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Milaca
10-02-2009, 01:27 PM
Has anyone installed a gas tank from a late model vehicle into a Studebaker car or truck? The inside of the tank on my '63 Wagonaire is reeeeally rusty. It could likely be cleaned and coated, but a used late model replacement might be more feasible. If the replacement tank is made of poly, that would be even better.

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3473/3939471781_afa477b3ae_m.jpg
Brent's rootbeer racer.
MN iron ore...it does your body good.

ST2DE5
10-02-2009, 03:29 PM
To bad you missed SASCO I bought one for $190 NOS Last may. Bolted right in. I have found a bunch for C-Cabs that go in where the spare goes. But none for cars.


7G-Q1 49 2R12 10G-F5 56B-D4 56B-F2

rockne10
10-02-2009, 07:32 PM
quote:It could likely be cleaned and coated
No likely about it. A lot cheaper than replacing with new (if available) or re-engineering a late model to fit.
Available kits make it easy to do yourself. Old school radiator shops can do it for you. The high end is sending it to one of the franchisees who specialize in it.

Brad Johnson
Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
http://s57.photobucket.com/albums/g233/rockne10/Rockne/th_Rocknegauges.jpg'33 Rockne 10, '51 Commander Starlight, '53 Commander Starlight "Désirée"

mbstude
10-02-2009, 07:38 PM
When I bought my '58, it had been sitting 35 years with no gas cap. The tank was full of rust and what looked like engine sludge. Not being able to find another tank, I cleaned mine out, CASO style.

I bought 5 gallons of laquer thinner. I dropped 25 pounds of bolts, nuts, and chain into the tank and poured in about a gallon of the thinner. Sloshed it around until my arms got tired. Poured it out, and did the same thing over again several times. After I had used up the 5 gallons, I put the water hose in the filler neck and let the tank fill up, eventually it ran out of the sending unit hole. I let it "flush" for half an hour and came back to find nothing but shiny, bare metal on the inside.

I've probably put 5000 miles on that car in the past 6 months with no fuel related problems whatsoever.

Matthew Burnette
Hazlehurst, GA

rockne10
10-02-2009, 08:03 PM
That's what I'm talking about![8D]

If you end up with some pin holes, do a little brazing or JBWeld, Eastwood sealing kit if necessary.

JeffDeWitt
10-05-2009, 09:41 PM
quote:Originally posted by rockne10

That's what I'm talking about![8D]

If you end up with some pin holes, do a little brazing or JBWeld, Eastwood sealing kit if necessary.


I wouldn't do any brazing or welding on a used gas tank, that could get FAR too exciting for me!

Painting the tank with POR-15, putting on a layer of glass cloth, and re-coating with POR-15 has worked very well for me.

Jeff DeWitt
http://carolinastudes.net
http://i132.photobucket.com/albums/q33/Jeff_DeWitt/IM001571-1.jpg

rockne10
10-05-2009, 10:09 PM
quote:I wouldn't do any brazing or welding on a used gas tank, that could get FAR too exciting for me!After it's been cooked, cleaned and flushed there should be no fumes to ignite. Common sense prevails; lack of common sense improves the gene pool.:D

57studesilverhawk
10-08-2009, 02:49 PM
If you are "brave" and use common sense, a very well cleaned out tank can be welded, brazed , soldered, HOWEVER you must hook up a exhaust hose to the tank and let the carbon monoxide work, & keep the car or truck running--- dispelling oxegen,all the time that you are welding or use a flame torch, as this is also risky, it must be done in a well ventalated area, preferably out side or we might find out that the Club has lost another member.It would not be good to find out that the holes are repaired but the worker is in no shape to need the tank any more.

Evan
http://i623.photobucket.com/albums/tt311/evanesco_2009/Aug2109Hawk004-1.jpg

Milaca
10-08-2009, 03:15 PM
After a gas tank has been thoroughly cleaned & flushed, I wouldnt be afraid to weld on it. If for some reason a couple of drops remained in the tank and ignited, the welding helmet will protect me from a flash of fire that might come out. [:0] Besides, having driven my stock 1963 Hawk through Minneapolis freeway traffic at 75 mph is probably riskier to my well being. [8D]

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3473/3939471781_afa477b3ae_t.jpg
Brent's rootbeer racer.
MN iron ore...it does your body good.

jjones
10-08-2009, 07:14 PM
You might look at www.KBS-COATINGS.com. Not to expensive and their tank clean and repair kit worked great for me.

http://i243.photobucket.com/albums/ff17/jeffhelen/DSCF1042.jpg
Jeff Jones
Tucson Arizona
1947 M-5

TX Rebel
10-08-2009, 11:56 PM
The Gas Tank Renew process is great if you have the $$, but glad 2-c an alternative. Personally, I
just flush out with lacquer thinner like Matt, and if not too rusty inside, slosh in the sealer after taping over any small pin holes or applying POR15 to larger ones.


Barry'd in Studes

Jeff_H
10-09-2009, 10:32 AM
I've successfully soldered on gas tanks (with gas in them!) using a heat gun. This is not without some risk, but its safer IMO than any torch.

60/40 solder flows at ~187 deg C or thereabouts. Gasoline fumes ignite at ~232C. Also, the fumes will only ignite if the air/fuel ratio is in the correct range; not too lean or rich.

The nozzle temp of the heatgun is likely hotter than 232C but here is the key: Plug up the tank neck and position the tank with the pinhole to be soldered ~up~ so its dry. There should not be much if any fuel vapors outside of the tank. Work in a ventilate area. If you work carefully with the heatgun and use good flux, you won't need to heat the tank any more than the solder melt temp, which is under the gas ignition temp. This is easy to do since the tank will soak the heat away quickly. The heatgun won't provide as much or as hot a heat as a torch so its much more gentle. Also, the tank is full of fuel vapor that is likely much too rich to burn ~inside~ the tank anyway even if it were hot enough.

I've resoldered cracked fitting joints this way and pinholes from rust a couple of times with no problems at all. Maybe I am just lucky, but I don't do this sort of thing without due caution. Wear gloves and eye protection.

Jeff in ND
http://i156.photobucket.com/albums/t5/ee-engineer/devilstowerthumbnail.jpg
'53 Champion Hardtop

curt
10-09-2009, 03:24 PM
I have been told after a cleaning , no fumes; let the tank sit and there will be fumes;these fumes can light,bang. I don't know from experience, just what an old welder told me.

Milaca
10-09-2009, 03:26 PM
I've heard that a healthy spark will get rid of any fumes. Is this true? :D

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3473/3939471781_afa477b3ae_t.jpg
Brent's rootbeer racer.
MN iron ore...it does your body good.

4-speed wagonaire
10-12-2009, 02:49 AM
Uper, in a flash....it will also remove that unsightly nose and ear hair.....

Bill, Many Fords and one great Stude!

leyrret
10-12-2009, 05:32 AM
If the tank is clean bare metal inside it can be repaired after air drying with say a shop vac. If there is rust inside be very careful as tank will dry but the rust will leach fumes and likely explode if no precaution is taken. A buddy had one explode. It jumped about 5 ft in the air and split wide open, but fortunately missed him.

rickhmn
10-12-2009, 10:32 AM
An additional note to cleaning the tank. I have used sheetrock screws with great success. Chain the tank to the wheel of the tractor and go out for a day of field work. No more rust. Muratic acid has worked real well too on a couple of motorcycle tanks. Just be ready to coat it immeadiately or it will flash rust. I agree that the tank could be evacuated with a shop vac. Leave the sending unit out so that there is a big hole for anything to blow out and keep it running during the repair and there should be no issues. I'd go for the coat of fibergalss though. Seals the whole bottom at once. Has anybody tried electrolytic rust conversion?

Milaca
10-12-2009, 11:11 AM
Hi Rick, I do have a box full of sheetrock screws (man those things are sharp!) and I have a tractor, so I may just try that. By the way, do you know a fellow Stude collector by the name of Ray Johnson of Duluth? Just curious, he's a really nice guy that I've met at a couple of shows this summer.

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3473/3939471781_afa477b3ae_t.jpg
Brent's rootbeer racer.
MN iron ore...it does your body good.

studeguy
10-12-2009, 04:52 PM
Here's an old-fashioned fix that should work for any car. When I was a teenager, I would stop at the neighborhood garage to learn as much as I could about cars. Their fix for holes in a gas tank was simple: They used a couple of old soldering irons....the kind that you heat up with a torch until they are hot (then turn the torches off, please). They would then use soft solder with the hot torches to melt the solder into the holes. No flame was needed, and it worked.