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3x2stude
02-12-2010, 01:32 PM
Me again. Is it possible to modify the stock flywheel and crank on a Stude V8 to allow the flywheel to be bolted from the transmission side?

What are the pros and cons on using an aluminum flywheel? Is the long stroke stude tourquey enough to compensate for the tourqe lost from going to aluminm?

Jon Kammer

tbredehoft
02-12-2010, 01:35 PM
Remove the crank from the car, tap it fine thread the next largest size, drill the flywheel to accommodate the appropriate screws, put lock-tight on the screws and you're good to go. Use grade 8 screws.

[Edit] As a retired toolmaker, it never occurred to me that one would try this without proper machinery. Do not try this at home.

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Tom Bredehoft
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Allan Songer
02-12-2010, 01:38 PM
quote:Originally posted by 3x2stude

Me again. Is it possible to modify the stock flywheel and crank on a Stude V8 to allow the flywheel to be bolted from the transmission side?

What are the pros and cons on using an aluminum flywheel? Is the long stroke stude tourquey enough to compensate for the tourqe lost from going to aluminm?

Jon Kammer


I did this on the last two Stude V8s I built. Used ARP SBC flywheel bolts. I had the machine shop drill and tap the crank-it's a precision job and it has to be pretty much perfect. I think they charged me $40 extra for this.

It's a GREAT modification, by the way.

PackardV8
02-12-2010, 01:47 PM
Yes, the crank flange and flywheel can be drilled and tapped for larger bolts.

No, don't do it on the garage floor with a hand-held power drill. The holes in the flywheel should enlarged using a reamer for final close fit to the new bolts. Likewise, the holes in the crank need to be straight and exact diameter for the new threads to hold properly. I've seen one really botched job where I couldn't in good conscience re-install the crankshaft in a customer's engine. When the crankshaft came back from being cleaned and re-ground, I looked closely at the threads in the flange and some holes were oval. The owner chose to be insulted at having the quality of his hand work questioned. I've seen a driver lose a foot to an exploding flywheel, so I loose-assembled the engine, sent it back to him and took the loss on the project.

No, an aluminum flywheel doesn't reduce torque, but does reduce rotating inertia. A search here will find pages upon pages of vociferous arguments about the pros and cons of aluminum flywheels. Bottom line, an aluminum flywheel does not change horsepower or torgue, but its lower rotating inertia allows the engine to gain or lose revs quicker.

Maybe, you should spend the next week reading all the previous posts and decide for yourself.

thnx, jack vines

PackardV8