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53k
01-17-2007, 09:57 AM
quote:Originally posted by 65cruiser
...I've had Maaco do three of my cars over the years and have always been satisfied with the results. That said, any car of mine they've ever painted, I prepped prior to the paint. I've always removed all the chrome, lights, etc. Now, this isn't a windows out type of paint job, and there was a certain amount of cleanup that went into the car afterward. For for a grand or so, what gives? I'm not looking for a show car, just a really nice, serviceable, daily driver paint job. ...

You do the prep work, you can get very good paint jobs at the high volume places. They paint cars all day long- get pretty good at it. As I posted to the Studebaker NG earlier, Back in 1963 I had a '54 Willys Aero Ace two-door. It had some minor rust and the paint was faded. A man who worked for me told me to do all the prep work, take off the bumpers and take it to Earl Scheib when they had a weekend deal. I did and I got a good paint job for $19.95- had to settle for a single color that was close to original vice the original two-tone, but so what...




[img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/R-4.JPG[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/64L.JPG[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/64P.jpg[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/53K.jpg[/img=right]Paul Johnson
'53 Commander Starliner (since 1966)
'64 Daytona Wagonaire (original owner)
'64 Daytona Convertible (2006)
Museum R-4 engine

65cruiser
01-17-2007, 10:13 AM
I'll soon be reaching the point where my Cruiser is going to need a new paint job. Since it's a daily driver, it's picked up its share of nicks here and there. I'm pretty diligent about keeping things touched up, but the car was last painted in 1996 so it won't be long now. Don't get me wrong, I still have a great driver paint job--definitely not show, but a really nice 10 footer. In reading Dick Steinkamps post about wet sanding, I even think I could do a little bit of detailing and get by another year or two. But, recently I hit a muffler that came slinging across my driving lane. That got kicked up into the rear quarter and dinged the edge of the lip. That fender also has a bit of rust starting at the top corner, so I'm going to replace that quarter and spot paint. The estimate just for the spot paint was $250-300.

That said, I've begun an early exploration of my options. Shelling out $3-4000 for a paint job isn't going to happen. I'm not looking for a show paint job, but don't want crap either. I've seriously thought about taking some adult education courses in auto painting and doing it myself--I don't think it would be that darned hard.

But, here's my question. If you can take a decent paint job and wet sand it to smooth it out, what's so bad about taking a car to Maaco and getting it painted, then detailing it yourself. For around a grand, they'll do a basecoat/clearcoat job, with warranty.

I've had Maaco do three of my cars over the years and have always been satisfied with the results. That said, any car of mine they've ever painted, I prepped prior to the paint. I've always removed all the chrome, lights, etc. Now, this isn't a windows out type of paint job, and there was a certain amount of cleanup that went into the car afterward. For for a grand or so, what gives? I'm not looking for a show car, just a really nice, serviceable, daily driver paint job.

Inquiring minds want to know[:p]

________________________
Mark Anderson
1965 Cruiser
http://home.alltel.net/anderm

http://home.alltel.net/anderm/images/smstude.jpg

Dick Steinkamp
01-17-2007, 11:02 AM
I'd go for it Mark. You'll pick up some new skills at the adult ed class AND you'll save a bunch of money and have the satisfaction of participating in the process. You might consider replacing the door seals and other rubber at this time if it is starting to wear. It's tough to mask and really makes the paint job "pop" to have the new rubber.

Here's how I'm getting my '63 Hawk repainted. Kinda lucked into this one. A friend of a friend is a young guy who graduated from WyoTech
http://www.wyotech.com/auto-body-repair.php and worked for a couple of years for a custom/hot rod shop here. They couldn't keep him busy enough and so now he's a carpenter. He really loves the body and paint and does some beautiful work. I'll blow the car apart (started yesterday), and he'll "let me" sand the door jambs, engine compartment, and other places like that. He wants to block out the car himself to insure it is perfect. He'll paint it (he has access to a pro booth), I'll color sand and buff and reassemble it. This will be a show quality base coat/clear coat. Materials will be right at $1000. He estimates he'll have about 100 hours into blocking the car and shooting it (very minimal body work needed). I'll post progress pictures. If this relationship works out, I've got a couple of other cars in the wings that would benefit from the same treatment. We'll see.


http://thenobot.org/images/s2d/s2d_01.jpg

CHAMP
01-17-2007, 12:44 PM
One hundred hours, whats his hourly rate?

GARY H 2DR.SEDAN 48 STUDEBAKER CHAMPION NORTHEAST MD.

ddub
01-17-2007, 01:21 PM
I have also done the Maaco bit. I did some prep work, they painted. I replaced the trim. Turned out very ssatisfactory at a reasonable price. I wouldn't call it show quality but entirely satisfactory for a car that I planned to drive.

That said, if our local college offered a body work and painting course I would enroll. I think it would be very satisfying to be able to do this work. I suppose you can learn this on your own but I think the curve is both long and steep.

Don Wilson
53 Commander Hardtop
64 Champ 1/2 ton
Centralia, WA

DEEPNHOCK
01-17-2007, 02:02 PM
Well, you get what you don't pay for...
Without getting into the roller, brush, and vacuum cleaner paint jobs...
A good BC/CC paint job can run you somewhere in the neighborhood of $1500 just for materials.... You can spend several hundred hours in good prep work too.
That all adds up quick.
The Maaco thing can be a good deal if you do the 200 hours of prep work yourself.
But it will be a driver paint job at best.
Jeff[8D]

http://i77.photobucket.com/albums/j54/deepnhock/Jeff%20Rice%20Studebaker%20Pictures/1937StudebakerCoupeExpressJeffRicee.jpg

DEEPNHOCK at Gmail.com
Brooklet, Georgia
'37 Coupe Express (never ending project)
'37 Coupe Express Trailer (project)
'61 Hawk (project)
http://community.webshots.com/user/deepnhock

65cruiser
01-17-2007, 02:22 PM
See, that's what I want to know--what makes that a "driver" paint job (not that there's anything wrong with that)? If you do the prep yourself, then wet sand and buff afterward, it seems to me you could end up with a very decent paint job.

Maybe I just don't know the difference between "show" and "driver". I'm cornfused.


quote:Originally posted by DEEPNHOCK

[b]Well, you get what you don't pay for...
Without getting into the roller, brush, and vacuum cleaner paint jobs...
A good BC/CC paint job can run you somewhere in the neighborhood of $1500 just for materials.... You can spend several hundred hours in good prep work too.
That all adds up quick.
The Maaco thing can be a good deal if you do the 200 hours of prep work yourself.
But it will be a driver paint job at best.
Jeff[8D]

http://i77.photobucket.com/albums/j54/deepnhock/Jeff%20Rice%20Studebaker%20Pictures/1937StudebakerCoupeExpressJeffRicee.jpg

DEEPNHOCK at Gmail.com
Brooklet, Georgia
'37 Coupe Express (never ending project)
'37 Coupe Express Trailer (project)
'61 Hawk (project)
http://community.webshots.com/user/deepnhock



________________________
Mark Anderson
1965 Cruiser
http://home.alltel.net/anderm

http://home.alltel.net/anderm/images/smstude.jpg

Dick Steinkamp
01-17-2007, 03:28 PM
quote:Originally posted by CHAMP

One hundred hours, whats his hourly rate?


Cheaper than a shop :D.

He will have 100 hours into it. I'll probably have 200+.


http://thenobot.org/images/s2d/s2d_01.jpg

KGlowacky
01-17-2007, 04:32 PM
Well here is my two cents. After owning a shop for years (no longer)no one can determine what you are going to get from any shop. The prep work is extremely important. I have seen pretty good jobs come out of Maaco and I've seen terrible also. One of the big differences with Maaco and other cut rate shops is the quality of paint and the prep.. The spraying of it is based on the years of training and experience of the painter (really isn't much to it). I have actually done the following. Do the prep, take it to let's say Maaco and either bring them the better quality paint or have them get it at the extra cost. Do a clear coat/ base coat, (maybe and extra couple coats of clear so you can buff)have them buff it and then take it home for your final buffing and polishing. I believe unless you are extremely unlucky with the painters skills you will get a quality paint job for a really cheap price. Also the difference in a driver paint job and a show paint job is not always money. Again, prep, paint, skills and your own hard work. Also a true show quality paint job is in the $8,000-$12,000 range down here in Texas. Most paint jobs in a small shop around here are $3,500 -$6,000. I would not say they are SHOW QUALITY guaranteed (you might get one). Good Luck and let us know how it goes.

DEEPNHOCK
01-17-2007, 04:36 PM
You are asking some good, pertinent questions.
It is hard to stick a universal label on a paint job.
If you have a $100k car, you aren't going to skimp on the paint job.
But if you have a $1K Stude, you probably aren't going to opt for a $6k paint job. I do believe the difference is in the prep labor.
Paint and material costs are fairly constant, so the amount of labor involved will be the big ticket item. Sure, a pro shop will have the equipment, and knowhow to whip a project through... But most of the Stude crowd are not in a hurry. I know I'd rather spend twice as long making each part of my project 'right' than pay someone big dollars to just hurry through it because the boss has a schedule to keep.
If I had a decent Stude, I'd put the best paint job on it I could afford, even if I had to borrow to do it. I just went through the second paint job on my yellow truck, and it was harder for me to let someone else do the work. But I remember the tedious pain and agony of months of prep work, and then not being really happy with my home done paint job. Well, I could probably say the same for some aspects of the pro job that I just got... But it is still better than what I had before. Oh, I postponed that paint job for better than two years saving up for it. I could have bought a couple decent Larks for what it cost... But, to me...It was worth it (as long as it last's 100 years;)) If I had a decent 'driver' Stude... I'd probably just do the first 90% of the prep work, and then let Maaco finish the final prep and paint. I'd still hang the trim and stuff..
Jeff[8D]


quote:Originally posted by 65cruiser

See, that's what I want to know--what makes that a "driver" paint job (not that there's anything wrong with that)? If you do the prep yourself, then wet sand and buff afterward, it seems to me you could end up with a very decent paint job.
Maybe I just don't know the difference between "show" and "driver". I'm cornfused.[B)]
Mark Anderson

65cruiser
01-17-2007, 05:13 PM
[xx(]This is some good info I'm getting here. I've always thought that most of what makes a good paint job is in the prep work, and I have no problem with doing labor. However, most shops I've talked with first just don't want to fool with an all-over paint job. They'd rather do collision work and collect their money from the insurance company. The ones I've spoken to that WOULD entertain a complete paint job, want to do it on their terms, their timeframe and want anything from $3500 up. I'm just not going to put that kind of money in a Studebaker that's worth $6000 on a GOOD day. But again, I don't want a piece of crap either. That said, I've had three cars painted by Maaco, a 1966 Econoline, a 1983 Chevy Wagon and a 1977 Pontiac Grand Lemans. All were nice, decent paint jobs that you could be proud of. I wouldn't enter any of them in a Concours[8D] but they were at least as good as what the factory produced. I only had one of these vehicles long enough to see how the paint held up, and that was the Lemans. I paid $700 for that job (several years ago[^]) and that included them stripping the hood, trunk and roof. I sold that car two years ago after it had sat outside behind my garage for 5 years. The paint was all there, and still shined nicely (except for the large dent in the side that put the car behind the garage to begin with:().

So....you've answered a bunch of questions. It sounds like IF I were to explore the Maaco route, I need to do extensive prep, and possibly supply my own paint. Besides that, I need to check out work that they've done in the recent past to see what that looks like.

Or, I'm going to learn to do it myself[B)][}:)][V]



________________________
Mark Anderson
1965 Cruiser
http://home.alltel.net/anderm

http://home.alltel.net/anderm/images/smstude.jpg

Kdancy
01-17-2007, 05:38 PM
I personally would be leary of painting a vehicle that some one else has done the prep work on. I would need to have confidence that the prep person knows what they are doing. Very good quality paint isn't cheap and it's only going to be as good as the prep work and materials used to do the prep work. If the paint lifts or fades, who gets the blame? (I'm re-painting a Lark now that was painted, looked very good, but I found rust underneath the almost fresh paint. I'm having to strip the entire car and start over.)
Having said that, on a vehicle that doesn't have a lot of value, doing the prep work yourself and just letting macco or like company spray the paint on would be the cheapest way to go.

KGlowacky
01-17-2007, 05:54 PM
Just to add. Go down to Maaco or any other shop and look at the current work on a couple of diff. visits. You can reasonably expect yours to look like what you see. The only diff. would be the quality of the body work. (prep) Also, I agree that doing your own prep is going to void any warrenty that may exist. But again the cost savings should balance this out.

Dick Steinkamp
01-17-2007, 06:32 PM
Maybe a couple of other pros can throw in their 2 cents worth (I'm NOT one), but one word of caution. "Prep work" isn't just sanding the car and putting a little putty here and there. Pros are pros because of the training and experience in prepping (and painting cars). There is a BIG difference between a pro prepped car and an owner prepped car...not only with how the paint will last, but also how the paint will look. The Adult ed course thing is a great idea and will help a lot I'm sure, but don't expect your first prep for paint to be as good as a good pro would do.

http://thenobot.org/images/s2d/s2d_01.jpg

65cruiser
01-17-2007, 07:12 PM
Hey, a guy over on the Mopar group painted his Charger with a roller and Rustoleum--looked pretty good too....

No, I'm NOT going to do that[}:)]

Sounds like I need to find some good adult classes.


quote:Originally posted by Dick Steinkamp

Maybe a couple of other pros can throw in their 2 cents worth (I'm NOT one), but one word of caution. "Prep work" isn't just sanding the car and putting a little putty here and there. Pros are pros because of the training and experience in prepping (and painting cars). There is a BIG difference between a pro prepped car and an owner prepped car...not only with how the paint will last, but also how the paint will look. The Adult ed course thing is a great idea and will help a lot I'm sure, but don't expect your first prep for paint to be as good as a good pro would do.

http://thenobot.org/images/s2d/s2d_01.jpg



________________________
Mark Anderson
1965 Cruiser
http://home.alltel.net/anderm

http://home.alltel.net/anderm/images/smstude.jpg

50starlite
01-17-2007, 08:26 PM
Didn't our Studebakers come new with a "Drivers Paint Job"? At least mine did.:D

Dick
Mountain Home, AR
http://livingintheozarks.com/studebaker.htm

65cruiser
01-17-2007, 08:33 PM
Actually, the paint on mine right now is probably better than what the factory put on it.

So that means, that show paint is non-factory, so you'd lose points at the judging level--right[}:)]?


quote:Originally posted by 50starlite

Didn't our Studebakers come new with a "Drivers Paint Job"? At least mine did.:D

Dick
Mountain Home, AR
http://livingintheozarks.com/studebaker.htm



________________________
Mark Anderson
1965 Cruiser
http://home.alltel.net/anderm

http://home.alltel.net/anderm/images/smstude.jpg

50starlite
01-17-2007, 08:39 PM
Mark-
That's kinda where I was going, but.....;)

Dick
Mountain Home, AR
http://livingintheozarks.com/studebaker.htm

Randy_G
01-17-2007, 09:35 PM
Not to long ago I stopped by a what I call a "real" paint and body shop, you know the guy he isnt in it for the collision work. I go by there daily and see everything from Mustangs to Lotus's sitting outfront getting a complete glass and interior out paint job. So I pulled in one day to ask about project #1 and he told me that his starting price was $3500.00 and that was with me just telling him about the car sight unseen. He had alot of little rules as well that if I didn't agree to there would be no warranty on his work.[B)]

These rules wouldn't affect a a paint job on a Studebaker since they are almost all metal. I would have had to replace the nose and rear bumper of the car because they are plastic/rubber stuff. Very expensive, So project #1 is getting its new engine right now, paint is along ways down the road. If you have had a good experience with Maaco then I would take your car back there. keep us posted. Take pictures you know how me and Leonard love to look at them!

Randy_G
www.AutomotiveHistoryOnline.com
http://www.automotivehistoryonline.com/small59.jpg

avantilover
01-18-2007, 02:25 AM
quote:Originally posted by hotwheels63r2

the only way you can cut and rub a cheap job, is to be sure they put enough material on it. If they do not, you'll be doing it over when you sand through..

As far as the prep, I can't explain it here. Do more shopping, then make the call.


I do some painting and if you email or call, I could give you many tips and advice.

MIKE
I saw in a recent (to Australia) Hot Rod magazine on body work and painting an article about a "Pro" who worked for George Barris and restored a '53 Mercury custom by Larry Shinoda. They mentioned that he went over the car checking panel fit and doing repairs etc then prepared and painted the car. The major point was preparation preparation preparation, then you get a good job.

John Clements
Avantilover, your South Australian Studebaker lover!!!
Lockleys South Australia

PackardV8
01-18-2007, 08:16 AM
Greetings, All,

Most high-end shops will not guarantee the paint a car someone else has prepped. Unless you have painted a few, you have no idea of how many seemingly minor problems can ruin a paint job.

For instance, one Stude guy I know spent weeks stripping and block sanding his Avanti. He was stunned when the paint shop said, "Come and get it. The fibreglas is contaminated with silicone." Turns out, his teenage son detailed his own muscle car in the same garage, spraying "Tire-Black" silicone on the tires, bumper, spoiler, vinyl top and window rubber trim. The mist drifted over on the Avanti and when it was painted, $1,000 of paint dried with "fish-eyes" all over it. The shop had wiped it down with thinner, as usual, but it is almost impossible to get silicone out of bare fibreglas.

Ask a million questions, take a course, visit shops. Mistakes are epensive and ugly for a long time.

thnx, jv.

PackardV8

CHAMP
01-18-2007, 09:12 AM
When I worked at a Olds-Honda Dealership as a mechanic they had a Pinstriper come in once a week to hand paint pinstripes on new cars and we could not use any spray silicone while he was there.

GARY H 2DR.SEDAN 48 STUDEBAKER CHAMPION NORTHEAST MD.

John Kirchhoff
01-18-2007, 10:10 AM
The problem with a really great paint job is that all it takes is one pokeberry eating bluejay to poop on the hood and you have a permanent purple stain. I had that happen shortly after getting my Hawk years ago. The paint job was decent and the brown or whatever color that is on Dick Steincamp's GT Hawk and I was left with a 1-1/2 inch purple ring that refused to come out. I've seen some of those terrifically beautiful paint jobs before and they're on cars that are taken to a show, rolled out of a trailer, a rope barrier is set up to keep anyone from breathing on the paint, it starts to sprinkle rain and the car gets rolled back into the trailer, engine never started once. To me, needing to handle your car like a crystal vase is no way to enjoy your car.

I look at it this way; if you have an ego that requires people to ohh and ahh over your car everywhere you go, then by all means you need that 6k paint job, 4k rechrome and 3k interior plus whatever it takes to actually make the car drivable. But if you're going to actually drive your car in all kinds of weather, on gravel roads, park in a parking lot with other cars, don't worry about taking it to a car judging and live where you have bluejays and pokeberries, blowing thousands of dollars on a paint job is overkill.

This is rather embarrasing to admit considering all the other posts, but after rolling the Hawk, I did all the body work and painted it with $22 gallon tractor enamel from the local farm store. I'm in no way trying to brag about my work, but several people that saw it afterwards had favorable comments on the paint and never suspected the roof had been mashed in nearly 12 inches. As has been mentioned previously, the prep work (such as multiple coats of wet sanded primer) is the secret. $200 gallon paint on a poorly prepped surface is going to look cruddy and $20 gallon paint on a properly prepped surface is going to look perfectly acceptable for a car that one actually wants to drive and enjoy. When I paint the '51, it's going to get the same treatment. The tractor enamel is tough and since it's very resistant to oil and fuel spills, purple bird poop isn't such a big deal. And if gravel chips barf up the paint, you can get the same paint in a hand held spray can and repair the problems. I can't afford to have everything rechromed or have a super duper professional paint job that people drool over, but I'd rather be driving the car with adequate paint and chrome than having it set in the shed forever while I try to save up for the good stuff. That way, any extra money can go to redoing the interior, stereo, better brakes and fixing up the '51.

tstclr
01-18-2007, 01:31 PM
Here's the Rustoleum with a roller thread.Beware-it will take you about 6 hours to read all 80+ pages on this thread. That has to be a thread record~[:0]
http://board.moparts.org/ubbthreads/showflat.php?Cat=0&Number=2331682&page=0&fpart=1&vc=1

Todd

63 Lark 2dr Sedan
http://i31.photobucket.com/albums/c351/tstclr/larkavitar.jpg
64 Daytona 4dr Sedan
http://i31.photobucket.com/albums/c351/tstclr/64daytonaavitar.jpg

JBOYLE
01-18-2007, 03:44 PM
A couple of ideas:

My boss (not a car guy!!!)took his daily driver (a 90s Crown Vic just pulled out of a granny's garage) to Maaco because its paint was peeling on the roof and the previous owner parked by feel. He's happy with the results.

A friend took his late-80s Mustang convertible to the local community college and they painted it for FREE as a class project...he just had to buy the materials. Came out a good 5 footer.



63 Avanti R1 2788
1914 Stutz Bearcat
(George Barris replica)

Washington State

Swifster
01-21-2007, 11:31 PM
I don't mean to beat a dead horse, but obviously the prep is important. If you're going to class to learn, paint it yourself. Those types of classes will have access to the materials and the equipment. It will cost you class fees, material cost and your labor. And when you've finished, you've gained the experience.

Maaco can be a double edged sword. Yes, if you do the prep work, you might get a decent job at a reasonable price. You might also get a headache. It all depends on the painter. Many a Maaco gets their painters straight from school and they continue learning on your car. A friend had Maaco do a couple of his cars, and he figuired he couldn't do any worse. While the first few times where far from a high end paint job, he's definitely got better with each job.

Which brings me back to the start. Take a class and do it yourself.

By the way, you didn't get into the details of the rust on the quarter panel. If this is just bubbling under the surface, and not rotted thru, I'd see how bad before buying a new panel. I'd also have both quarters pulled and have the new paint 'edged' in prior to having the exterior refinished. This will also allow you to see and clean up any minor problems in the seams before laying down the fresh coat of paint.

Pull as much of the car apart as you can. Yank the windshield, any exposed rubber, tail lamp housings, grille, bumpers, door handles, etc. Taping this stuff off will just creat problems down the road.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Tom - Valrico, FL

1964 Studebaker Daytona

http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i280/Swifster/Studebaker%20Stuff/StudeRear198x131.jpg http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i280/Swifster/Studebaker%20Stuff/StudePlate-Single197x100.jpg http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i280/Swifster/Studebaker%20Stuff/StudePlate-FL197x100.jpg

Swifster
01-22-2007, 01:31 AM
quote:Originally posted by hotwheels63r2

All the 62-66's I have seen that had that bubble in the top of the quarter panel, had rot behind it and down on the dogleg. Most are full of some small holes or even completely rotted off, so take a welding class too.




Or buy another quarter panel...[:I][:o)]:D

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Tom - Valrico, FL

1964 Studebaker Daytona

http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i280/Swifster/Studebaker%20Stuff/StudeRear198x131.jpg http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i280/Swifster/Studebaker%20Stuff/StudePlate-Single197x100.jpg http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i280/Swifster/Studebaker%20Stuff/StudePlate-FL197x100.jpg

65cruiser
01-23-2007, 11:07 AM
NOS quarters are still available and cheap. I can't believe the time to R&R a rusty panel would be less than a new panel.


quote:Originally posted by Swifster


quote:Originally posted by hotwheels63r2

All the 62-66's I have seen that had that bubble in the top of the quarter panel, had rot behind it and down on the dogleg. Most are full of some small holes or even completely rotted off, so take a welding class too.




Or buy another quarter panel...[:I][:o)]:D

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Tom - Valrico, FL

1964 Studebaker Daytona

http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i280/Swifster/Studebaker%20Stuff/StudeRear198x131.jpg http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i280/Swifster/Studebaker%20Stuff/StudePlate-Single197x100.jpg http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i280/Swifster/Studebaker%20Stuff/StudePlate-FL197x100.jpg


________________________
Mark Anderson
1965 Cruiser
http://home.alltel.net/anderm

http://home.alltel.net/anderm/images/smstude.jpg

Roscomacaw
01-23-2007, 02:04 PM
Packard V8 writes: " Turns out, his teenage son detailed his own muscle car in the same garage, spraying "Tire-Black" silicone on the tires, bumper, spoiler, vinyl top and window rubber trim. The mist drifted over on the Avanti and when it was painted, $1,000 of paint dried with "fish-eyes" all over it."

When I had the ragtop painted about 4 or 5 years ago, my guy spent MUCHO hours prepping the car for it's new coat of Jonquil yellow. The night before he was to paint it, we drove it to a shop in town that was gonna rent us it's booth to shoot the car the next day (Saturday).
What we could NO WAY anticipate was that a discharged (and therefor disgruntled) ex-employee would illegally enter the shop that very night and spray Armor-All all around the shop to screw up the cars the shop was prepping for paint!
The miscreant had not sprayed any directly on the ragtop so you could not see it prior to painting.:( Of course, we were flabberghasted once the paint went on and the car started to look like the surface of the Moon!
Given the circumstances, the shop wasn't liable (I felt bad for the guy that owned the business! I only had ONE car to think about!) and the butthead had left town the night of his tirade.
Another stripping, prepping and painting is "all" it took to make it right!:(:(:(

Miscreant adrift in
the BerStuda Triangle
http://images.andale.com/f2/115/106/906179/2006/12/7/truckonhill3.jpg

1957 Transtar 1/2ton
1960 Larkvertible V8
1958 Provincial wagon
1953 Commander coupe