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50starlite
06-11-2005, 03:40 PM
My '50 Champion has all of a sudden developed what I believe to be a fuel problem. It may run twenty miles, or a few hundred feet, and then stop as though it has run out of fuel. After it stops running it is hard to restart. I added a in-line fuel filter about 600 miles ago and don't think that's the problem.

Fuel pump, pick-up filter in the tank, vapor lock???

Any help would be appreciated, I'm afraid to leave my garage at this point.

Regards,
Dick

64challenger
06-11-2005, 03:49 PM
These are famous for vapor lock if your missing the fuel pump cover (sheetmetal)it protects the fuel pump from the exhaust manifold/block .they are often missing after fuel pump replacements thru the years

My Studes:
1.1947 Commander 14A-C3
2.1948 Champion 2 door sedan (parts car)
3.1948 Champion 2 door sedan
4.1950 Champion 2 door sedan
5.1959 Lark 2 door post
6.1964 Stude challenger 2 door

curt
06-11-2005, 04:12 PM
I had a Kaiser with similar simptoms...Pick up tube in the tank plugs, car sits and plug works loose, then a repeat of the same.

64challenger
06-11-2005, 04:16 PM
Curts advice makes better sense than mine since the problem just started.

My Studes:
1.1947 Commander 14A-C3
2.1948 Champion 2 door sedan (parts car)
3.1948 Champion 2 door sedan
4.1950 Champion 2 door sedan
5.1959 Lark 2 door post
6.1964 Stude challenger 2 door

Sonny
06-11-2005, 05:23 PM
quote:Originally posted by 50starlite

My '50 Champion has all of a sudden developed what I believe to be a fuel problem. It may run twenty miles, or a few hundred feet, and then stop as though it has run out of fuel. After it stops running it is hard to restart. I added a in-line fuel filter about 600 miles ago and don't think that's the problem.

Fuel pump, pick-up filter in the tank, vapor lock???

Any help would be appreciated, I'm afraid to leave my garage at this point.

Regards,
Dick
Bad news is, it could be any, or a combination of, the problems that you’ve mentioned. I learned the hard way, when you have a fuel problem, do it right, do it all the way. Drop the tank, (they're also famous for the pickup rusting right off), check the pickup, (you can put a new pickup in through the tank sending unit at the top if the old pickup is bad), reseal the tank, thoroughly check and blow out the lines all the way from the back to the front, (especially change all rubber lines and eliminate as many as possible), add a piece of rubber fuel hose entirely surrounding the metal fuel line that goes from the fuel pump to the carb for insulation, make sure that the sheet metal fuel pump guards are in place, open the old fuel pump up, clean out the crud and see if the diaphragm is bad, (the new fuel probably has eaten it up), and last but not least, always run a gallon of diesel fuel with every fill up, (enhances viscosity AND octane, cleans the entire system and almost eliminates vapor locking all by itself).

Having said all that, I've had best luck by removing the old mechanical pump and putting an electric fuel pump on, (it's pretty hard to look cool in a parade when you're pushing your car [:p]) This new fuel sucks soooo bad that I've watched it bubble and evaporate right in the filter, with the car running!!! New fuels require a good strong fuel flow to the carb., have a much lower viscosity, are corrosive, and have much more volatility, (not octane), things that our old fuel pumps were never designed to deal with.

Sonny
http://RacingStudebakers.com

bradnree
06-12-2005, 06:41 PM
I had a tank that went bad with rust floating everywhere shortly after I bought a Lark that had been stored for years but was in good condition. The tank went to pot and I bought a new one--nos from one of the Stude. suppliers. It was double the cost of using a coating repair system from a car parts store but it's done right. I filled three plastic see through filters with rust, ruined the fuel pump, and stalled repeatedly. New tank was the fix. Brad