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Dingleberry
07-13-2005, 10:57 PM
Back on the drum puller topic again...

What is the best puller to buy? I have seen a couple of expensive pullers in some of the Stude parts catalogs but I would like to know what would be the best to buy as I have a leaky wheel cylinder that I need to take care of. Any suggestions??

As a sidenote, I just changed hubs and wheel seals on my old 8N tractor, which has tapered hubs like a Stude. With the tractor you can loosen the axle nut and drive the tractor in a figure-8 pattern and it will usually knock the hubs loose. Anyone try this with a Stude?

Paul Leske
'59 Lark VI

Sonny
07-13-2005, 11:10 PM
I have a real heavy three-legged puller, with a big attachment that looks like ears, that I can put on the screw end so I can whack the hell out of it Paul. I gotta tell ya, I have had a few hubs that were so bad and that hub puller was soooo tight that I was afraid to whack it any more! [:0] I'm damn sure glad to have a real heavy puller, it's been needed too many times.

Nope, never tried the figure eight trick, but I'm willin' to try! Thanks for the tip Paul.

Sonny
http://RacingStudebakers.com

studegary
07-14-2005, 02:04 PM
I have heard of people driving a Studebaker around with the axle nut loose in order to free the drum. I believe that it has worked sometimes, probably with the drums that wouldn't have been too hard to remove in the first place. I don't use this technique and I do not recommend it. I use a good puller, tighten it up and give the end a good whack. I believe that most everyone now uses the universal, three leg pullers because the original Studebaker style pullers (no legs and works with a wedge) are hard to find.

Sonny
07-14-2005, 05:33 PM
quote:Originally posted by studegary

I have heard of people driving a Studebaker around with the axle nut loose in order to free the drum. I believe that it has worked sometimes, probably with the drums that wouldn't have been too hard to remove in the first place. I don't use this technique and I do not recommend it. I use a good puller, tighten it up and give the end a good whack. I believe that most everyone now uses the universal, three leg pullers because the original Studebaker style pullers (no legs and works with a wedge) are hard to find.


Actually, I don't like the old style Stude puller much at all. It's just a LOT harder to set up and work with if you try to use it on other-than-Stude vehicles. The three-legged puller is much more universal, (lug layout, axle length).

If you really have to whack on the Stude-type to get a bad drum off, I think it imposes too much side load stress on the bearings and axle. The three-legged puller works at the strongest point, has more of a mechanical advantage in the "throw", (or depth of the screw), and the fact that it pulls more evenly, straight off. I think the Stude-type "boogers" up the end of the axle faster too. That, and if you use the Stude puller much, that damn wedge gets pretty scared up if you have a couple of bad ones, reducing it's effect on the end of the axle. It just wears out too soon and replacing that wedge is hell, (supposed to be super hardened steel).

Yep, I had an old Stude-type puller, it went with my Furds. :D

Sonny
http://RacingStudebakers.com

Danarchy
07-14-2005, 06:18 PM
alittle off subject, but what do think of these "Flanged Axles"?
http://www.fairbornstudebaker.com/images/15_small.jpg
http://www.fairbornstudebaker.com/images/14_small.jpg
from FAIRBORN Studebaker
Would they be a good option for a daily driver?

Dallas,Texas

Mike B
07-14-2005, 09:12 PM
I have heard contradictory to this, but when I bought my Avanti 20+ years ago, the rear hubs had the studs as part of the hub, not part of the drum. When I was rebuilding my Avanti, I wanted to get the hub off the tapered shaft in order to replace bearings and seals. I used a rather large three wing gear puller I borrowed from my friends machine shop. The shaft is tapered and I shot penetrating oil on the shaft where it met the hub. I tried the force of the puller and smacked on the puller w/o any luck. I had to apply heat with a rose bud (evenly and carefully) on the hub where it met the shaft and once it broke free, the hub flew about four feet. I could not see any other way of getting it off unless you pull the shaft off and use a 10-25 ton hydraulic press. Some might say I ruined the hub, but this was a standard practice we used when I worked on high speed rotating equipment, using a puller and or press and applying heat was very common to diassemble parts frozen to shafts.

whacker
07-14-2005, 10:19 PM
I use a home made puller that one of my machinist friends made for me. Imagine the shape of a top hat, with a big screw threaded though the top and five holes on a 4.5 bolt circle around the brim. The "brim" is about 1/2 inch thick, for plenty of strength. This thing weighs a bunch! It is solid steel. I have never had it fail me. I can use a 2.5 foot breaker bar on the center screw, or I can use my 1/2" air impact. Never have had a problem, and I have pulled drums on junk yard cars that had at least 30 years of rust holding them together. If there was more demand, I might try to sell them!

BRUCESTUDE
07-14-2005, 11:38 PM
I WENT AHEAD AND BOUGHT A THREE LEGGED PULLER, AND IT SURE HAS PAID OFF; I'VE DONE 4 DIFFERENT SETS OF BRAKES IN 2 YEARS. ALSO IT WAS GETTING IMPOSSIBLE TO FIND THESE PULLERS FOR RENT, AND I HATE TO BORROW TOOLS....SINCE I HAVE ONE OF THESE, IT'S NO BIGGIE TO PULL THE DRUM FOR ANY OLD REASON, NO NEED TO PUT IT OFF!
I WENT TO A TOOL STORE AND FOUND THE PULLER IN AN "OLD FORGE" BRAND
CATALOG, IT COST ABOUT $80.

BY THE WAY, TRY AN AIR POWERED IMPACT WRENCH TO TIGHTEN THE PULLER, INSTEAD OF THE HAMMER THING, IT WORKS GREAT IN ALL BUT THE MOST STUBBORN CASES.

ALSO-CHECK THE AXLE NUT, REPLACE IF THE THREADS ARE BAD, MOST VENDORS CARRY NEW ONES, CHEAP INSURANCE.

Sonny
07-15-2005, 12:40 AM
quote:Originally posted by Danarchy

alittle off subject, but what do think of these "Flanged Axles"?
http://www.fairbornstudebaker.com/images/15_small.jpg
http://www.fairbornstudebaker.com/images/14_small.jpg
from FAIRBORN Studebaker
Would they be a good option for a daily driver?

Dallas,Texas


Hell yeah! Waaaaay more than you actually need for a daily driver Dan! But, all of the stuff is excellent grade parts. The setup is done very nicely. A nice way to enhance the value of the car and a lot easier than having to repack the tapered axle bearings too! I don't thiink this was really off topic. Ya don't need a puller with that setup! ;)

Sonny
http://RacingStudebakers.com

Sonny
07-15-2005, 12:44 AM
quote:Originally posted by Mike B

I have heard contradictory to this, but when I bought my Avanti 20+ years ago, the rear hubs had the studs as part of the hub, not part of the drum. When I was rebuilding my Avanti, I wanted to get the hub off the tapered shaft in order to replace bearings and seals. I used a rather large three wing gear puller I borrowed from my friends machine shop. The shaft is tapered and I shot penetrating oil on the shaft where it met the hub. I tried the force of the puller and smacked on the puller w/o any luck. I had to apply heat with a rose bud (evenly and carefully) on the hub where it met the shaft and once it broke free, the hub flew about four feet. I could not see any other way of getting it off unless you pull the shaft off and use a 10-25 ton hydraulic press. Some might say I ruined the hub, but this was a standard practice we used when I worked on high speed rotating equipment, using a puller and or press and applying heat was very common to diassemble parts frozen to shafts.


Heating them isn't unusual at all Mike, I've used heat a lot. You have to be careful, don't use too much and heat it evenly, works every time.

Sonny
http://RacingStudebakers.com

JDP
07-15-2005, 01:04 AM
We had a fellow on the Studebaker NG that thought he'd never buy the flanged axles, than lost a rear wheel on his nice GT Hawk just before York. He then ordered and picked up 3 sets from Phil. The guy that bought my R2 Lark and broke one axle bought a set and just loves them.
If you know your tapered axles are in good shape, and have been well maintained over their life, they are unlikly to break. It also depends on the value of your car and how you drive it. The 3 times I broke a axle, I never lost a wheel, but others have.

Studebaker On The Net http://stude.com
64 R2 4 speed Challenger (Plain Wrapper)
63 R2 4 speed GT Hawk
55 Speedster
50 2R 10 truck

1949commander
07-15-2005, 09:44 AM
Try using the three leg puller, tighten it then use a pneumatic air hammer. I have undone stuck tapered ball joins with on brief rap of the pneumatic air hammer, best air tool I have ever used. The high frequency vibration is the secret. Especially usefull if you want to remove a tie rod end without tearing the boot.[8D]

Restore it, don't replace it.Keep the Studebaker reproduction industry going