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okiebob
03-06-2005, 08:17 PM
Hey guys, I just bought my first studebaker (yea) The problem is I'm in Oklahoma (okiebob) and the car is in New York. It's a 50 champion starlight coupe, it's about a 1500 hundred mile trip so the question is, have it hauled or drive it. The car is supposably in excellent condition. If I have it hauled does anyone know a trusted hauler. The man I bought it from said about 50-55 was top crusing speed, so I need some opinions. Thanks, OkieBob

Sonny
03-06-2005, 09:32 PM
There's supposed to be transporters out there giving "deals" to Studebaker people, but beware! Just because they can remember your name two times in a row doesn't make 'em Studebaker centric! ;) From the prices I've seen, they're not giving a damn thing special, in fact, their prices are a tad high. Do the research yourself, this is the buyers time of year for car transporting.

Tell ya the best way to do it, (at least it worked very well for me). There are places on the 'Net, (you'll have to "google" for them), where you can post all your information and the transport companies "bid" on your move. You may have to wait for a little while until they have a full load or something of that nature, (if you want the best deal), but I saved about $400.00! The service was great and they brought the car right to my front door. There are thousands of transporters out there, just "google" for "car transporters".

One hint, I did not pay up front, and do NOT use a service that wants payment up front! Many of the services are brokers who get 50 to 100 dollars per vehicle for finding work for the transporters, so they may want that much up front, that's your call but I would very reluctant to pay anything up front. If the car is not running, be prepared to pay more, and some of them might want 100 dollars more, if so, keep looking.

If it were me, I would certainly enjoy the adventure that comes with driving it home! Get spare fuel and water pumps, a $25.00 tool kit, Triple-A card, credit cards, cell phone and have a ball! I've enjoyed those adventures many times. I just finished a 2800 mile trip in a brand-x truck, supposed to be 5-6 days, turned into 9 days, but I wouldn't have had it ANY other way! I really got to see and enjoy this great country. Good luck!


Sonny
http://RacingStudebakers.com

Sam Roberts
03-06-2005, 10:28 PM
Hey Bob,

Use the Studebaker network as others have. Between NY, and Oklahoma, I bet you will never be over 25-50 miles from another Studenut! One guy in Ohio drove a Lark from New Mexico to Ohio, and found help along the way when he had a problem. Carry a Stude roster with you, the tools, and spare parts, like Sonny said and have an adventure. For that matter, have a buddy drive to NY with you, and follow you home, and still be cheaper than a car hauler probably.


quote:Originally posted by okiebob

Hey guys, I just bought my first studebaker (yea) The problem is I'm in Oklahoma (okiebob) and the car is in New York. It's a 50 champion starlight coupe, it's about a 1500 hundred mile trip so the question is, have it hauled or drive it. The car is supposably in excellent condition. If I have it hauled does anyone know a trusted hauler. The man I bought it from said about 50-55 was top crusing speed, so I need some opinions. Thanks, OkieBob


Sam Roberts

62champ
03-07-2005, 01:23 PM
I am voting for the roadtrip. Take a friend and stop at things like 'world's largest ball of twine' type stuff.

I will be driving my mostly original '60 Lark to Pennsylvania in June and am going to take my sweet time. Probably even drive the Natches Trace.

If the car is a staight three speed, then about 55 or 60 is all you might want to do. If it is OD, then 65 and 70 shouldn't be too bad -but it will be a short winded on the hills. My uncle said they used to drive a 1/2 ton pickup with no OD at 70 miles per hour. That little champ motor is pretty tough!

My 7E7 - Restored by my Uncle Denson in 1995
http://www.georgetown.txed.net/faculty/tippit/fuchs/Champ.jpg

Roscomacaw
03-07-2005, 02:33 PM
My advice? IF the car has been driven regularly, you have a good chance of making it with no more than a few minor glitches. Don't start out without a spare fuel pump, water pump, fan belt and rad hoses and the tools to change them. All this should be able to fit in a shoebox - so it won't take up too much room. The fuel and water pumps can cause you to be down while a replacement is delivered in a day or two.[V] Most anything else you might need can be found at an auto parts store. I'm not inferring that these items have a tendancy to fail. They don't. But if one DID crap out, you'll find yourself on the phone to a Stude parts vendor to get a replacement. BTW, if it were me, I'd like to carry a spare starter as well - but I confess that that's a long shot that you'd need one. Besides, you can push start a stick shift car pretty easy. And parking on a slight incline can afford you a way to start by rolling downhill and popping the clutch in a pinch. I've done it a few times over the years when the starter was out or (more likely) when the battery was low!;) (oh - and with an overdrive-equipped car, you MUST pull the O/D handle out to achieve the aforementioned starting methods!)
Do a really through inspection of the car before setting out. If it's been sitting for months, it can show it's temper once you make it get out on the open road![}:)]
Don't do it when you've got to be back to work (or whatever) 3 days after you pick it up. Give yourself time to address any gremlins that surface and not PUSH the old car too hard.[:I]
If it's got overdrive, 65-70 on flat ground should be easy. If you're dealing with rolling terrain, you're gonna be shifting out of O/D when climbing any long inclines.[|)]
Check tires, check brakes, check hoses and belts and ask the seller to tell you very candidly if he knows of any quirks this car has. If he's a good guy, he'll be willing to tell you.
Also - pick good weather if you can. These cars performed year round when they were new. But folks were used to having to deal with the vagaries of vacuum-powered windshield wipers and wimpy defrosters and heaters.
Don't try to drive it like it's a disc-braked rice-burner of 2005 vintage - it's not. Once you learn it's limits, it can be hours of road-cruising pleasure.:D OH! and be ready to wave, smile and be interrogated alot! You won't be driving along in anonymity![:0]

Miscreant at large.

Peter in London
03-07-2005, 04:30 PM
How wonderfully exciting! Takes me back almost 50 years, crossing the States from Atlantic to Pacific (and back) in a Champion. But that was in August '56.
Good luck! :D
Peter.

DEEPNHOCK
03-07-2005, 06:12 PM
There will always be a contingent that loves the adventure of a cross country trip, and the another group that will say tow it, or say have it transported. Having heard stories on both sides of the fence.....(burned up wheel bearings, burned pistons, blown head gaskets... And some great adventure stories...Here's what I would suggest.
A) Have an SDC member you trust check it out
B) Maybe have him prep it for a road trip for you.
C) Spend the first few days driving it locally 'visiting' SDC friends and see how it runs before embarking cross country.
D) Make your trip based on SDC members locations on the way. Best to always have a safe landing strip in sight at all times. Besides, he social action of a trip like that makes the trip even sweeter.
E) Keep your SDC roster in you tool box and spare parts box with your cell phone (as mentioned elswhere in this thread)
F) Take a pocket tape recorder along with you. You can make little verbal notes on your travel stories and review them back home at your 'puter with a cold drink... Easier than writing at 63 mph.
Sounds like it could be fun (eith some pre-trip planning)...
Jeff[8D]


quote:Originally posted by okiebob

Hey guys, I just bought my first studebaker (yea) The problem is I'm in Oklahoma (okiebob) and the car is in New York. It's a 50 champion starlight coupe, it's about a 1500 hundred mile trip so the question is, have it hauled or drive it. The car is supposably in excellent condition. If I have it hauled does anyone know a trusted hauler. The man I bought it from said about 50-55 was top crusing speed, so I need some opinions. Thanks, OkieBob


DEEPNHOCK@worldnet.att.net
'61 Hawk
'37 Coupe Express
http://community.webshots.com/user/deepnhock

okiebob
03-07-2005, 06:44 PM
I like the idea of having someone check the car out. It is located in New Hyde Park on Long Island. Is there anyone who could check it out for me. Thanks,OkieBob

Bandit
03-07-2005, 07:36 PM
When I bought my '51 Champion from Mississippi I was going to run down and haul it back in a trailer but after talking with the guy a few times I decided that we would drive down with the trailer and I would attempt to drive the '51 back under it's own power. Long story short, I had a helluva good time driving all the way back up to Toronto, (about 1500 miles +) !! [8D] I had a spare fuel pump, (one of the likely things to go) and tools, the old girl never missed a beat the whole way and that was before I rebuilt the engine !! It had virtually no compression in cylinders 4 and 5 and the compression in the others was severely down - ha ha. All the thumbsup and high fives I got driving back were priceless. Definitely do it !!!

Oh also, mine doesn't have overdrive so she was a screamer but she cruised along all day long at 50 to 55 mph, I took a lot of secondary highways too - way more fun that way then attempting to run on the freeway with it.

One thing that was kind of a pain though, those damn vacuum wipers - take a lot of Rain-X with you ;)

http://mateo-f4.homedns.org/bandit/banner4.jpg

50starlite
03-07-2005, 10:48 PM
I also went to N.Y. (Clinton) last summer for my '50 Starlight but hauled it back because of time restraints and the fact that the car only had 28K miles and had only been driven 500 miles in the last 13 years. Everything worked on the car except the o.d. (bad relay) but I thought a 1200 mi. trip back to Arkansas would be expecting too much from a 53 year old car, no matter how good it looked. Also, not everyone has a son who hauls cars for a living so my choice was easy. It was a 3 1/2 day round trip. WOW.

If you choose to drive your new love home just BE SURE IT'S SAFE. Have fun.

Dick