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Studebaker Wheel
03-12-2010, 04:42 PM
http://i230.photobucket.com/albums/ee285/studeq/DSCF1214.jpg?t=1268433622

<center>1937 Trucks 6'3" inches wide X approx 4' high</center>

Richard Quinn
Editor emeritus: Antique Studebaker Review

Milaca
03-12-2010, 05:06 PM
Spectacular Richard! That doesnt belong in an attic, it should be encased in glass with an oak frame and hung on my living room wall. ;) The 'Heavy Highway Series' tandem axle truck caught my eye being that tandem axle trucks were not very common back then. My favorite it the cab-forward gravel truck but all are very interesting. I especially like the amount of varying colors used. Perhaps you should make your attic into a museum and allow club members to visit. Would you prefer money or beer for admission? ;)

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2491/3963476412_7a12ba7be0_t.jpg
Autumn at Lake Barget
In the middle of Minnestudea

scott.rodgers
03-12-2010, 05:07 PM
Wow - those are some neat Cab-forwards!

Scott Rodgers
Los Angeles
SDC Member since 1989
'60 Lark HT
'63 Wagonaire
'66 Frankenbaker

rockne10
03-12-2010, 06:36 PM
I'll take...one of those and...one of those and...one of...

I really like the second "Light Commercial" model. Bet they sold a ton of those.[:o)]

HAWK64
03-12-2010, 06:50 PM
Dick,
Todays dreams & yesterdays facts once more on the Studebaker Forum. Thanks for the posting.

http://www.studebakercarclub.net/jim.jpg
"QUIGLEY DOWN UNDER"
MELBOURNE.

Invalid User Name
03-12-2010, 06:51 PM
I can't believe how great the colors look after all these years. What a find.

Doug
Venice, Florida
1950 Champion
9G F1
http://i100.photobucket.com/albums/m15/w4jdz/Stu-1.jpg

garyash
03-12-2010, 08:03 PM
Those are great pictures, but I suspect that they were the dreams of the designers. While I recognize some of them from real photographs, I wonder how many of them never got build at all. Too bad, they look great! The Art Deco period was good for car and truck design.

I think I counted about 45 different versions. Are there photos of real examples of the milk/bread/vegetable trucks, the high-lift coal trucks, the "SUV", and the various panel vans?

[img=left]http://www.studegarage.com/images/indy/gary_indycar25_vvsm.jpg[/img=left] Gary Ash
Dartmouth, Mass.
'32 Indy car replica (in progress)
'48 M5
'65 Wagonaire Commander
'63 Wagonaire Standard
web site at http://www.studegarage.com

289stude
03-12-2010, 10:32 PM
Hey Gary I was just checking out that coal truck. I was offered an M series coal truck and passed. I didn't really know exactly what made it a coal truck but now I'm wondering if it was a high lift. Were coal trucks typicaly high lifts?


John

62' Deluxe R2 4SPD.

63' R1 Wagonaire

57' Transtar 259 punched to 312 NP540 4:09 TT Under Construction

58' 3E6D Stock

64' (Studebaker Built) Trailer Toter

http://i126.photobucket.com/albums/p99/289stude/62R2-3.jpg

5859
03-13-2010, 02:03 AM
That really is a complete line!

Skip Lackie
03-13-2010, 06:46 AM
quote:Originally posted by 289stude

Hey Gary I was just checking out that coal truck. I was offered an M series coal truck and passed. I didn't really know exactly what made it a coal truck but now I'm wondering if it was a high lift. Were coal trucks typicaly high lifts?


John




Coal trucks were virtually always high lift. Deliveries were often from alleys that were quite a distance from the coal shute in the house or apartment building. The driver had to assemble a shute connecting the dump bed to the building's shute. Coal doesn't flow as easily as water, so the slope had to be pretty steep. In the big old cities of the Eastern US, residential coal delivery hung on into the very early 70s.

Skip Lackie
Washington DC

fstst56
03-13-2010, 04:00 PM
Art-Deco at its finest!

comatus
03-14-2010, 11:04 AM
Coal truck drivers have a long-running dispute whether the bed floor should be steel or wood. My driver and his Pa. mine-tip buddy began such a discussion at Camp Van Dorn Miss. in 1943, and have not resolved it yet. The argument-ender has always been, "Wooden bed, wooden head!"

Could this pattern be transferred to fabric? It would make inspiring wallpaper for a grandchild's room (you listening, Bob?), or a Truck Farmers' jumpsuit for the ages. I would wear that to church on Easter. With bells on.