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View Full Version : Tricks to fix dented oil pan?



63t-cab
04-24-2010, 02:29 PM
Without dropping the pan,"I know I could use a mig to spot and pull dent out,but mig is'nt here" so does anyone have another idea for quick fix?

Joseph R. Zeiger

Alan
04-24-2010, 04:01 PM
Get one of those dent puller kits from Harbor Freight. About $90 but you will go crazy for about a month pulling dents out of everything in sight.

StudeMichael
04-24-2010, 06:10 PM
You can also use bondo.

55s
04-24-2010, 08:15 PM
How about using JB Weld to attach something that can be used to pull it out.

Alternately, how about draining it, protecting the threads on the drain hole and trying to pry or tap it down from the inside.

The pan is generally pretty tough and hard to bend.

Normally the pan should be dropped.

Chantony
04-25-2010, 10:57 AM
I've bronzed a rod with a loop on the lower end to the pan,then used a small crowbar to apply leverage against the chassis or bellhousing or wherever it will work.You'll need to drain the oil first,then cut the rod flush with the sump and clean the sump up with a disc.Depending on how nasty the dent is will determine how many goes it takes.
Bondo works okay to finish the job.I've never seen a sump get hot enough to make the bondo come off,so if you want to go that far it should work.

A.C.Moisley

junior
04-25-2010, 12:59 PM
when I was young and dumb, I worked in a tire shop and the boss had me changing the valve springs on his racecar...anyways he had this contraption that threaded into the sparkplug hole that you could connect the airhose up to, it kept the valves from dropping into the cylinders. anyways, he reminded me to drain the oil and leave the drain plug out or i'd blown the pan off...then he added it was the best way to fix a dented pan...still don't know if he was kidding me or not. just a thought. junior

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54 Champ C5 Hamilton car.

woodysrods
04-25-2010, 01:06 PM
Air is a powerfull thing.;)
Good Roads
Brian

Brian Woods
woodysrods@shaw.ca
1946 M Series (Shop Truck)
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Milaca
04-25-2010, 01:10 PM
quote:Originally posted by junior

when I was young and dumb, I worked in a tire shop and the boss had me changing the valve springs on his racecar...anyways he had this contraption that threaded into the sparkplug hole that you could connect the airhose up to, it kept the valves from dropping into the cylinders. anyways, he reminded me to drain the oil and leave the drain plug out or i'd blown the pan off...then he added it was the best way to fix a dented pan...still don't know if he was kidding me or not. just a thought. junior


I changed my valve stem seals last year and had to put an air hose adapter in the spark plug hole for each set of valves to keep the valves in the closed position while I removed the retainer clips. I had a huge dent in my oil pan before I began and still had the same dent when the job was completed. :D

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2736/4478293868_83da2fe493_t.jpg
Love birds...Red Hawks in mating season.
In the middle of Minnestudea

Joe Flannery
04-25-2010, 09:07 PM
I put a dent in my pan when I was installing an engine in my 1956 R series pick up. I was installing it alone and and I had the crane up as high as it would go. I put a dent in the pan sliding it across the heavy duty radiator support. Just enough that it was causing a rod to hit the pan. I thought I had a rod knock in my new engine.
My friend Pete is a body man. He came to my house with this neat body shop tool that welds a small stud to sheet metal and then you use a slide hammmer to grip it and pull it out. It worked on house current 120 V .
Do you know anyone in the autobody business ? It worked great and Pete had it done and the engine quiet in no time.

1963 Super Lark clone

Chantony
04-26-2010, 08:58 AM
That stud tool is called a Rothenberger Dent kit ( electric) or Spitznagel,depending on the brand you use.You can also get one that welds a washer to the panel on its edge so it can be gripped by a slide hammer.If you use one of these tools that many panel shops have,the secret is not to hold the trigger too long or you can melt the stud/washer through the panel,then you are in big trouble.I've done sumps successfully with them and some panel shops will do it for a relatively small fee.
Junior,that tire boss was pulling your leg.The air has to get past the rings and that isn't easy.Any blow by will get into the sump,but will come out of the pushrod holes,so no pressure can build up in the sump.The pushrod and all breathing holes would have to be completely blocked for pressure to build in the sump.It's a bit like sending the apprentice out for a can of compression.It's a good story though.Thanks.

A.C.Moisley