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gecoe
06-25-2005, 06:25 PM
I'm currently in the midst of a cross-country trip and my 50 Champion has been performing beutifully. The car hasn't complained about it but I'm kind of bothered by the operating temperature. We cruise at around 55 - 60 mph and the temperature gauge is at the top of the normal range. I verified the high reading by measuring the block temperature and found it to be running at approximately 200 degrees. Sitting at idle, driving through towns and even cruising at 45 mph yields a temperature in the mid-normal range but kicking the speed up to 50 and above takes it to the high end of the normal range. There's been no pinging problems and acceleration is excellant. The water pump was just replaced before this trip with a rebuilt one but I do now detect a very slight bit of wobble when I try to move the fan blades back and forth. I have a 4 lb pressure cap and am not having any boil over problems. All hoses, radiator and heater, are new. I'm running a 50/50 water/antifreeze mix along with an additive named Kool It.

Can anyone on here tell me what is happening? I would appreciate the help.

Sonny
06-25-2005, 10:45 PM
quote:Originally posted by gecoe

I'm currently in the midst of a cross-country trip and my 50 Champion has been performing beutifully. The car hasn't complained about it but I'm kind of bothered by the operating temperature. We cruise at around 55 - 60 mph and the temperature gauge is at the top of the normal range. I verified the high reading by measuring the block temperature and found it to be running at approximately 200 degrees. Sitting at idle, driving through towns and even cruising at 45 mph yields a temperature in the mid-normal range but kicking the speed up to 50 and above takes it to the high end of the normal range. There's been no pinging problems and acceleration is excellant. The water pump was just replaced before this trip with a rebuilt one but I do now detect a very slight bit of wobble when I try to move the fan blades back and forth. I have a 4 lb pressure cap and am not having any boil over problems. All hoses, radiator and heater, are new. I'm running a 50/50 water/antifreeze mix along with an additive named Kool It.

Can anyone on here tell me what is happening? I would appreciate the help.


It sure sounds like you already had everything covered Gerry. The ONLY thing that I can think of is that mebbe there's crud in the water jackets and from the long drive it's moved/moving around. Unfortunately, they tended to have a lot of casting sand left in there right from the factory. That stuff is like goop, and can collect and plug a good radiator.

Bob is right, the temp should be going down as you increase the air flow by driving. 200 degrees isn't too bad, but it's right on the edge. Perhaps you might consider a flush at some point. I dunno how good the power flush is, (offered at some of the bigger oil change franchises), but might be worth a shot.

Sonny
http://RacingStudebakers.com

hank63
06-26-2005, 05:13 AM
Your problem COULD come from a partially blocked radiator, ie enough cooling for small heat loads but getting marginal when the engine has to do some real work. With engine running, touch the front of the rad with your hand. Is the entire frontal surface of the same temp? You can actually feel the difference when part of the rad is blocked.
/H

gecoe
06-26-2005, 07:51 AM
Thanks for the suggestions guys. I hadn't heard of the power flush thing and wonder how it works. I did flush the engine myself last summer but don't know that I would call the garden hose I used "power".

You certainly present me with a challange Hank63. Your idea and test sound credible but getting my hand to the front of the radiator in that bullet nose is going to take some doing.

rockne10
06-26-2005, 02:40 PM
Your inquiry doesn't indicate you replaced the thermostat. With everything else you did I would assume so. Wobbly fan on a new water pump? Suspect; new doesn't necessarily mean good.
You can use a laser thermometer to find the relatively cool spots in your cooling system.
You can get acid or alkyline additives to prepare for a good flush but they can have an adverse affect on the head gaskets.
I'd try to find someone with a laser thermometer and narrow the possibilities.

gecoe
06-26-2005, 09:06 PM
rockne10,

i didn't replace the thermostat because the one in the car was working well. i have a spare with me jic but didn't believe i needed it yet. as a matter of fact, everything works great up to around 45 mph so i still think it's good.

i have an infrared thermometer with a laser pointer with me. it's a part of my multimeter. it's unclear to me however, what you are suggesting. are you saying to check the radiator for hot and cold spots. it's my impression that there should be about 15 degrees difference between the bottom and top of the radiator.

sorry about this post but for some reason my shift key stopped working. got to try to fix that too.

hank63
06-27-2005, 08:08 AM
With a laser thermometer it should be relatively easy to check if you have blocked tubes. A couple of years ago I used my hand to notice several "cooler" tubes on a rad. Had to do it from below, though.
When sweating off the bottom tank we found about 1/3 of the tubes blocked solid, all to one side as I recall. Some "rodding" and flushing later and all tubes were clear. That car then cooled OK.
"Rodding" is exactly what it sounds like, a rod pushed through the tube (with some care, the tubes aren't all that strong).
/H

Sonny
06-27-2005, 02:24 PM
quote:Originally posted by gecoe

Thanks for the suggestions guys. I hadn't heard of the power flush thing and wonder how it works. I did flush the engine myself last summer but don't know that I would call the garden hose I used "power".

You certainly present me with a challange Hank63. Your idea and test sound credible but getting my hand to the front of the radiator in that bullet nose is going to take some doing.


The power flush is pretty straight forward, (although it does, or should, take some time). They should remove your thermostat and connect your upper and lower hoses from the engine to a unit that circulates a chemical cleaner through the block. It flushes in one direction then reverses the flow, alternating until you get a "clean" indication. They do the radiator that way too. I had a '66 Ford, big block done. It took about 2 1/2 hours and I was there for the whole process. The machine took some real crap out of the block and radiator, and it did help. I can't remember what it cost, (years ago), but I believe it was something like $70.00.

Sonny
http://RacingStudebakers.com