now, but it sure looks better around town.

The other thing I'm wondering about is the oil pressure. The gauge reads 70 pounds at speed. About the lowest it reads is about 40 pounds at idle when it's hot. After it's been running all day, the maximum pressure is down around 60 to 65 pounds according to the gauge in the car. This seems high to me. The manual (on CD) says the pressure should be around 40psi and talks about an oil pressure relief spring that should be check anually. I could not figure out where that spring is located, however, so I can check it. Can somebody explain where it's at??

thanks!


MARC
Punxsutawney, PA

curt
10-31-2005, 07:58 AM
How is the Wood Chuck today? The relief valve is on the blocks R side below and foward of the # 2 cylinder. It looks like a one inch bolt-head. To get the plunger out I used a wood dowel sanded so it just sliped into the plunger after the spring was removed.I worked this gently back & forth, I also used carb cleaner in the hole to help loosen the plunger. I'm sure others will have advice.

DEEPNHOCK
10-31-2005, 11:47 AM
Sounds like you have a handle on it.
Take Curts' advice and 'service' the oil pressure relief valve (per the good book). Your psi sounds fine. Worn guides and bad seals will make it smoke like you describe, especially when going downhill coasting (when your intake manifold vacuum is at it's highest). Replacing the PCV valve is cheap insurance.
Also try to run a low ash oil. Some brands of oil smoke less than others, and leave less deposits inside. Shell Rotella diesel oil comes to mind.
Best thing you can do for your Stude is change the oil (and filter, if you have one) and drive it...a lot. When you do go for a drive, make sure it is a good, long drive. Getting the engine fully warmed up and getting the exhaust system hot (and dried out) will make your Stude a happy camper....
Jeff[8D]


quote:Originally posted by LarkMark

My 63 Lark likes oil. You can tell where it's been by following the blue smoke trail.

I just fixed the valve stem seals over the weekend, which seems to have eliminated most of the blue smoke. Also, the 6 cylinder engine has a PCV valve that was totally plugged which might have helped cause the trouble. The car spewed blue smoke whenever I started it, whenever I was going down a long hill, and at speeds over 55 MPH. Number 2 and number 5 sparks plugs were black. The others looked good (nice and white to slightly grey.

I haven't driven the car far enough (or fast enough) yet to see if the oil consumption is good now, but it sure looks better around town.

The other thing I'm wondering about is the oil pressure. The gauge reads 70 pounds at speed. About the lowest it reads is about 40 pounds at idle when it's hot. After it's been running all day, the maximum pressure is down around 60 to 65 pounds according to the gauge in the car. This seems high to me. The manual (on CD) says the pressure should be around 40psi and talks about an oil pressure relief spring that should be check anually. I could not figure out where that spring is located, however, so I can check it. Can somebody explain where it's at??

thanks!


MARC
Punxsutawney, PA


DEEPNHOCK at Cox.net
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Commander51
10-31-2005, 02:49 PM
When removing the valve assembly for service, to you first need to drain the oil from the engine, or can it be removed without draining??

Alan
10-31-2005, 03:22 PM
It can be removed with out draining.

Roscomacaw
10-31-2005, 07:25 PM
The big bolt and spring will come out pretty easily. The actual relief valve may not be so willing. You might have to devise a tool to extract it from it's bore.
I think your car's oil pressure is TOO high. What happens more than not is that the valve gets stuck in the closed position and can't bleed off the excess pressure. Of course, if some knothead stretched the spring or replaced it with something that "looked close", that would cause a problem. New springs are available and might be worth the small cost one'll set ya back.;)
Now that you've changed the seals, swap some of the gray-white plugs into # 2 & 5 cylinders and drive them a bit. If they don't get nasty-lookin', you've probably got your Blue Smoke problem licked![:0]:D

Miscreant at large.

1957 Transtar 1/2ton
1960 Larkvertible V8
1958 Provincial wagon
1953 Commander coupe
1957 President 2-dr
1955 President State
1951 Champion Biz cpe
1963 Daytona project FS

hank63
10-31-2005, 08:12 PM
How about a dry + a wet compression test? It's quick and cheap and sometimes very revealing.
/H

LarkMark
10-31-2005, 08:35 PM
I finally found the oil pressure relief valve. It's on the front passenger side of the engine close to the front timing cover....in fact, I'll have to remove the timing cover bolt to get it out. It's under the motor mount and in front of the fuel pump in a bad spot to get at. So, I didn't do it yet (it's going to be a dirty job!). At least, that's where I think it is! I can't see it very well.

Somebody told me to load marvel mystery oil into the bad cylinders because I might have a stuck ring on #2 and #5.

I didn't do a compression test yet, but there doesn't seem to be any blow-by coming out the oil cap (in the valve cover).

MARC
Punxsutawney, PA

N8N
10-31-2005, 09:04 PM
If there's no perceptible blowby you probably don't have a stuck ring; but it wouldn't hurt to "decarbonize" the engine anyway.

NB: follow the procedure below at your own risk! No sane person or professional mechanic would recommend the following.

First, drive to your nearest convenience store in a "spirited" manner. Make sure the engine gets good and hot. If the nearest store is too close for that to happen, pick one farther away. Buy a 20 oz. drink. Drive home in a "spirited" manner as well. Take the now-empty soda bottle and fill with water. Remove air cleaner and while working the throttle with your hand slowly drizzle water into the carburetor. DO NOT LET THE ENGINE STALL. I can't emphasize how important that is, if you hydrolock the engine you probably will bend something fairly fundamental. (see "no sane person" above.) You will be blowing huge clouds of white smoke out the tailpipes, this is perfectly normal. You also may see glowing or black chunks coming out as well, this is all the carbon that used to be in your engine.

Once that's done, go for another drive. By the time you get home your chambers should be fairly clean. Fill the engine with MMO or ATF through the plug holes and let it sit for as long as you can do without the car. Then crank the engine over to pump it all out (assuming there's some left on the piston tops) reinstall the plugs and go for another drive. At this point you should probably change the oil as it will have all kinds of foulness in it, but if you had a stuck ring that was going to come loose without disassembling the engine, it'll now be loose.

good luck,

nate

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