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Dingleberry
08-02-2005, 11:57 AM
I bought the Lark VI that I had in high school from a guy who restored it, and since I bought it back I have nothing but problems. I bought it back for sentimental reasons, as my other hobby cars are aircooled VWs; which are much more reliable, better engineered (unless you like heat in winter) and cheaper to maintain and get parts for. (You can probably tell I am a little miffed at the Lark today.)

Here's my problem; I was having lean mixture problems. The car would only run a few blocks and then would not idle or restart. I would have to let the car set about 30 min and I could start it and nurse it home; barely. So I changed the fuel pump and filter and the car ran drastically better; or so it seemed. The car ran fine for a few days, but on short neighborhood trips. I had to go to a family party across the city on Sunday. It has been miserably hot here in Chicago and I noticed that after the car was warmed up the motor would start pinging, a sign of lean mixture or advanced timing. Then I noticed the roughess of idle then it died at a stopsign and would not restart. The fuel filter appeared empty. The temp gauge looked normal, btw. I only got about 4 miles in city traffic. I went back later at night and was able to drive the car home. As if that wasnt enough aggravation for the day, I busted a rear brake hose while backing it into the garage. I actually feel lucky that it happened there, though.

The fuel filter looks OK, but I will go get another one and try it because they are cheap. Will an electric fuel pump be the fix here? The heat-riser valve under the carb seems to move OK. Could this thing be the problem?

I dont remember having any vapor lock or fuel problems when I owned the car the first time, but it seems common enough if I read the posts here. Your comments are most appreciated.

Paul Leske
'59 Lark VI

curt
08-02-2005, 12:21 PM
SOunds like a Kaiser I once had. My problem was the pick up tube in the gas tank. Once gas demand was present the tube pulgged , after sitting the plug opened untill demand for gas resucked the plug into the pick up tube. Also , I have heard a pin hole in the pick up tube will give similar symptoms when the gas level in the tank falls below the pin hole level.

Dingleberry
08-02-2005, 01:06 PM
Hmmm... I thought of that. I wish I had a compressor so I could blow some air back through the gas line. The previous owner had the pickup removed to change the sending unit because the gas gauge was not working. I asked him when I started having the problem if the pickup screen could be plugged up and he said the tank looked really good and clean with no sediment. It may be time to take a looksee for myself.


quote:Originally posted by curt

SOunds like a Kaiser I once had. My problem was the pick up tube in the gas tank. Once gas demand was present the tube pulgged , after sitting the plug opened untill demand for gas resucked the plug into the pick up tube. Also , I have heard a pin hole in the pick up tube will give similar symptoms when the gas level in the tank falls below the pin hole level.


Paul Leske
'59 Lark VI

Buddy1944
08-02-2005, 02:10 PM
There is a very easy method to determine if the stopping problem is fuel related. Buy a remote starter switch and a can of starter fluid from the local parts store. Attach the remote starter from the battery ground wire to the starter solenoid center tap. A little starter fluid on the air filter and then enguage the starter. If your problem is fuel related it will now start and run for a few seconds. This tells me..."FUEL PUMP"... if the engine starts...

If it doesn't start, compression may be the culprit. Good Luck...

whacker
08-02-2005, 06:47 PM
Hot summer, slow moving traffic, mechanical fuel pump, modern gas - this car is screaming vapor lock at you! I recommend you heat shield the fuel line and install an electric fuel pump back by the gas tank. Some people also put a gallon of diesel fuel to each full tank of gas.

studeclunker
08-03-2005, 05:10 AM
B.T.D.T. I will preface this statement with; this is going to sound nuts but...[:I]

Wooden clothes pins.[:I] You know, the ones with the metal spring in the middle? If you have those handy put them on the fuel line and it will insulate it.[8)] Looks dorky but works like a charm. Should take between thirty and fourty. Also, is your fuel line secured with a metal clamp at the top of the motor? If so, remove it. The clamp is radiating heat into your fuel line.

About the clothes pins; they are only needed from the fuel pump to the carb.

Have you cleaned out your fuel tank? Remember, it has been a few years since you've owned this car. Who knows what is in that tank. I found several interesting items in mine. Including a ping-pong ball. Was your tank about 1/4 full when it stalled?

One last thing. At 46 years old this car is tired. Just because someone has restored it does'nt mean that they addressed every mechanical problem the car has. You seem to have found two they did'nt address. I would replace the rest of those flexible brake lines if I were you. Oh yes, and the flexible fuel lines as well. Especially the one that comes directly out of the fuel tank.

The engineering of the V.W. is admirable. The Baron Von Porche designed a marvelous car for Adolph Hitler in the Volkswagon (or 'peoples car'). Being over 6' I can't drive one. I can drive the Lark.

One last thing (and then I promise to shut up and go away)[:I]. Put your electric fuel pump in the engine compartment. With a six in there room is not a problem. Then when problems do surface it's easy to get to.

Lotsa Larks!
K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
Studeclunker

Transtar60
08-03-2005, 09:17 AM
The fuel pickup tube should not have anything to do with the sending unit. On my all larks the gas feeds from passenger side front , a fitting welded(soldered?)to the tank.

Yeah may be time to clean it out. Could also be time to replace the steel fuel line from tank to engine compartment.

BTDT. Not fun but it works.

Dingleberry
08-03-2005, 11:25 AM
So what is the best way to wire the electric fuel pump up...through the ignition switch?

You were right; gas gauge shows 1/4 tank. The clothespin trick seems funny but may be worth a try. I also am on a Ford 8N tractor forum and I have heard guys talk about it there, but I have always dismissed it as superstition.

As for the VWs, I am 6'2" and am quite comfortable driving my '66 Beetle. I do find myself hunched over the steering wheel of my '55 VW pickup in order to see the stoplights but I am otherwise comfortable. Perhaps the largest car I have owned was a '56 Packard Executive. I sold that about 3 years ago.




quote:Originally posted by studeclunker

B.T.D.T. I will preface this statement with; this is going to sound nuts but...[:I]

Wooden clothes pins.[:I] You know, the ones with the metal spring in the middle? If you have those handy put them on the fuel line and it will insulate it.[8)] Looks dorky but works like a charm. Should take between thirty and fourty. Also, is your fuel line secured with a metal clamp at the top of the motor? If so, remove it. The clamp is radiating heat into your fuel line.

About the clothes pins; they are only needed from the fuel pump to the carb.

Have you cleaned out your fuel tank? Remember, it has been a few years since you've owned this car. Who knows what is in that tank. I found several interesting items in mine. Including a ping-pong ball. Was your tank about 1/4 full when it stalled?

One last thing. At 46 years old this car is tired. Just because someone has restored it does'nt mean that they addressed every mechanical problem the car has. You seem to have found two they did'nt address. I would replace the rest of those flexible brake lines if I were you. Oh yes, and the flexible fuel lines as well. Especially the one that comes directly out of the fuel tank.

The engineering of the V.W. is admirable. The Baron Von Porche designed a marvelous car for Adolph Hitler in the Volkswagon (or 'peoples car'). Being over 6' I can't drive one. I can drive the Lark.

One last thing (and then I promise to shut up and go away)[:I]. Put your electric fuel pump in the engine compartment. With a six in there room is not a problem. Then when problems do surface it's easy to get to.

Lotsa Larks!
K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
Studeclunker



Paul Leske
'59 Lark VI

wagone
08-03-2005, 11:44 AM
This is just a comment (not intended to be a help or fix), but my Avanti has a similar problem which is not vapor lock as mine doesn't deliver much of any fuel to the carb even when the engine is cold. It is amazing, as an aside, how much work these cars still need when they supposedly are "restored". I don't know how the Lark tank is configured, but on the Avanti the fuel connection is on the bottom of the tank with an elbow coming off the tank through what must be a threaded fitting welded to the underside of the tank. It would have been nice if Studebaker had assembled the elbow to the fitting and then welded both as one unit to the tank. Apparently they welded the fittig to the tank first and then screwed the elbow onto the fitting. Unfortunately when this elbow got tight in the fitting it ended up facing the right side of the car and the gas line approaches the elbow from the left side. Hence the rubber hose to connect the two has to make a bend of almost 180 degrees and as a result the hose has two serious crimps in it from making the tight bend required. I believe that this is the source of my fuel delivery problems. The weather here is supposed to cool off some tomorrow and I hope to be able to drain the tank (without getting a bath in fuel) and replace the hose. Wish me luck and any advice like putting the cigar out first will be accepted. I intend to use fuel injection hose as a replacement as it hopefully will resist the kinking or crimping better. Any advice?
wagone and Avanti I

studeclunker
08-04-2005, 03:16 AM
Paul, how do you work the (VW) clutch?[:0] I can't get my foot all the way up after depressing it.[:I] Used to cause a lot of giggles with my friends who had dubs.:D:D:D:D:D I always liked the Beetles espically the Super Beetles. Was never able to efectively drive them though. Besides, I don't like having to fold up to get into a car. Speaking of folding up; have you ever tried to get into one of the original Hondas? I thought the salesman would wet his pants when I tried it back in the early seventies. Back then they sold the cars at the motorcycle dealerships. I'll stick with the Larks thanks.

My appologies to the moderator for sliding aside on subject and vehicle content.[:I]

Lotsa Larks!
K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
Studeclunker

Dingleberry
08-04-2005, 09:58 AM
Like I said, I am 6'2", 240 lb. and I have no problems fitting into the old Kaefer. The Lark is quite comfortable I admit. My 15 yr. old daughter commented that she wouldnt want to sit in the back seat of the Stude on a long trip due to lack of leg room. I drive with the seat all the way back and she is 5'10". 15 yr old girls like to complain too much.


quote:Originally posted by studeclunker

Paul, how do you work the (VW) clutch?[:0] I can't get my foot all the way up after depressing it.[:I] Used to cause a lot of giggles with my friends who had dubs.:D:D:D:D:D I always liked the Beetles espically the Super Beetles. Was never able to efectively drive them though. Besides, I don't like having to fold up to get into a car. Speaking of folding up; have you ever tried to get into one of the original Hondas? I thought the salesman would wet his pants when I tried it back in the early seventies. Back then they sold the cars at the motorcycle dealerships. I'll stick with the Larks thanks.

My appologies to the moderator for sliding aside on subject and vehicle content.[:I]

Lotsa Larks!
K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
Studeclunker



Paul Leske
'59 Lark VI