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fh929
06-26-2005, 09:38 PM
I need to change the coil on my 37. I have the shop manual
but it does not tell me how it is wired. as you can tell I am not very good at this. the new coil has a + and - but the old one does not. which wire goes where? being pos. ground I would think the wire to the distributator would go on the -?
been having trouble geting the car to start. seems to have no spark. I have changed the plugs, points, cond. , rotor. while checking the coil, I found a loose wire. while trying to fix it the screw broke off !![V] so now I have to replace. any help will be great. thanks

Dwain G.
06-27-2005, 12:17 PM
I'm not particularly knowledgable on pre-war cars, but I think your Dictator originally had a coil with the ignition wire inside an armored cable to the switch. So there was only one small wire terminal at the coil, and it went to the distributor. On a modern coil with two primary terminals, and being used on a positive ground system, The ignition (hot) wire goes to the coil (-) and the distributor wire goes to coil (+). You could say that since the battery cables are 'reversed', so are the coil wires.

Dwain G.

fh929
06-27-2005, 06:19 PM
Thanks for the info. I had it wired right. But it still will not start. I have changed everything. Not sure what to do next. I can't find any one here that knows the "old" cars. have been thinking of updating to a newer studebaker Frank H.

Dwain G.
06-27-2005, 08:07 PM
Well, where did this new coil come from, and does it have any numbers on it? Do you have a simple test light to check a few things with?

Dwain G.

fh929
06-28-2005, 10:24 PM
I was given a used coil that was known to be good. The numbers are prestolite 200627. it has been painted and that is the best I can see. I don't have a test light I can get one though.

Dwain G.
06-28-2005, 11:28 PM
I was hoping to be able to catalog those numbers and identify the coil. Do you know for certain what it was used on, and if it is for 6 volt operation? I couldn't find that exact number, but I do see 200xxx numbers used on either 6 or 12 volt. You might need to take it to a shop and have it tested.

Dwain G.

fh929
06-29-2005, 03:04 PM
It is a 6 volt. that is printed on it. I know the guy very well that gave it to me. He said it is agood coil. I am towing it to a garage tomorrow. I have done all I know how to do. I have changed the coil, cond. points, and plugs.The wires are new too, as is the cap. If he gets it started, I will let you know what the problem was.
Thanks for trying to help. Frank H.

DEEPNHOCK
06-29-2005, 05:43 PM
Bench test the coil...
Hook up a plug wire and a spark plug (ground the spark plug..)
Ground the pos side, and supply 6 volts to the neg side...
Just touch the neg side with a 6 volt source.
You should get a spark when you pull the wire away.
Then you can start checking the circuit...
Remember that the wire from the coil to the distributor is just a method of controlling the timing of grounding out the coil. The flow of electricity should be grounded all the time the ignition is on...except for the time the points are open. When you interrupt the ground, the current flow will always try to go to ground, and the next easiest path (after closed points) is to go through the secondary windings and then out the coil wire to the plug (through the dist. cap). If you have no spark, your methodology should be to make sure the circuit is energized at each point. Losing a ground is pretty common. That's why I suggest to isolate the coil to confirm function. Then test each part of the circuit.
Hang in there. It is a simple machine. You'll get it all right.
Jeff[8D]



quote:Originally posted by fh929

It is a 6 volt. that is printed on it. I know the guy very well that gave it to me. He said it is agood coil. I am towing it to a garage tomorrow. I have done all I know how to do. I have changed the coil, cond. points, and plugs.The wires are new too, as is the cap. If he gets it started, I will let you know what the problem was.
Thanks for trying to help. Frank H.


DEEPNHOCK at Cox.net
'37 Coupe Express
'37 Coupe Express Trailer
'61 Hawk
http://community.webshots.com/user/deepnhock

Roscomacaw
06-29-2005, 07:35 PM
Jeff, I hope you don't mind if I set this right: "the current flow will always try to go to ground, and the next easiest path (after closed points) is to go through the secondary windings and then out the coil wire to the plug"

That's not the case. The current doesn't take the "next easiest path". The current simply ceases to flow when the points are opened and the magnetic field that said flow was inducing (around the coil's windings) proceeds to collapse. That collapsing magnetic field creates a momentary voltage in the secondary windings as it washes over them in the course of it's demise (It's really a generator of sorts) And it does so with such great potential (voltage) that IT (the momentary induced voltage) will jump a gap (like a spark plug gap) to find it's way to ground.[:I]

Miscreant at large.

1957 Transtar 1/2ton
1960 Larkvertible V8
1958 Provincial wagon
1953 Commander coupe
1957 President 2-dr
1955 President State
1951 Champion Biz cpe
1963 Daytona project FS

DEEPNHOCK
07-10-2005, 07:24 AM
Well said.
There is no 'direct' connection between the primary circuit and the secondary circuit,where current flows to ground .
The interruption of the ground in the primary circuit is what I was trying to emphasize.
So many try to visualize the circuit as if the points were a power supply interrupter instead of a ground source that gets interrupted.
Thanks for the clarification.
Jeff[8D]



quote:Originally posted by Mr.Biggs

Jeff, I hope you don't mind if I set this right: "the current flow will always try to go to ground, and the next easiest path (after closed points) is to go through the secondary windings and then out the coil wire to the plug"

That's not the case. The current doesn't take the "next easiest path". The current simply ceases to flow when the points are opened and the magnetic field that said flow was inducing (around the coil's windings) proceeds to collapse. That collapsing magnetic field creates a momentary voltage in the secondary windings as it washes over them in the course of it's demise (It's really a generator of sorts) And it does so with such great potential (voltage) that IT (the momentary induced voltage) will jump a gap (like a spark plug gap) to find it's way to ground.[:I]

Miscreant at large.

1957 Transtar 1/2ton
1960 Larkvertible V8
1958 Provincial wagon
1953 Commander coupe
1957 President 2-dr
1955 President State
1951 Champion Biz cpe
1963 Daytona project FS


DEEPNHOCK at Cox.net
'37 Coupe Express
'37 Coupe Express Trailer
'61 Hawk
http://community.webshots.com/user/deepnhock