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BJsHawk
01-27-2005, 04:29 PM
What type of transmission fluid is recommended for a flightomatic? I have a 1963 Hawk with a flightomatic that I want to change the fluid in. The shop manual says use TYPE A, but that doesn't seem to be available.
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Transtar60
01-27-2005, 05:22 PM
You can either go with Dextron III or the Ford Type F. Make sure you drain the torque converter(see shop manual) and change out the screen/filter while you have the pan off. NAPA has the screen/gasket kit
NAPA # 4-4722. The Ford Type F will give firmer shifts supposedly . I went with the Dextron III and have no problems with it.

BJsHawk
01-28-2005, 08:43 AM
Thanks,
Do you know if the transmission has a vent in the case? After driving for about 100 miles on hot days my transmission leaks but I can't see where it is coming from. I am hoping that new fluid will help because I am not sure of the fluid that is in it but I expect it is a mix of different fluids.

quote:Originally posted by BJsHawk

What type of transmission fluid is recommended for a flightomatic? I have a 1963 Hawk with a flightomatic that I want to change the fluid in. The shop manual says use TYPE A, but that doesn't seem to be available.
[?]

Roscomacaw
01-28-2005, 10:47 AM
It doesn't have a vent. Some transmissions do but not the Stude variety. There's very little airspace in the tranny anyway. And since the tranny fluid doesn't boil, there's no "steam" of a sort to cause problems. Of course, when the fluid gets hot, it thins out and that makes it easier to sneak by a tired seal or loose gasket.
And a mix of fluids won't cause a leak. You need to drive your car until it's fully warmed and then have someone (yourself maybe) inspect the tranny with a flashlight to see if you can discern where the leak originates. There's really only a few places that fluid can escape from - the pan edge or the filler tube nut, the front or rear seals or the seals around the shift and throttle pressure levers. No magic addative or change of fluids is gonna cure leaks longtime. The stuff you add to stop leaks can end up causing more harm in the end. This because they're made to cause seals to swell - not much else. If you add it, you need to change the fluid after driving the car a couple of times or the stuff just keeps growing and growing the seals until they get too big and fail anyway.[}:)]
A better approach would be to get the car up in the air, get under it and snug the pan bolts and check to make sure the filler tube nut is tight. Not BULGE-YOUR-EYES-OUT tight. Just nice and snug. If you're got a torque wrench, you could do it to specification. But a bit of common sense will work as well.;)
I might also mention that if your Stude has a heavy duty automatic, it has a pair of cooler lines that exit the right side of the tranny and go forward to connect to the fluid cooler that's incorporated into the bottom tank of the radiator. These lines (or where they connect) can be a source of a leak as well.[|)]


Miscreant at large.