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Studebaker Wheel
05-15-2010, 01:53 AM
http://i230.photobucket.com/albums/ee285/studeq/From%20the%20Archives/31presburningforum.jpg?t=1273902570

The catalytic converter set the grass on fire and it just went up from there!

Richard Quinn
Editor emeritus: Antique Studebaker Review

Retired
05-15-2010, 02:48 AM
This is what happens when the oil is depleted in the super charger, the heat sets the front wheel flexible hydraulic brake lines afire.

Richard

doug
05-15-2010, 03:23 AM
Wonder what that car would have been worth today?

bams50
05-15-2010, 05:29 AM
I can't imagine what it would have cost to maintain that all these years. It was burned because it had deteriorated so badly, correct?

How tall was that thing anyway? And I always wondered: did the hood open, and did it ever have any kind of an engine?

It would be cool to see one built today, but there really aren't any cars built today that would lend themselves to being made into a giant wood monument very easily[|)]

Robert (Bob) Andrews- on the IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys)
Parish, central NY 13131
http://www.patrioticon.org/images/flag1-1.gif
GOD BLESS AMERICA
Ephesians 6:10-17

BobPalma
05-15-2010, 07:14 AM
quote:Originally posted by bams50

I can't imagine what it would have cost to maintain that all these years. It was burned because it had deteriorated so badly, correct?

Robert (Bob) Andrews


:) Bob: Although it had surely deteriorated, an equal and secondary reason it was destroyed was that the styling was hopelessly out-of-date at a time when styling was changing dramatically from year-to-year, as in the 1950s.

For example, had they created a similar model of a 1951 Commander in 1951, it would have looked somewhat ridiculous when compared with a new 1957 Golden Hawk only six years later.

So The Big President had to go, and that it did in a blaze of glory! [8D]BP

Chantony
05-15-2010, 11:51 AM
I'm pretty sure 1933 was the DEAD line[V][xx(] for the car as the new " Speedway styling" made it look quite dated even though it was a wonderful design in itself.[^]
Pity it wasn't around today in the museum,but I imagine keeping it looking good would have been a major task....even indoors.
I read about it GOING UP years ago,but I have to ask.....
Anybody old enough to remember[?][?]:D:D

A.C.Moisley

Avantidon
05-15-2010, 01:59 PM
That one is toasted. Wonder if they roasted marshmellows around it? Thanks Richard

FlatheadGeo
05-15-2010, 03:53 PM
Isn't that how they destroyed the larger than life mock-up of the car that they used in the ads?

1957 Studebaker Champion 2 door. Staten Island, New York.

rockne10
05-15-2010, 05:28 PM
That [u]IS</u> "the larger than life mock-up of the car that they used in the ads."

Studebaker Wheel
05-15-2010, 07:09 PM
http://i230.photobucket.com/albums/ee285/studeq/From%20the%20Archives/31presrdstrbiglittlecopy.jpg?t=1273964775

The large wooden ’31 President roadster was constructed in the Spring of 1930 to be used in a film short entitled “Wild Flowers.” It stood on a prominent knoll at the Studebaker Proving Ground for six years. It was intentionally set afire on May 17, 1936 (74 years ago this coming Monday). For a comprehensive story on the life and death of this amazing car see my Almanac column in the September 2004 issue of Turning Wheels or the May/June 2004 issue of The Antique Studebaker Review.

Richard Quinn
Editor emeritus: Antique Studebaker Review

raprice
05-15-2010, 07:15 PM
Richard,
Was any part of that mock-up ever saved for posterity?
Rog

'59 Lark VI Regal Hardtop
Smithtown,NY
Long Island Studebaker Club

HAWK64
05-15-2010, 07:16 PM
My goodness, I was one day old when they torched it !!

http://www.studebakercarclub.net/jim.jpg
"QUIGLEY DOWN UNDER"
MELBOURNE.

BobPalma
05-15-2010, 07:34 PM
quote:Originally posted by raprice

Richard,
Was any part of that mock-up ever saved for posterity?
Rog


:) Richard may chime in with additional parts, Rog, but the prominent surviving part is one of the huge "hub caps." It is on display in the new Studebaker National Museum with a story about the Giant President. (In fact, I saw it last weekend when in South Bend for the May Swap Meet.:D)

You might wander around the Museum's website and see if it is in there somewhere; I haven't looked.

The Giant President has two full pages (49 & 50) and four period photographs devoted to it in Andy Beckman's wonderful new, full-color book, "The Studebaker National Museum - Over a Century on Wheels." This gorgeous tome, likely available on line through the museum store, is worthy of an orchestrated hint-dropping campaign around home as Father's Day approaches!;) [8D]BP

Studebaker Wheel
05-15-2010, 08:19 PM
http://i230.photobucket.com/albums/ee285/studeq/From%20the%20Archives/31presbighubcap.jpg?t=1273968727


quote:Originally posted by raprice

Richard,
Was any part of that mock-up ever saved for posterity?
Rog

'59 Lark VI Regal Hardtop
Smithtown,NY
Long Island Studebaker Club

Yes, originally two wheels tires and hub caps as well as the tail light and bracket were saved. The only item currently known to exist is one hub cap. It is on display at the Studebaker National Museum (see photo above). The specially built Firestone tires were originally dumped at the Proving Ground but later contributed to one of the first WWII rubber drives in 1942. I have photos of the two Studebaker employees picking them up and placing them in the back of a 1938 Coupe Express.

Richard Quinn
Editor emeritus: Antique Studebaker Review

Bill Pressler
05-15-2010, 08:47 PM
Richard, I recognize Jeanne Denham in that photo, holding the hub cap. I remember her from when the SNM archives were upstairs in the old Freeman-Spicer building. She reminded me of a good, old-fashioned school teacher...fair, but pretty no-nonsense! I met her husband Bob once too when I was there..he seemed like a good fellow although restrained in comparison with Jeanne! I believe I had heard he was a dentist. Is Jeanne still with us?

Bill Pressler
Kent, OH
'63 Lark Daytona Skytop R1 (sold new by Cordell Motors, Moorhead, MN)
'64 Daytona Hardtop (sold new by Carl E. Filer Co., Greenville, PA)


http://i253.photobucket.com/albums/hh48/newshooter44/44320019-3.jpghttp://i253.photobucket.com/albums/hh48/newshooter44/broadway_filer_oct03-1.jpghttp://i253.photobucket.com/albums/hh48/newshooter44/100_0690_00-1_3.jpg

Chris_Dresbach
05-15-2010, 09:49 PM
I have photos of the two Studebaker employees picking them up and placing them in the back of a 1938 Coupe Express.

Richard Quinn
Editor emeritus: Antique Studebaker Review
[/quote]

I would really like to see that. I did know that some of the tires were saved, but I didn't know that they went to a later use.[?]:)

Chris Dresbach. South Bend, In.
http://i768.photobucket.com/albums/xx323/chris_dresbach/newtiresoncar-1-1.jpghttp://i768.photobucket.com/albums/xx323/chris_dresbach/Studebaker%201/40champion-1-1-1.jpghttp://i768.photobucket.com/albums/xx323/chris_dresbach/Studebaker%201/N10-1-1.jpg
http://i768.photobucket.com/albums/xx323/chris_dresbach/modelNinprogresssortof-1.jpghttp://i768.photobucket.com/albums/xx323/chris_dresbach/myforty-1.jpghttp://i768.photobucket.com/albums/xx323/chris_dresbach/mc-1.jpg
1940 Champion two door. (Restoration in progress)
1952 Model N prototype. (Restoration in progress)
1963 Prototype cart built by Studebaker. (Origional condition)

Studebaker Wheel
05-15-2010, 10:11 PM
Originally posted by Bill Pressler

Richard, I recognize Jeanne Denham in that photo, holding the hub cap. I remember her from when the SNM archives were upstairs in the old Freeman-Spicer building. She reminded me of a good, old-fashioned school teacher...fair, but pretty no-nonsense! I met her husband Bob once too when I was there..he seemed like a good fellow although restrained in comparison with Jeanne! I believe I had heard he was a dentist. Is Jeanne still with us?

Bill Pressler
Kent, OH
'63 Lark Daytona Skytop R1 (sold new by Cordell Motors, Moorhead, MN)
'64 Daytona Hardtop (sold new by Carl E. Filer Co., Greenville, PA)



Jeanne is still with us but she no longer volunteers at the museum. Her husband Bob has passed away.

Richard Quinn
Editor emeritus: Antique Studebaker Review

Studebaker Wheel
05-15-2010, 10:29 PM
quote:Originally posted by Chris_Dresbach

I have photos of the two Studebaker employees picking them up and placing them in the back of a 1938 Coupe Express.

Richard Quinn
Editor emeritus: Antique Studebaker Review


I would really like to see that. I did know that some of the tires were saved, but I didn't know that they went to a later use.[?]:)

Chris Dresbach. South Bend, In.

[/quote]
http://i230.photobucket.com/albums/ee285/studeq/From%20the%20Archives/31presbigtire1942forum.jpg?t=1273976663

These guys really need one of those Studebaker (BIG FOUR ) tire changers.

Those interested in the big '31 should really access the articles I wrote for the TW "Almanac" and Review that I mentioned above. These and many more photos are included.

Richard Quinn
Editor emeritus: Antique Studebaker Review

Chris_Dresbach
05-15-2010, 10:41 PM
Wow, they look like they need a break![:0][B)] I'm surprised that they just left the wheel outside like that.[?] This also has me curious. I remember another giant stude (A land cruiser I think) that was used. What happened to it[?]

Chris Dresbach. South Bend, In.
http://i768.photobucket.com/albums/xx323/chris_dresbach/newtiresoncar-1-1.jpghttp://i768.photobucket.com/albums/xx323/chris_dresbach/Studebaker%201/40champion-1-1-1.jpghttp://i768.photobucket.com/albums/xx323/chris_dresbach/Studebaker%201/N10-1-1.jpg
http://i768.photobucket.com/albums/xx323/chris_dresbach/modelNinprogresssortof-1.jpghttp://i768.photobucket.com/albums/xx323/chris_dresbach/myforty-1.jpghttp://i768.photobucket.com/albums/xx323/chris_dresbach/mc-1.jpg
1940 Champion two door. (Restoration in progress)
1952 Model N prototype. (Restoration in progress)
1963 Prototype cart built by Studebaker. (Origional condition)

Chris_Dresbach
05-15-2010, 10:42 PM
Wow, they look like they need a break![:0][B)] I'm surprised that they just left the wheel outside like that.[?] This also has me curious. I remember another giant stude (A land cruiser I think) that was used. What happened to it[?]

Chris Dresbach. South Bend, In.
http://i768.photobucket.com/albums/xx323/chris_dresbach/newtiresoncar-1-1.jpghttp://i768.photobucket.com/albums/xx323/chris_dresbach/Studebaker%201/40champion-1-1-1.jpghttp://i768.photobucket.com/albums/xx323/chris_dresbach/Studebaker%201/N10-1-1.jpg
http://i768.photobucket.com/albums/xx323/chris_dresbach/modelNinprogresssortof-1.jpghttp://i768.photobucket.com/albums/xx323/chris_dresbach/myforty-1.jpghttp://i768.photobucket.com/albums/xx323/chris_dresbach/mc-1.jpg
1940 Champion two door. (Restoration in progress)
1952 Model N prototype. (Restoration in progress)
1963 Prototype cart built by Studebaker. (Origional condition)

kurtruk
05-15-2010, 10:59 PM
Notice the FIRESTONE lettering on the left rear tire has changed position between the "fire" picture and the "new" picture. Guess maybe they rotated the tires.

KURTRUK
(read it backwards)

EDIT: Upon further review: I guess the left front has also rotated a little bit as well.

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3267/2617723594_889afb71cf_t.jpg http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2184/2267352611_96939dc723_m.jpg http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3286/2679715309_9655c80e5e_m.jpg

Nothing is politically right which is morally wrong. -A. Lincoln

BobPalma
05-16-2010, 07:04 AM
quote:Originally posted by Studebaker Wheel

http://i230.photobucket.com/albums/ee285/studeq/From%20the%20Archives/31presbigtire1942forum.jpg?t=1273976663

Richard Quinn
Editor emeritus: Antique Studebaker Review


:) That's an interesting photo, Dick, since the tire tread is so bright, clear, and easily-seen. If these guys were gathering up the tires for a WWII scrap drive, as has been surmised, those treads would have actually been about ten years old at the time, all of it outside in the harsh St. Joseph County environment.

Yet the rubber looks so well-preserved and fresh, with little visible aging. Given the tire and rubber technology of the day and the age of those treads at the time, I find the condition remarkably good.[:0] I would have expected more cracks and apparent deterioration. Curious. [8D]BP

8E45E
05-16-2010, 10:18 AM
From the National Geographic site:

http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/flashback/2006

Craig

kurtruk
05-16-2010, 08:35 PM
quote:Originally posted by BobPalma


quote:Originally posted by Studebaker Wheel



Richard Quinn
Editor emeritus: Antique Studebaker Review


:) That's an interesting photo, Dick, since the tire tread is so bright, clear, and easily-seen. If these guys were gathering up the tires for a WWII scrap drive, as has been surmised, those treads would have actually been about ten years old at the time, all of it outside in the harsh St. Joseph County environment.

Yet the rubber looks so well-preserved and fresh, with little visible aging. Given the tire and rubber technology of the day and the age of those treads at the time, I find the condition remarkably good.[:0] I would have expected more cracks and apparent deterioration. Curious. [8D]BP


"Low miles," that's why![:o)]:D

Actually, does it appear to anyone else that maybe the carcass or body of the tire was maybe made from wood? Notice the block sections and gaps. Are they just separating the "cap," (as in re-cap) from the wooden body[?]

KURTRUK
(read it backwards)


http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3267/2617723594_889afb71cf_t.jpg http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2184/2267352611_96939dc723_m.jpg http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3286/2679715309_9655c80e5e_m.jpg

Nothing is politically right which is morally wrong. -A. Lincoln