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View Full Version : So I tried the Tremclad with a roller technique...



tstclr
02-04-2007, 08:10 PM
And am AMAZED at how well it turned out. I tried a test area on a junk Lark fender. I have to admit I rushed things a bit just to see what the results might be. I bought a litre of Tremclad black (apparently same as Rustoleum in the U.S) and some mineral spirits. I bought a bunch of high density foam rollers at the doller store. I poured a bit of the paint into a measuring cup and added about 25 percent mineral spirits and stirred. I poured it into a small roller tray and applied. You get tons of bubbles but they pop with a light blow). I waited about 5 minutes and rolled over my work again with the roller without any more paint added. The next day I added a second coat- same method. I sanded with 500 grit wet sandpaper and did another two coats. I sanded with the 500 again and added another two coats. After 6 coats I sanded with 1000 grit and polished with Turtle Wax polish and my orbital buffer. I kid you not the paint looked FACTORY (actually better as there was no orange peel at all). Perfectly smooth. If I had taken the time to do a perfect prep job on the fender, and bought better rollers, applied a couple more coats and perhaps used 800 grit between coats and splurged on a wool buffing wheel I think the results would be VERY hard to distinguish from a high quality single stage paint job. I'd take photos but my digital camera doesn't have the resolution to truly show how well it turned out. It is also extremely hard and would not scratch with my fingernail. The mineral spirits allow the paint to harden quicker. If I continue with my 63 resto, I am going to paint the trunklid with this method since I have an NOS spare as a backup. If I am as pleased with the results as I was with my test piece, I'll continue and do each panel separately. Some guys on the Mopar forum where this technique came to light seem to have mixed results with Rustoleum. Even though the mfgr says it is the same as Tremclad, I have my doubts as my results look quite a bit better than some of those pictured.

Todd



63 Lark 2dr Sedan
http://i31.photobucket.com/albums/c351/tstclr/larkavitar.jpg

monomaniac
02-04-2007, 09:24 PM
Rustoleum and Tremclad are both brand names manufactured by different companies and are NOT the same thing. Both are available in Canada. They are 'similar' paints in that they both claim to be rust-preventative. The Rustoleum company was originally Dutch (may still be) and years ago claimed that Rustoleum was used on ships - BELOW THE WATER LINE.
When I first heard about Rustoleum you could buy it only in red oxide primer or black. Today, check out Home Depot and see it in many, many colors.

tstclr
02-04-2007, 10:19 PM
They are both made by the same company. Check out www.rustoleum.com and click on the Canadian flag.
Todd


63 Lark 2dr Sedan
http://i31.photobucket.com/albums/c351/tstclr/larkavitar.jpg

54-61-62
02-04-2007, 11:47 PM
When I was at Todd's I smelled his drying Tremclad - I can tell you for certian it is not the same as Rustoleum here in the states.

Kent

John Kirchhoff
02-04-2007, 11:56 PM
In the good old days Rustoleum contained fish oil, although what kind of fish I don't know. But then again, that was back when Kal Kan had whale meat in it too.

monomaniac
02-05-2007, 09:33 AM
The last time I bought some Rustoleum (has to be several decades ago), Tremclad and Rustoleum were competing brands. We always considered Rustoleum a better product but what did we know. Now it looks like Rustoleum bought out Tremclad (at least in Canada).
Thanks for the info.

dictator27
02-05-2007, 12:37 PM
I know a guy who painted his car hauler trailer with a mixture of Tremclad and premium gas!!![:0] He said that by rights he shouldn't be here because he had a cigarette hanging out of his mouth as he sprayed the trailer![8] The trailer is still around, the paint still looks good and is damn near bullet proof.:)

Terry

dictator27
02-05-2007, 12:48 PM
Another thought. It used to be that you could not repaint over Tremclad with standard auto paint. Its antirust qualities prevented normal paint sticking to it.

Terry