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PalmerGA
09-13-2005, 03:49 PM
Greetings. My most needed next adventure for my 63 Daytona is a brake job. I'm contemplating the conversion to front discs (Turner kit type) but I'm also thinking about just going with a full brake job on the existing drum setup (probably with new lines/hoses, Master Cylinder if needed, etc.). I'd like to know your thoughts on which to do.

Money is not really a concern, but I hate to spend a grand on brakes for a car that I only toodle around on the weekends in. If it were a daily-driver, I could see it. Still, if it is highly recommended for safety's sake... I'd make the investment.

If a good thorough drum job would be sufficient, would someone like my local Midas shop be able to do a good job? Any experience with this?

Thanks y'all.

Jim's pride....
1963 Daytona Convertible

Swifster
09-13-2005, 04:24 PM
Just a word of caution. I had a '69 Plymouth Valiant with unassisted 4 wheel drums. For 90% of all braking, these will be fine. BUT...if you do any driving with this car in rush hour traffic, on a freeway, leave A LOT of room in front of you. I pretty well hammered the front end of that car on a old Horizon during rush hour traffic doing 60-65 MPH. Everything else on the road will most likely have power assisted discs and will be able to stop a lot faster than you.

Now that being said, other than that one little snafu, I didn't have any problems. I fixed the car and had a lesson that I learned.

As for a place like Midas, they will replace everything under the sun because they would have warranty concerns. I'll guarantee if the car goes in there you will pay to have the master cylinder, all wheel cylinders, all brake hoses, all shoes, all hardware, and possibly the drums replaced regardless of condition. Now, if this is your goal anyway, no problem. If it's not, you can do the work yourself on a sunny Saturday or Sunday (or both if you need to replace rusty lines).

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Tom - Sterling Heights, MI

Ancient Chinese Proverb: "Injection is nice, but I'd rather be blown!"

1964 Studebaker Daytona - Laguna Blue, Original 4-Spd. Car, Power Steering, Disc Brakes, Bucket Seats, Tinted Glass, Climatizer Ventilation System, AM Radio (136,989 Miles)

PalmerGA
09-13-2005, 04:34 PM
quote:Originally posted by Swifster

Just a word of caution. I had a '69 Plymouth Valiant with unassisted 4 wheel drums. For 90% of all braking, these will be fine. BUT...if you do any driving with this car in rush hour traffic, on a freeway, leave A LOT of room in front of you. I pretty well hammered the front end of that car on a old Horizon during rush hour traffic doing 60-65 MPH. Everything else on the road will most likely have power assisted discs and will be able to stop a lot faster than you.

Now that being said, other than that one little snafu, I didn't have any problems. I fixed the car and had a lesson that I learned.

As for a place like Midas, they will replace everything under the sun because they would have warranty concerns. I'll guarantee if the car goes in there you will pay to have the master cylinder, all wheel cylinders, all brake hoses, all shoes, all hardware, and possibly the drums replaced regardless of condition. Now, if this is your goal anyway, no problem. If it's not, you can do the work yourself on a sunny Saturday or Sunday (or both if you need to replace rusty lines).

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Tom - Sterling Heights, MI

Ancient Chinese Proverb: "Injection is nice, but I'd rather be blown!"

1964 Studebaker Daytona - Laguna Blue, Original 4-Spd. Car, Power Steering, Disc Brakes, Bucket Seats, Tinted Glass, Climatizer Ventilation System, AM Radio (136,989 Miles)

Thanks Swiftster. I learned to drive on a 64 Commander and can still hear my dad telling me to leave plenty of room for stopping. Much to the dismay of present-day tailgaters and quick lane changers, I still leave plenty of room even in my new cars. Thanks for the reminder though... and the info.

Jim's pride....
1963 Daytona Convertible

rockne10
09-13-2005, 08:51 PM
Nothing against Midas but I tend to agree with Swifster. A brake job is not difficult and you could buy most of the tools necessary for less than they would charge. Or find a reputable old shop that would appreciate the kind of jobs they used to do and appreciates your love of Studebakers. Alternatively, do what you can and subcontract things like turnings drums.

BRUCESTUDE
09-13-2005, 11:57 PM
I'VE ALWAYS HAD GOOD LUCK WITH THE STOCK BRAKES ON MY STUDES, MOST RECENTLY A '64 DAYTONA AND A '52 COMMANDER.
THEY STOP THE CAR FINE.
AS THE OTHER GUYS RECOMMENDED, TRY TO DO IT YOUR SELF IF YOU ARE SO INCLINED. IF YOU CAN, BUY PARTS AT A BRAKE SUPPLY SHOP OR A LOCAL AUTO PARTS (THE ONE WITH THE OLD GUYS BEHIND THE COUNTER), PLACES LIKE AUTO ZONE OR SCHUCKS CAN TEST YOUR PATIENCE!
USE YOUR SHOP MANUAL, AND OF COURSE FOR PEACE OF MIND, REPLACE ALL HOSES. I HAVE FOUND, TOO, THAT IF YOUR WHEEL OR MASTER CYLS. ARE PITTED, BUY REPLACEMENTS, INSTEAD OF HONING THEM.
FINALLY, PLAN ON REPACKING ALL WHEEL BEARINGS WHILE YOU ARE AT IT; PLAN ON HAVING THE CAR ON JACKSTANDS FOR A WEEK OR SO.

Swifster
09-14-2005, 12:22 AM
A week or so? [:0]

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Tom - Sterling Heights, MI

Ancient Chinese Proverb: "Injection is nice, but I'd rather be blown!"

1964 Studebaker Daytona - Laguna Blue, Original 4-Spd. Car, Power Steering, Disc Brakes, Bucket Seats, Tinted Glass, Climatizer Ventilation System, AM Radio (136,989 Miles)

Transtar56
09-15-2005, 12:50 PM
If your only driving the car a bit on weekends,and you don't live on top of a mountain,the stock Stude brakes are fine.
Trouble is,I get so used to them (I drive Studes everyday except in salt season) that when you get behind the wheel of a modern car,your liable to send everyones head into the windsheild on the first stop or two.
I did just that last weekend.

Rerun
09-15-2005, 05:20 PM
An ancient Chinese proverb: You don't want to be the only car on the Interstate with drum brakes!
Seriously, a fully reconditioned drum system stops a poor second to disks. I have had several occasions on hilly terrain when I was reminded what the term "brake fade" means. I think that it would be better to spend the money to go to disks, rather than tuning up old brake technology.

Jim Bradley

casey
09-15-2005, 05:58 PM
I have a '64 4dr Challenger with V8. I put an Avanti II brake booster in place of the original master cylinder. Bolted right up, no modifications whatsoever. The car now stops great, I mean GREAT, with the original drum brakes. I don't see any reason to consider the expensive disc brake conversion if there is any way you can retrofit some sort of booster on your Stude.

Transtar56
09-15-2005, 06:58 PM
Seriously Rerun,I drive my cars on the highways and interstates with the stock Stude drum brakes and never have a problem.Ive driven in some hilly terrain and if you use your tranny and don't ride the pedal,your fine.
Most really mountain roads like our Cabot Trail has lots of places to get out and let the brakes cool off some.
Have you ever driven a Stude up Mount Washinton in New Hampshire.
I did in my 62 Lark.
No problem.

rockne10
09-15-2005, 09:07 PM
I agree; other than the undersized brakes in the early fifties, don't overheat your brakes by riding them and they'll be fine when you need them. Even disc brakes can fade if you don't take your foot off the pedal.
If you like riding someone's bumper invest in disc brakes.

PalmerGA
09-16-2005, 10:24 AM
Thanks for all the comments/opinions. In an attempt to keep my Stude as "original" as possible, I'll probably stick with the current configuration. Will I do the job myself???? That's still kickin' around in my head. My manual makes it look easy for the basic brake job but I'm really wanting to revamp the entire system (new brake lines, master cylinder, etc.), so I'm still thinking it over.

I'll keep you posted and (if I tackle it myself) will likely be asking for more advice.

Thanks again....

Jim's pride....
1963 Daytona Convertible

Transtar56
09-16-2005, 10:17 PM
Palmer,if your Daytona has ever been run in any salt,the original brake lines will be rusty lookin,esp under neath the clamps that hold the lines in.
If you really want complete confidence in your 63,do what I did with the Hawk.
I replaced all the brake lines with new,I got four new wheel cylinders and a new master cylyinder from Chck Collins,and of course replace all three brake hoses.
It stops just fine.
The rear shoes were toast so I also relaced rhem with new ones,the fronts looked almost new so I cleaned them up and are using the.
This would correspond with rhe cars mileage,68,000.One nrw set of front shoes on the front and likly the original ones.