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StudeRich
02-24-2007, 01:15 AM
Trying not to be rude, but...if I did not know what a temp. sending unit looked like, I think I would look it up in the Shop Manual under 289 Engine. Or I would simply follow the only ORANGE wire in the car, from the unit to the Temp Gauge and prob. solved! :)

StudeRich
Studebakers Northwest
Ferndale, WA

studelover
02-24-2007, 01:17 AM
In the back of my engine the gas pedal linkage is bolted to this thing that goes into the motor, two bolts hold it, does the rebuild kit have this part in it , what's it called? it has a wire connected to it.

Studebakers forever!

JDP
02-24-2007, 01:42 AM
Water temp sender, not part of any rebuild "kit".

64 Commander 2 dr.
64 Daytona HT
63 R2 4 speed GT Hawk (Black) #2
63 Avanti R1
63 Daytona convert
63 Lark 2 door
63 Lark 2 door #2
62 Daytona HT/ 4 speed
62 Lark 2 door
62 GT Hawk 4 speed
60 Lark HT
60 Hawk
59 3E truck
52 Starliner
51 Commander

blackhawk
02-24-2007, 11:21 AM
quote:Originally posted by StudeRich

Trying not to be rude, but...if I did not know what a temp. sending unit looked like, I think I would look it up in the Shop Manual under 289 Engine. Or I would simply follow the only ORANGE wire in the car, from the unit to the Temp Gauge and prob. solved! :)

StudeRich
Studebakers Northwest
Ferndale, WA
I suggest you grab a cup of coffee and chill out. There is no gain in jumping on Studelover like that. Dale

JDP
02-24-2007, 11:33 AM
I feel bad that he is buying a "rebuild kit", most I have seen packed as a kit were way over priced. I buy rings, rods mains, a gasket kit, freeze plugs and cam bearings for around $400-$500 and I'm good to go on most rebuilds.

64 Commander 2 dr.
64 Daytona HT
63 R2 4 speed GT Hawk (Black) #2
63 Avanti R1
63 Daytona convert
63 Lark 2 door
63 Lark 2 door #2
62 Daytona HT/ 4 speed
62 Lark 2 door
62 GT Hawk 4 speed
60 Lark HT
60 Hawk
59 3E truck
52 Starliner
51 Commander

Dwain G.
02-24-2007, 12:54 PM
Hmmm, temp. sender. My guess was going to be that 'studelover' was seeing the accel. linkage bell crank with an overdrive kickdown switch mounted on it.

http://home.comcast.net/~jdwain/63.63.jpg
Dwain G.

monomaniac
02-24-2007, 01:48 PM
I agree with you Dwain. Only I didn't know it was called a bellcrank.

StudeRich
02-24-2007, 04:06 PM
On V-8's the Throttle Bellcrank partially covers the adapter plate that screws to the Cyl. head to cover the hole in the head used on the front ends of the heads for the water manifold. It has a hole in it to screw the Sender into, '51-'56 models had a large Sender, '57 or '58 changed to a small one, that fits other makes. One of those 2 screws studelover mentioned also holds the Bellcrank. So the clue here is, that he said: "it goes into the engine" ! [^] O.D. Kickdowns are exposed, OUTSIDE of the engine.

rockne10
02-24-2007, 10:30 PM
I thought, if the gas pedal was connected to it, it was the accelerator bellcrank.

Just today, a friend of mine spent an hour cleaning one for his 259 M5. When he showed it to me I thought it looked funny; it was bent wrong, so I pulled the one I had taken off my 289 out of a box and told him to spend an hour cleaning it.

studelover
02-24-2007, 11:01 PM
Now just imagine I took everything a loose. I have never seen a 289 studebaker engine, all the sending units I have on my cars have bulbs. I guess when you have a brain of great size. You can't see what idiots like me find difficult. The unknown is interesting. I just got back from Atlantic city, great car auction, to find your lovely post.

Studebakers forever!

gordr
02-24-2007, 11:52 PM
quote:Originally posted by studelover

Now just imagine I took everything a loose. I have never seen a 289 studebaker engine, all the sending units I have on my cars have bulbs. I guess when you have a brain of great size. You can't see what idiots like me find difficult. The unknown is interesting. I just got back from Atlantic city, great car auction, to find your lovely post.

Studebakers forever!


Don't get your knickers in a knot, studelover. Here is your original post: "In the back of my engine the gas pedal linkage is bolted to this thing that goes into the motor, two bolts hold it, does the rebuild kit have this part in it , what's it called? it has a wire connected to it."

It's not exactly the clearest question in the world now, is it? "Thing that goes into the motor", that really tells us a lot, eh? Maybe if you had taken the time to type: "a threaded brass plug with an electrical terminal, screwed into a diamond-shaped plate on the back end of the left-hand cylinder head" you would have gotten a less sarcastic answer. It is of course the temperature sensor, and similar sensors are still in use today. They are a very common item, and have been for decades (not to imply that the exact one used in Studebakers is common, but the general pattern is still in use).

Really, it's OK not to know what a certain part is, but if you are going to ask a question, please try to be as descriptive and as accurate as you can when you frame the question. Your original post looked like it was just begging for a wise crack in response, and somebody took the bait. Could have been me, but it wasn't[}:)]

By the way, if you need a new sending unit, I believe the major vendors have them. Unless you know the old one is faulty, just clean it up and re-use it.

Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

studelover
02-25-2007, 11:08 AM
Ok am so sorry I will try to be more discreptive the next time. The left hand threaded,diamond in the back,brass backward..what! Even if I would have gotten my two college educated childern down here to write it, it would not sound like that.We don't speak with that kind of diction(round here)I just described it the best I could.I must have gotten my point across you knew what it was didn't yea! Thanks!;)

Studebakers forever!

GTtim
02-25-2007, 12:38 PM
Gordon, I always admire your carefully worded responses. I do believe though, that even a poorly worded question doesn't deserve a rude response. Maybe, when you are sitting face to face and can give some cues to help smooth things over, but on the impersonal internet things sometimes end up sounding harsh. So let's try to be nice to all questioners. Having said that, the more effort that someone puts into their question, the more likely it will be that they get useful responses. I have read many threads where someone didn't take much time in the asking and a lot of ground was covered about the wrong topic because of that.

Tim K.
'64 R2 GT Hawk