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bradnree
06-12-2005, 06:32 PM
Any conversion tips ?? Brad

Roscomacaw
06-12-2005, 06:43 PM
The frames are the same gage but there's a difference in thickness between 6cylinder cars and V8 cars. The 6s had lighter gage frames than the V8 cars. And the 53s had the flimsiest frames of any of the C-K cars . Improvments were made to the frames over the years with the 64 frames supposedly the best.
The V8 rears (a Dana type 44) would stand up to the GM engines. Better yet if you installed the new flanged axle conversion in it. The 6cylinder rear would be garbage in a short time![xx(]

Miscreant at large.

1957 Transtar 1/2ton
1960 Larkvertible V8
1958 Provincial wagon
1953 Commander coupe
1957 President 2-dr
1955 President State
1951 Champion Biz cpe
1963 Daytona project FS

N8N
06-12-2005, 08:43 PM
To clarify a little... I know what Mr. Biggs was trying to say but it may not be 100% clear to someone who doesn't know Studes...

C and K frames are the same gauge steel on otherwise identical cars (year and engine)

In some (most or all?) years, the six cylinder cars had lighter gauge frames.

Frames were made progressively thicker over the years, the GT Hawks had the thickest metal of all.

I agree on the Dana 44. Heck, a 300 HP SBC probably doesn't put out that much more *torque* than a stock Stude engine.

nate


--
55 Commander Starlight
62 Daytona hardtop
http://home.comcast.net/~njnagel

Dan White
06-12-2005, 09:12 PM
Here is a conversion tip, try a Stude V8 instead of a SBC. You should be able to get 250 to 300 hp from a Stude with a little work. There are plenty of folks in the club that can help you get the power you are looking for and stay somewhat original. (Take a look at Ted Harbit running a Stude V8 and blowing away BBC and others!) You can run a 4 spd, 5spd, or GM automatic (the last 2 with a conversion kit) if you want to run a different tranny. Why do you want to go to a SBC?

Dan White
64 R1 GT
64 R2 GT

Dick Steinkamp
06-12-2005, 10:54 PM
One other frame point...from '54 and up, an additional crossmember was added (near the front of the doors) which did a lot to stiffen things. Also, it makes a handy point for a trans mount if you end up installing a non-Studebaker trans.

I was at a car show this weekend. An 1952 Starlight was there that had been drag racing since the early 1960's in various forms from stock to a blown R3 engine. He was still running the keyed axle Dana 44 that the car came with (essentially the same rear end used through 1964). His best times were mid 12's. I would think he was making in excess of 500 HP to run those times with a heavy car. IMHO, the Dana 44 is as strong as a 9" Ford and lighter. As Biggs pointed out, it is even stronger and safer with the new flanged axle conversion.

Replacing the stock engine/trans is not a simple job. There is no "kit". There are front mounts available from some Stude vendors, but you will still be inventing and fabricating rear mounts, drive shaft, cooling, exhaust, throttle, shift/clutch linkage, fuel delivery, etc. etc. I have a Chevy in my '54 and I'd be happy to help you. If you haven't done something like this before, however, it can be frustrating and expensive (can be even if you've done it before <g>)

Regards,
-Dick-
-Dick-

BeeJay
06-13-2005, 06:59 AM
Have just recently put a C and a K on the street with Small Block Chevy's. While having front clip off, I boxed the frame by welding plates from top of frame to the "hat" section. Also replaced front suspension. Everyone has their own thing' but my thinking is that if you want 300HP why rework an engine to upgrade when you can get that out of a crate. Then if you want to rework, you can get much more than the 300HP. As a plus, parts for a small block Chev are available anywhere. If you intend to drive, you do not have to carry your spare parts with you. Leaves a lot more room for a bigger cooler.

Just my opinion.
BJ

Own '53 Commander Starliner. Red w/beige top. 350 Chev/700R4. Tilt,cruise,A/C.

Roscomacaw
06-13-2005, 12:12 PM
I'm gonna chime in here with my old verse. You can totally ignore it and I won't be the least bit annoyed.:D I've been branded with the P-word (purist - said with a tone of groan) and called A** H*** enough times to where I've considered that maybe it's true. Just words tho. I'm at least sure that I'm NOT a "purist" by anyone's stretch. My PERSONAL guidelines? Keep the body - keep the motor - change EVERYTHING else if you like! It's STILL a Studebaker.
If you're entranced by a Studebaker - why not have a WHOLE Studebaker? They designed and built their own engines. They debuted a V8 FOUR years before one showed up in a Chevy showroom and it was superior to the latecomer in a number of ways. With a stock forged crankshaft, solid lifters and a meaty block that doesn't NEED lower end enhancments to be able to crank out 800HP (not a typo;)), they were ahead of the game from the start.[}:)]
Yes, you can buy HP off the shelf with bow-tie stuff. I don't deny that. But then you've basically got a chevy in Stude clothing. Goes fast alright, and is another chrome-bedecked yawner under the hood.
Why not show that you're REALLY different by lighting your tires with something that all the others know NADA about? A kick-ass Studebaker engine. Of course, it IS your car, and I respect that. But for the cost of the engine and engineering you'll invest, you can get a 259 or 289, have the heads massaged and show something that'll have the usual suspects scratching their collective heads. Oh - and it'll basically bolt right in!

Go to Sonny's website Racingstudebakers.com and explore a bit. See what's really what as to superior small blocks. Also be advised that the Salt-to-Salt team's just got dyno results back on the 185 flathead 6 they'll be running again at Bonneville - 250 HP!!! But, what do we know? All the hot rod magazines TELL you what's cool. And buying from their advertizers makes everyone happy.

Read what Dick and Dan have said here. There's no need for me to repeat the info they provide. And while Dick has a gorgeous, black Starliner with a 327 go-motor in it, we're still pretty good friends![:I] My bottom-line summation is that the sheet metal is only HALF the legacy that Studebaker left for us to marvel over. Just because most folks don't gush: "WOW! What a cool-lookin' motor!" doesn't mean the Stude engines don't have merit.;) And LOTS of it!

If you're still bent on re-motoring your Stude, there's folks here that can share. I can't because I haven't. Please don't think less of me for that failing.:D

OK - off my well-worn soapbox now. Throw your tomatoes and rotting fruit if you like. I'm used to it.[xx(]

Miscreant at large.

1957 Transtar 1/2ton
1960 Larkvertible V8
1958 Provincial wagon
1953 Commander coupe
1957 President 2-dr
1955 President State
1951 Champion Biz cpe
1963 Daytona project FS

Dan White
06-13-2005, 12:22 PM
I get Rod and Custom magazine and there appears to be a resurgence of orginal power plants in a lot of rods. For example several months ago a guy did a outstanding job making a '50 2 door convertible Kaiser from a sedan. Kaiser did not make a convertible until '52 I believe. Anyway the car was outstanding in many ways, but what really got my attention was the engine. It had a Paxton blown Kaiser (i.e. Continental) flathead 6! This guy could have easily taken the SBC route with all the work he put into his ride, but he didn't and that made the job all that much more outstanding. Seeing a worked Stude with 2 x 2 or something unusual always catches my eye, it shows a certain amount of originality and creativity that is often lacking in many rides.

Dan White
64 R1 GT
64 R2 GT

studegary
06-13-2005, 01:55 PM
Bob/Mr.Biggs - In general, I agree with you and your post. I just have to pick on one small item. Chevrolet cars had a model with a V8 engine in 1917. I am sure that you are referring to the more recent SBC from 1955. I don't believe that Studebaker used a V8 engine before 1951. Most engine parts for Studebaker V8s from 1951 to 1964 can be interchanged, but I don't believe that any parts from a late model SBC can be interchanged with those from a 1955. Chevrolet advertises 50 years of this engine, but I don't consider it to be the same engine. I will sum up my opinion with, it's your car, do what you want.

Swifster
06-13-2005, 03:51 PM
Yes, I'm using a small block 'Cadillac'. Actually I'm using a GM Gen III engine from a Cadillac Escalade. I call it a Cadillac engine as this engine (LQ9) is only available in the Escalade.

As most of this car is being modified (Corvette suspension, supercharged EFI engine, 6-speed trans, leather interior, etc.) I understand the urge to change things over to things we're familiar with. My goal with the car was to run it in Real Street Eliminator http://carcraft.com/eventcoverage/116_0504_rse/. I highly doubt I'd be able to get 550 HP and drivable manors with a 289 Studie, even with the supercharger.

Now, that being said, I'm getting a serious itch to get a '64 Challenger or Commander and stuff it with a slightly modified R3 engine and 4-speed. I'm doing some casual looking for another frame so I can keep the Daytona frame and suspension intact to use on a Challenger. I'm even looking at doubling up some of my part purchases to be prepared when the Daytona is done.

My goal, one modified Stude and one all Stude.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Tom - Sterling Heights, MI

Ancient Chinese Proverb: "Injection is nice, but I'd rather be blown!"

1964 Studebaker Daytona - Laguna Blue, Original 4-Spd. Car, Power Steering, Disc Brakes, Bucket Seats, Tinted Glass, Climatizer Ventilation System, AM Radio (136,989 Miles)

Alan
06-13-2005, 04:03 PM
The frame rails on my 53K are .071 thick. I have put 13 different engines in the car over 47 years. With over 275,000 miles on the body and chassis it still holds it's own under the power of a 355 Turbo Chevy
and a Tremic 5 Speed it runs 11.25 , 127 MPH. with 525 RWHP. but go into a driveway at the wrong angle and the door will sometimes pop. But I still gravatate back to Stude power but it is getting expensive.

mjeansonne
06-13-2005, 04:39 PM
I came very close to changing my Champ to Chevy engine, transmission and heck, even the frame. Boy did that stir some comments. But as Bro. Barlow Soper says: its your car... do what you want that makes you happy. I say, if thats the only way to keep the Stude name on the road... what the heck.

But then again, would you want to put a Honda engine in a Harley Davidson Bike? Of course not!!!!!

Laisez le bon temps roulez avec un Studebaker

Alan
06-13-2005, 05:51 PM
Like the Grump says if you spit on anything long enough it will go in, back in the 60's I put a 430 Linclon in a 49 Crosley station wagon because a friend of mine said it wouldn't fit.

MarkC
06-13-2005, 06:10 PM
Alan, a 430 Lincoln in a Crosley? I'm old enough to remember the Crosley, and THAT's a conversion I wish I could have seen!

Mark

MarkC, 64 Y8
Working in Spokane, WA

Roscomacaw
06-13-2005, 09:13 PM
Heh-heh..... Gary, you are a piece of work![}:)] When I was typing up my little post about my take on motor transplants, I thought to myself: "I need to make damned sure I put a disclaimer in this for Gary's sake, or he's gonna bop me on the nose with a newspaper over the 1917 Chevy V8!"
In the end,I forgot to do that and as predictable as the sunrise, you threw it up for me. Bless you for being predictably anal. If only we could count on more people to dot eyes and cross teas.
No, in fact I might well ENCOURAGE someone to do a 1917 Chevy V8 transplant if they had a mind to. At least it would be something original![:0]

Miscreant at large.

1957 Transtar 1/2ton
1960 Larkvertible V8
1958 Provincial wagon
1953 Commander coupe
1957 President 2-dr
1955 President State
1951 Champion Biz cpe
1963 Daytona project FS

Roscomacaw
06-13-2005, 09:26 PM
I once tried to reason with a fella who was dead set on inserting a Caddy Northstar in his Stude Starlight. Went on about how if he was broke down in East Jesus Montana, he didn't wanna be delayed because of a fuel pump or some such thing.
I countered that if he WAS broke down there with his Northstar-engined Stude - the first hurdle would be convincing a Caddy garage to even let the thing in one of their bays and the second thing would be that if they DID diagnose it for him and it turned out that a part was needed, it could be a WEEK before one got shipped in and fitted.
With a Stude V8 and a spare water and fuel pump and a few tools to change either, you'd be back under way before the tilt-back truck got to where your CaddyBaker was broke down so it could haul you to the nearest diagnostic computer! And consider if you'd had the luck to break down after all the local garages and parts stores had boarded up for the night OR weekend. Nope, that "GM parts are at every corner" - defense - just don't hold water
NOW, if you sling a rod or some such thing - you're gonna have your trip ruined no matter what you've got under the hood.[xx(]

Miscreant at large.

1957 Transtar 1/2ton
1960 Larkvertible V8
1958 Provincial wagon
1953 Commander coupe
1957 President 2-dr
1955 President State
1951 Champion Biz cpe
1963 Daytona project FS

Transtar60
06-13-2005, 09:29 PM
1917 Chevrolet V8, wasnt that the copper cooled nightmare??

Alan
06-13-2005, 09:44 PM
And exposed rockers and pushrods like some aircraft engines of the time

Tom B
06-13-2005, 10:24 PM
Has the original question about the champ/commander frames been answered?

In John Bridges' book he states that the fact that both lines used the same frame caused the front clip/body misalignment because the weigth of the V8 caused the body to sag in the middle.

In other words, the '53 C & K frames were all the same, regardless of six or eight cylinder engines. Yeah, .071 thick frames and the bodies were .045 thick. Pretty thin frame material.

Tom Bredehoft
'53 Commander Coupe
'60 Lark VI

Swifster
06-13-2005, 10:56 PM
By my parts book, the only cars between '59 and '64 that used different frames between six and eight cylinder cars are the '63 and '64 K model Hawks (and even then, the '62 six cylinder K frame was the same as the '62-'64 8 cylinder frame).

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Tom - Sterling Heights, MI

Ancient Chinese Proverb: "Injection is nice, but I'd rather be blown!"

1964 Studebaker Daytona - Laguna Blue, Original 4-Spd. Car, Power Steering, Disc Brakes, Bucket Seats, Tinted Glass, Climatizer Ventilation System, AM Radio (136,989 Miles)

Roscomacaw
06-13-2005, 11:10 PM
Tom, I just reviewed John's comments. I can't find where he specifically states that all the frames were the same. He DOES say that they came up with a "temporary fix" for V8 cars of using shims to adjust for frame sag. But that phrase "temporary fix" suggests that a more permanent fix was incurred eventually. Is that not a fair interpretation?
Reviewing the rest of the narrative, I see no more references to the frame sag or "permanent" cures for it. But to say that the shims were a temporary fix, suggests there was a cure - like maybe a heavier gage frame for the V8s.:) Heavier than had been initially anticipated V8s would need - as opposed to assuming that both shared the same gage frames.
If you look at the parts books, they show the same frame listed for the Champions and Commanders. In fact, this practice was carried on for ALL Stude cars thru the very end in 66. The reason for this was that since the frames were dimensionally the same, it was simply easier to stock for spares, the heavier gage frame instead of two different frames for the two lines of cars.
From a production line standpoint, lighter gage frames for the Champions added up to a savings. That's why the different frames to start with. For replacement frames, they knew they could get the same price - Champion or Commander - so it wasn't an issue.
I've actualy BEEN in a junkyard with a bunch of Studes and a metal gage in my pocket! I refused to believe that they'd used different frames for 6s vs 8s. I was wrong.[V]
I must confess tho, that this particular yard didn't have 53 C-K Champs and Commanders to compare. So I fall back again, to John Bridges "temporary fix" comment.[:I]

Miscreant at large.

1957 Transtar 1/2ton
1960 Larkvertible V8
1958 Provincial wagon
1953 Commander coupe
1957 President 2-dr
1955 President State
1951 Champion Biz cpe
1963 Daytona project FS

studegary
06-14-2005, 01:38 PM
[quote]Originally posted by Transtar60

1917 Chevrolet V8, wasnt that the copper cooled nightmare??

I don't believe so. I know something about many cars, particularly Studebakers, but I am far from expert on Chevrolets. The 1917 Chevrolet V8 was a Mason engine. I believe what you refer to as copper cooled is the air cooled Chevrolet of 1923.

Transtar60
06-15-2005, 09:57 PM
Its more disdain rather than interest.

Roscomacaw
06-16-2005, 09:46 AM
Brad, what didn't I answer here?

I quote myself:

"The frames are the same gage but there's a difference in thickness between 6cylinder cars and V8 cars. The 6s had lighter gage frames than the V8 cars. And the 53s had the flimsiest frames of any of the C-K cars . Improvments were made to the frames over the years with the 64 frames supposedly the best.
The V8 rears (a Dana type 44) would stand up to the GM engines. Better yet if you installed the new flanged axle conversion in it. The 6cylinder rear would be garbage in a short time!"

Note that I answered without mentioning any preference for motors in my first reply.

Miscreant at large.

1957 Transtar 1/2ton
1960 Larkvertible V8
1958 Provincial wagon
1953 Commander coupe
1957 President 2-dr
1955 President State
1951 Champion Biz cpe
1963 Daytona project FS

Swifster
06-16-2005, 10:03 AM
Hey Biggs, I think you're reading his post wrong. He was quoting his initial post and added the comment regarding 'Chevy Interest'. For newer users, the post with quotes takes a little getting used to. I more than one occasion I've had to edit a post because my response ended up in the 'quote'. I think that's what happened here.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Tom - Sterling Heights, MI

Ancient Chinese Proverb: "Injection is nice, but I'd rather be blown!"

1964 Studebaker Daytona - Laguna Blue, Original 4-Spd. Car, Power Steering, Disc Brakes, Bucket Seats, Tinted Glass, Climatizer Ventilation System, AM Radio (136,989 Miles)

Dick Steinkamp
06-20-2005, 09:22 PM
quote:Originally posted by bradnree

Any conversion tips ?? Brad


There are probably as many different ways to install a SBC in a Stude as there are installations <grin>. Stick or auto? One piece drive shaft or 2, Dana 44 rear or other? Stock front suspension? Fatman? Clip from a modern doner? Air conditioning? Power steering? Power brakes? Battery in engine compartment or trunk? '53 or '54?

My advice is to think EVERYTHING through before you start. There are a lot of failed conversions out there because of the difficulty and complexity of doing this. Plan it out, mock it up, make a list of everything that will need to change and how you will do each of these things in order for the "package" to actually work. Everything from pinion angle, to steering clearance, to throttle linkage, to drive shaft clearance, to cooling, to mounts to use (front and rear), to U-joints to use to adapt, firewall clearance, hood clearance, engine offset, etc., etc. Have everything figured out before you start.

Just my 2 cents.

-Dick-

Roscomacaw
06-21-2005, 08:28 AM
Dick, that dissertation was easily worth 4 cents! Really, you covered it well. The rush to convert, just because that's what's "cool" isn't always the wisest option.
(Requisite disclaimer) "Your car - Your choice":D

Miscreant at large.

1957 Transtar 1/2ton
1960 Larkvertible V8
1958 Provincial wagon
1953 Commander coupe
1957 President 2-dr
1955 President State
1951 Champion Biz cpe
1963 Daytona project FS

bradnree
06-21-2005, 07:09 PM
I can read at this site why modified cars and Stude street rods are not popular, except in "Turning Wheels" magazine. It sure is fun driving thousands of miles each year in a street rod itstead of looking under the covers in the garage to see if the car is still there--did this, or looking in the barn lot to see how the parked Stude museum is weathering. Let's put Studes on the road by only restoring them to an original driveable condition...not totally restored, and sell them to a new Stude friend !! This is all Very similar to the Ford purist who will never have the thrill of driving a Corvette...had two Vettes, been there. Gone roddin' at "62".....Brad

Swifster
06-21-2005, 07:25 PM
Not all of us are purists, Brad. I personally believe Chevy's are a 'legal' swap because Studebaker opened that door in 1965 and 1966. That's not to say I don't appreciate an original car, but there are enough of these cars (unless we're talking original R2 and R3 cars) to allow all of us to do our thing.

I'm going the Pro-Touring route with my Daytona, but as mentioned, I'd like to go with a '60's street machine (a '64 Challenger or Commander) with Stude power and a 4-speed. Hopefully when I'm a little further along with the Daytona I'll be able to find a clean 2-dr sedan for this kind of project.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Tom - Sterling Heights, MI

Ancient Chinese Proverb: "Injection is nice, but I'd rather be blown!"

1964 Studebaker Daytona - Laguna Blue, Original 4-Spd. Car, Power Steering, Disc Brakes, Bucket Seats, Tinted Glass, Climatizer Ventilation System, AM Radio (136,989 Miles)

52hawk
06-21-2005, 07:43 PM
Well da--it Swifster,I'm gonna disagree with ya here! Studebaker using GM engines in 65-66 doesn't make a 'legal swap'! But,what makes a 'legal swap'is the easy -going attitude of MOST SDC'ers,the feeling that just because you don't happen to have an original engine,you can still be a STUDEBAKER LOVER,and they won't throw rocks at your car at a Stude meet!!!!

last of the finned Hawks!!

Dan White
06-21-2005, 08:04 PM
Bradnee I think you missed the idea of the forum and your questions. This forum is made up of all types of folks and all opinions. I do not believe that there is any hostility with regard to street rodding Studebakers. You asked about doing a Chevy swap and you got a lot of input both pro and con and you are free to take it or leave it, as it has been said it is your car and you can do as you wish. What I and others have said is that yanking a Stude V8 and dropping a SBC in a Stude gets you little, unless you are looking to doing some wild drag racing.

My Opinion:
I currently have a 58 Stude half-ton street rod project that will use a 289 Stude bored out, EFI, and turbocharged, Turbohydromatic (which one is still under consideration), and Corvette front and rear suspension. I could easily do an SBC swap, but I want this to be different. If I live long enough I plan to do a '36 or '37 Terraplane with a 1955 Hudson 308 Flathead six (currently in storage) with either 3 side drafts or EFI. When I look at a street rod I look at the whole package, exterior, interior, drivetrain and it is often the drivetrain that is shortchanged and shows lack of imagination, i.e. SBC inserted no matter what make. As I noted in a previous post the guy that did the '50 Kaiser convertible with a blown Kaiser flathead six gets A+ on his job since he went all the way and did outstanding on all fronts and dared to be different.



Dan White
64 R1 GT
64 R2 GT

bradnree
06-21-2005, 09:04 PM
I have found all opinions and responses interesting. Thanks for the input...Brad

Roscomacaw
06-22-2005, 12:58 PM
brad, you'll note, I hope that I initially answered your questions with straightforward info per your request. It was only after that that I suggested considering keeping the Stude engine.
Honestly, without trying to sound superior here, I don't have to drive your car, judge it, ride in it, or single you out for derisive comments when you do what you want with it. There's others who'd be less considerate than that.

Here's the real "heart" of my take on it: A: As I previously mentioned, the Stude engine's as much a part of the Stude legacy as the sheet metal.
B: With the SBC being the univesal motor of choice - by virtue of the wealth of cheap, ready-to-drop-in engines and cheap dress-up brightwork - how "Custom" is it really, to go that route???[:o)]

I really like Dan's approach to his Studes - EFI, late trans, etc, but keeping that Stude block. THAT'S gotta set rodders a-scratchin' their heads! Going a different (custom?) route.

Quite some time ago, when the Plain Brown Wrapper was first tromping the BrandX competition at the Pure Stock Muscle Car Drags, one fella piped up and said (in essence): "I don't understand what all the fuss is about. If you just want to go fast in a Stude - drop a 500cu.in.+ Caddy engine in it!" Can you see where the point flew right over this guy's head?
Sure, you can stuff more cubes in and GO faster. The point of pride for the Studes is proving they were equal, as built, - if not potentially superior - to their contemporaries.
We're actualy lucky that the PBW's #1 pilot is such a humble fella. Otherwise his head would explode from all the accolades he's gotten from Studebaker faithful around the globe!

My point(s) having been outlined, again I repeat: Your Car - Your Choice.
If you don't get the insights you seek here, it's probably because no one (in attendance of this forum) has them to share. I sincerely hope you DO find the tips you seek to do what you want.;)
BTW, some of us Stude "old-timers" get a chuckle when someone pops up to ask if they can acquire a copy of the book about how to transplant a Chevy engine into a Stude. Of course, there really ISN'T such a book - but it appears there maybe should be. I'd suggest that if you DO a conversion, you take lots of good photos of every detail and then write that book that so many assume exists. It just might pay for your car in the end![:0]

Miscreant at large.

1957 Transtar 1/2ton
1960 Larkvertible V8
1958 Provincial wagon
1953 Commander coupe
1957 President 2-dr
1955 President State
1951 Champion Biz cpe
1963 Daytona project FS

bradnree
06-24-2005, 07:27 AM
I have found a street rod company to do the engine swap and ac on a Lark and Loewy, since I am not a mechanic. Brad

DEEPNHOCK
07-10-2005, 07:55 AM
Brad,
Take a deep breath and relax a bit...
I'd like to help you with your quest...(long reply here..)
(Bear with me a bit, but read on as I speak from experience here...)
Studebakers are neat vehicles.
People like them because they are stylish, and they are different.
Studebaker didn't build 15 million of anything (like a mustang or Camaro)...
So that makes them interesting vehicles.
Interesting, but a bit peculiar...
Now, all the magazines put swap pic's and stories of how to 'improve' your car or truck. They do this mainly to promote products sold by their advertisers, whom they derive their income from.
They hype the engine de-jour.
The manufacturers build reproduction parts based on consumer demand.
There is always going to be more repop parts made for a tri-5 Chevy than a Stude.
There will always be more info for a SBC than a Stude.....except for Stude oriented places.
There is an underground network of Stude parts suppliers and even some neat high performance suppliers out there... And the internet has made it a whole lot easier to find them...
So don't count out the unique aspect of a Stude engine in your Stude...
Now.....
Understand that Stude type people are stubborn.
They have had to fix their Stude's all these years without the help of Hot Rod magazine, or Car Craft magazine.
But they keep their stuff running... Sort of a badge of honor.
There is a certain kind of pride involved there.
(Stude's are also simple machines with simple solutions, so a less skilled persons can handle these repairs (a dig a technodinosaurs;))
Now here's where the social aspect comes in to smack you...
The internet has brought with it many forms of communications, and has brought many people together to share in a common passion (in this case...Studebaker[:p])
As with any club or group, these forums draw certain personalities.
Like a corner bar, there are a bunch and you have to find one you are comfortable in.
And just like a corner bar (forum), some will choose to be the cock of the walk in the bar they like to hang out in.
You come in and mention you'd like to do something that the gang at this one bar doesn't like....
Stand by to get the evil eye, then the inevitable comments, and then the verbal pummelling;).
If you take the time to listen to all the comments, and sort throught the information, you may or may not decide to stay and participate in the converstions at this particular bar (forum).
If you hang around long enough, you will learn who's who, and who hangs out where (and why)..
Just like magazines... Why are there so many? Because you gain enjoyment from reading (or looking at pictures)...And your tastes are not the same as others.
Please don't take some of the comments made here as a slam at you personally. Some forum writers are not skilled in diplomacy (read that crotchety SOB's)... Some are brave as heck behind a keyboard and pussies face to face.
Remember, it is YOUR car and you can do what you want with it. They can guid you, help you, criticize you,and crucify you.... But it is still your car.
Most important thing you can do with your Stude?
Build it to an extremely high quality.
Nice work will win over a lot of people.
And drive the damned thing.
The SDC is a great club.
A DRIVER'S club.
You hang in there....
Jeff (a driver of both type's of Stude's) Rice[8D]



[quote]quote:Originally posted by bradnree

I can read at this site why modified cars and Stude street rods are not popular, except in "Turning Wheels" magazine. It sure is fun driving thousands of miles each year in a street rod itstead of looking under the covers in the garage to see if the car is still there--did this, or looking in the barn lot to see how the parked Stude museum is weathering. Let's put Studes on the road by only restoring them to an original driveable condition...not totally restored, and sell them to a new Stude f

oldcarfart
07-12-2005, 09:15 PM
I don't know schitt about engine swaps <grin> but the bigger the better! there is no subsitution for cubic inches!

Alan
07-13-2005, 10:41 AM
Yes there is Fuel injection and hair dryers.

bradnree
07-13-2005, 04:56 PM
Love the humor, better than being so serious.......Brad