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Eman
10-10-2005, 08:40 AM
I'm in the process of taking off my rear brakes ('51 Commander) to be replaced with larger ones. I've got the backing plates and shims off, but had a few remaining questions...

A) Sounds silly, but how do I get the emergency brake cable unhooked from the backing plate? Is there a clip I haven't found on it yet?

B) I need to repack the rear wheel bearings. Do I need the special tool (HM-931) to remove the spindles and bearings? A friend of mine thought I could just remove them by hand. And are the spindles actually a part of the axle shaft, so the whole shaft must be removed from the axle housing?

I think I need to take reading comprehension again! LOL


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Roscomacaw
10-10-2005, 11:55 AM
Pull the spring rearward on the cable and there should be a spring steel clip where the front end of that spring seats against the backing plate. You simply twist it to pull off said cable. Then the cable, housing and boot should be able to come out of the backing plate.

Yes, spindle/axle is one piece. Bearings are pressed in place ON the axle, so they come out too, with the axle. [^] The brake backing plate has to be off and that HM-931 is akin to a slide hammer that screws onto the end of the axle shaft. At this point, the only thing keeping the assy in the tube is the bearing race, which is, of course, a tight fit.
You could fudge that tool if you got a nut the size of the one that retains the drum and welded up a fixture to work with a slide hammer. OR, you can screw that axle nut back on and cautiously and judiciously tap on the inner edge of it with a ball peen hammer to nudge the axles out. [}:)] Use a piece of sheet metal to protect the axle threads as you tap with the hammer. You don't want to buggar those threads!

Put ALL those shims back where you found them, provided you don't change the bearings or their races. The shims all go on the righthand side. And DO NOT lubricate the axle tapers or the hub cones with anything when this all goes back together. They should be clean and dry!;)
Folks make the mistaken assumption that the key is what trasfers the power to the wheel. Not so! It's the adhesion of the cone to the taper that transfers the power. If it's slippery - well - bad news!

Miscreant at large.

1957 Transtar 1/2ton
1960 Larkvertible V8
1958 Provincial wagon
1953 Commander coupe
1957 President 2-dr
1955 President State
1951 Champion Biz cpe
1963 Daytona project FS

BRUCESTUDE
10-10-2005, 12:05 PM
THE ONLY WAY I'VE FOUND TO REMOVE THOSE EARLIER CABLES, IS TO CUT IT AT THE END, WHERE IT HOOKS INTO THE E-BRAKE ARM.I CUT ONLY ONE END, AND PULLED THE CABLE OUT FROM THE OTHER SIDE. WHEN RE-INSTALLED I BOUGHT NEW ALUMINUM OR COPPER CABLE STOPS (WITH THE APPROPRIATE INSIDE DIAMETER)AND FASTENED IT ON. THESE ARE INSTALLED BY SLIPPING ON THE CABLE END, THEN PRESSING IN A VISE OR HAMMER. THE ONE I INSTALLED HAS HELD UP GREAT. I TRIED READING THE BOOK 18 TIMES, AND EVEN MESSED WITH ANOTHER BACKING PLATE, AND GOT THE CABLE OUT, BUT THE STOP BROKE INSIDE THE TUBE???WHEN I CLEANED AND REPAINTED A SET OF B-PLATES ON ANOTHER CAR, I DID ALL THE WORK W/THE CABLE STILL CONNECTED.(IT MADE FOE A HANDY WAY TO HANG 'EM UP TO DRY).[:p]\
AS FOR THE AXLE BEARINGS; YOU HAVE TO PULL THE AXLE TO REMOVE AND REPACK THEM. TO REMOVE AXLE, REINSTALL A BRAKE DRUM, REPLACE THE AXLE NUT PARTWAY, THEN USE THE DRUM AS A SLIDE HAMMER TO PULL THE BEARING/SHAFT OUT.

rockne10
10-10-2005, 09:36 PM
YOU DO NOT NEED TO PULL THE AXLES!
There's a slotted plug in the axlehousing an inch or sofrom the backing plate. This can be replaced with a zerk fitting. There is also a 1/16" hole top center of housing and closer to backing plate to vent excess grease. Make certain that hole isn't plugged with dirt,hard grease or rust. Unless your bearings need replaced you do not need to pull the axles. The manual recommends you replace theplugs after greasing but I never have. I pack them every time I service the rest of the fittings,until clean grease comes out the weep holes.

Later cars had a clip that screwed on the backing plate to secure the brake cable through the plate. Yours is probably pressed in place. Mine were. That little tab can be knocked out to let the cable slide out of the plate.

BRUCESTUDE
10-11-2005, 12:07 PM
ACTUALLY, TO INSPECT AND THOROUGHLY PACK THE BEARINGS, THE AXLES DO NEED TO BE PULLED. BESIDES, WITH THE BACKING PLATES, ETC. OFF, IT'S EASY. ALSO A GOOD TIME TO REPLACE THE INNER AXLE SEAL.
AS FOR THE PLUG ON THE REAR AXLE, IT IS THERE TO ADD GREASE, NOT TO REPACK THE BEARINGS, THE SEALS WON'T HANDLE ALL THAT PRESSURE FROM THE GREASE GUN. IT IS HANDY FOR THOSE LUBE JOBS, THO![^]

Roscomacaw
10-11-2005, 01:37 PM
I agree with BRUCE on the greasing. Especially since this car's 54 years old and probably NEVER has had it's axles out or inner seals replaced. Besides that, there's some of these axles that don't have the place to install a zerk fitting. Fact is, that was the case with this '58 wagon I'm working on. No zerk ports in the axle tubes.[}:)]

ALSO - thru Bruce's inspiration - I went out back and dug out a '51 RA assy I had. I have to confess, after pulling a drum, I don't see how I could extract the cable without cutting the swedged ball off the end of it! [:0] This is contrary to what's described in the 1951 Shop Manual. My only defense is that it's been 10 years since I worked on Stude brakes of this vintage. Besides, the shop manual DID reaffirm my assumptions. So I and the manual were both wrong. Not a first for either of us![V]

The cable guide on the backside of the backing plate is welded to the plate, so it's not going anywhere. And the ID of that guide is only big enough to let the cable itself pass thru.
This would lead me to believe that on the assembly line, the cable and rear backing plates would have come as an assembly - EVEN THO the parts book doesn't support such a theory. OR - the little swedged ball is considered a seperate service part and gets cripmed on after the new cable's installed.[B)]

BTW, Eman, as long as you don't remove or replace the rear bearings, the shims should be OK to reuse without setting up the axle shaft end play. If you DO distrub or replace them tho - you'll have to do the re-establishing of the end play as spelled out in the manual.;)

Miscreant at large.

1957 Transtar 1/2ton
1960 Larkvertible V8
1958 Provincial wagon
1953 Commander coupe
1957 President 2-dr
1955 President State
1951 Champion Biz cpe
1963 Daytona project FS

Eman
10-11-2005, 05:08 PM
Well, at least I wasn't going crazy with the brake cable thing. Looks like I've got some fun ahead getting the axles out though. [xx(]

Thanks for the input everyone.


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Roscomacaw
10-11-2005, 05:56 PM
Those axles shouldn't be that much of a hassle, Eman. The hardened grease may inhibit their removal a bit, but I don't see a big fight on your hands.
Do it like I suggestd or as the other fella said, using the drum as a slide hammer, in essence.
If those bearings and races look OK, I'd reuse them myself. Just clean 'em up nice, repack them with a good grease and put er back together. (and think about those inner seals too - while you've got the shafts out!)The NAPA# for those inner seals is 49603 OR you could buy them from a Stude parts vendor.

Going back in should be fairly easy too. IF you had a "Twin Traction" axle (these weren't offered until '57 or so) you'd have to contend with a thrust button that sits in between the two axle ends, inside the Twin Traction clutch pack. That's a bit trickier but still do-able once you know how. The only reason I mention it is for the benefit of anyone who might be taking in this info for their own use and they not be aware of that thrust button if they're working with a TT rear.;)

Miscreant at large.

1957 Transtar 1/2ton
1960 Larkvertible V8
1958 Provincial wagon
1953 Commander coupe
1957 President 2-dr
1955 President State
1951 Champion Biz cpe
1963 Daytona project FS

curt
10-11-2005, 09:50 PM
The hard part is getting the drum off and knowing how much torque is involved on the axle nut holding the brake drum on. The inner bearing will need one pump from a hand grease gun once a year. Do not put much grease into the inner bearing, as stated above, the seal will brake with too much new grease.

Eman
10-15-2005, 10:11 AM
That was going to be my next question Curt. I've got larger rear brakes coming, but don't know how much torque to use when I put the axle nut back on.[?]

On a side note, an allen wrench provided just enough leverage to get the axles out. We put it through the holes (that are perpendicular to the axle) near the tip of the spindles and gave it all a few hard tugs.


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Roscomacaw
10-16-2005, 04:55 PM
So you're saying you stuck an Allen wrench thru the cotter pin hole and tugged on it to extract the axle? That was easy!

The big nut get's torqued to 170-200ft. lbs. That's to say, take it to 170 and then go as far beyond that as you have to to line the next slots in the castle nut with the cotter pin hole.;)

And might I repeat - NO lubricant or Nevr-Sieze or anything on the shaft taper or inside the hub. Nothing! It should be clean and dry.:)

Miscreant at large.

1957 Transtar 1/2ton
1960 Larkvertible V8
1958 Provincial wagon
1953 Commander coupe
1957 President 2-dr
1955 President State
1951 Champion Biz cpe
1963 Daytona project FS