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cosmo
05-11-2005, 08:53 PM
Does anyone know of an alternator that is interchangeble with a 63, 170 lark. I'd like to install one with 90-120 amps. i didnt really want one with an internal regulator but i will do the re-wiring if i have to. Also i dont want a cinglr wire alternator, i want to stick with a three wire system.

PaulDriver
05-12-2005, 12:59 AM
Try a Delco 12SI ( perhaps from a 83 Camero) which will get you to about 94 AMPS ( http://autozone.com/servlet/UiBroker?UseCase=C001&UserAction=performMoreDetail&Parameters=TRUE%7C%7EALTERNATOR%7C%7E%2430.00%7C%7EDURALAST%7C%7E94+AMP+++++++++ +++++%7C%7EFALSE%7C%7EFALSE%7C%7E91298%7C%7E5725%7C%7EDL7294%7C%7ENONE%7C%7E%246 9.99%7C%7ECHEVROLET%7C%7ECAMARO%7C%7E1983%7C%7ELLT%7C%7ENONE%7C%7ENONE%7C%7EW )

It's a three wire, which is really a one wire with nice features.

http://www.madelectrical.com/electricaltech/remotevoltagesensing.shtml
http://www.madelectrical.com/electricaltech/delcoremy.shtml
http://www.extreme4wheelin.com/tech/alternators/tech.htm

Roscomacaw
05-12-2005, 09:31 AM
While technically it's a 3-wire, it's not gonna be a "bolt-in" replacement for whatever's on his Lark now. There'll be wiring to consider (as in which ones go where - or gets eliminated)
Then you've got to contend with the actual mounting of this foreign (to a Lark) piece. The mount boss will be different as will the adjustment arm setup.
Not trying to throw water on this swap, just pointing out that it's not gonna be without some challenge.;)

Miscreant at large.

N8N
05-12-2005, 10:16 AM
Dave Thibeault sells an alternator mount that works right in place of the stock mount for a V-8, and I believe Lee DeLaBarre is working on having the old Jet City mount repro'd which uses two head bolts and allows you to run the R3 manifolds with a 12SI. (I have one of the latter, will let you know how it works in a few weeks.) Now this doesn't help you with a six; I think to use a 12SI you might have to do something custom, not sure.

Wiring is pretty simple once you understand how it works. I'm using a one wire right now which just necessitated lengthening the big 8 gauge wire to the ammeter to reach the back of the alternator. Throw the harness from the regulator to the alternator over your shoulder :) I would like to convert to a 3 wire if this one dies which would just require a few additional parts. (I like the remote voltage sensing feature of the 3 wire especially with the long wire run to the starter solenoid on a V-8.) I believe that would just require running one wire to the starter solenoid and another to the ignition coil with some kind of diode and/or inline resistor (I haven't quite 100% figured that out yet because the one wire that came with the car is still working fine)

If using a high amperage alternator I would strongly suggest cutting the harness apart and using heavy gauge wire between the alt. and the ammeter and also the ammeter and the starter solenoid. I didn't do that because my car was originally 6V and had 8 gauge wire but the later cars I believe used 10 gauge for V-8s and maybe 12 gauge for a six? definitely not enough to handle the amperage anyway. Also consider using high-amp fuses or fusible links to protect the harness.

Another option would be to use a Chrysler alternator which I believe is similar in mounting to the Prestolite and does use an external regulator. I'm using the 12SI simply because it came with the car and worked; I don't have any experience with the Chrysler unit (but my comments about heavier wire still stand)

good luck,

nate

--
55 Commander Starlight
62 Daytona hardtop
http://home.comcast.net/~njnagel

N8N
05-12-2005, 10:24 AM
One more thought, using the stock ammeter with a significantly more powerful alternator might not be such a good idea if the battery ever goes dead...

nate

--
55 Commander Starlight
62 Daytona hardtop
http://home.comcast.net/~njnagel

cosmo
05-12-2005, 11:13 AM
The thing that i have seen with alot of engines from late 50 - even the early 80's is the parts can be interchangable. cars from the early 50 to the late 60 & 70's alot of parts can be found to match from later years and different manufacuterer. sometimes with modifications sometimes with out. i'm not saying i'd change certain vital parts of my stude, but with kustom in mind i will go the extra mile to find a modern swap that might improve maintanace availability, power supply, performance, whatever.
Thank you for all your help guys

jcstude
05-24-2005, 03:49 PM
Cosmo, another thing to consider is what you will power and how you drive your vehicle. I found that if I crawled along in traffic with a 'one-wire' running a/c, electric fan, electric fuel pump and big amp stereo I might not have enough juice to start that hot motor after stopping at the corner store for a cool one. The one-wire does not produce as much juice at low rpm. I now have an alternator my auto electric shop put together for me that is not a one-wire but has a self contained voltage reg and puts out more amps at idle than the one-wire. It cost me about $120 including the two groove pulley and pig-tail harness. The other issue, already partially addressed is the high amp alternator pumping juice throught the stock ammeter circuit. I replaced my ammeter with a voltmeter to eliminate another source of failure and possible fire under my dash. The voltmeter just hooks into the low current wiring, like dash lights.

Sonny
05-24-2005, 06:53 PM
quote:Originally posted by jcstude

Cosmo, another thing to consider is what you will power and how you drive your vehicle. I found that if I crawled along in traffic with a 'one-wire' running a/c, electric fan, electric fuel pump and big amp stereo I might not have enough juice to start that hot motor after stopping at the corner store for a cool one. The one-wire does not produce as much juice at low rpm. <SNIP SOME GOOD STUFF>


I understood that the good thing AND bad thing about the one-wire was that no matter what rpm, it puts out a flat 13.5, and not much amperage. I think you're right, it would be hard pressed to keep up with a goodie laden car, but it's probably better than the 3-wire at low rpm, (at least to get the charging done). Two thumbs up for, "stopping at the corner store for a cool one"! [^]

Sonny
http://RacingStudebakers.com

N8N
05-24-2005, 07:20 PM
The only difference between the one wire and the three wire is the regulator (if we're talking about a 12SI.) In fact Summit used to sell a kit to convert a boneyard 12SI to one wire operation. The "one wire" regulators are self exciting meaning they don't need the key-on signal to produce voltage. The downside is that they also don't use the remote sensing wire. In a six it might not be such a big deal but in a V-8 where the battery cable connection is quite a few feet of wire away from the back of the alternator I'd personally feel better with the three wire.

That said, I have a one wire in my '55 (because that's what was in it when I bought it) and it seems to be working fine, although I do not have a dash mounted voltmeter to monitor the voltage the ammeter acts about like I'd expect - near full charge after lots of sitting, dropping to a little to the charge side after running a bit. So it seems to be working OK but is probably just not keeping the battery as completely topped up as a three wire would.

The problem with the *three wire* is that it's intended for use with a car with an idiot light; if you don't have an idiot light you need a dummy resistance or something to trick it into working correctly.

nate

--
55 Commander Starlight
62 Daytona hardtop
http://home.comcast.net/~njnagel

studeclunker
05-25-2005, 01:10 AM
Gentlemen. I believe the fellow said he didn't want a single wire. My friend, go down to the local auto supply and by a good quality GM or Delco alternator. You can get an adapter or better yet, look at the local bone yard and take one out of a dead stude. The 63 and 64 studes had alternators. If you want to keep the external regulator that's your choice. As far as the alternators are concerned, that opens a wider number of viable candidates for you.;) Another alternative is the pulley. My mechanic put a double pulley on the front of mine as it sat 1/2 inch too far back. Problem solved.:D Sometimes it pays to ask the help of a good local mechanic.;)

Lotsa Larks!
Studeclunker
A.K.A: out2lunch

JDP
05-25-2005, 03:05 PM
If use use a hight output version of the late 60's MOPAR alternator from Summit racing, it'll bolt right on woth a few flat washers for spacing. One of the dual belt grooves lines right up and you use your stock regulator or the modern solid state version.

Studebaker On The Net http://stude.com
64 R2 4 speed Challenger (Plain Wrapper)
63 R2 4 speed GT Hawk
55 Speedster
50 2R 10 truck

Sonny
05-25-2005, 05:56 PM
quote:Originally posted by JDP

If use use a hight output version of the late 60's MOPAR alternator from Summit racing, it'll bolt right on woth a few flat washers for spacing. One of the dual belt grooves lines right up and you use your stock regulator or the modern solid state version.

Studebaker On The Net http://stude.com
64 R2 4 speed Challenger (Plain Wrapper)
63 R2 4 speed GT Hawk
55 Speedster
50 2R 10 truck


THAT spounds like the best way to go. Too much, "What iz it?", and "How do ya?" with the GM stuff.... I think the Mopar alternator even looks a lot like the Stude alternator too, doesn't it?

Sonny
http://RacingStudebakers.com

JDP
05-25-2005, 07:00 PM
Here's just one of the summit units:

http://store.summitracing.com/default.asp?Ntt=alternator&x=29&y=11&Ntk=KeywordSearch&DDS=1&searchinresults=false&N=0&target=egnsearch.asp

Studebaker On The Net http://stude.com
64 R2 4 speed Challenger (Plain Wrapper)
63 R2 4 speed GT Hawk
55 Speedster
50 2R 10 truck

JDP
05-25-2005, 07:01 PM
Ooops, try again

http://store.summitracing.com/largeimage.asp?part=PWM-17509

Studebaker On The Net http://stude.com
64 R2 4 speed Challenger (Plain Wrapper)
63 R2 4 speed GT Hawk
55 Speedster
50 2R 10 truck