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Jimmie
10-01-2009, 08:16 AM
If it is God's will I will soon be putting the new headliner in my 50 Champion. The bottom side of the roof was sandblasted and now it sounds like a drum when I close a door:(. What have others found to be satisfactory in this area. When I bought the car back this time, much of the old original material was laying on and discoloring the "new" headliner which I had put in 1988. I do not want this to happen again if I can help it.

Also, I want to replace the similar looking material inside the doors since most of it came off while the doors were being restored-would the same material be used for this as for the headliner?

:)Thanks to anyone who has had experience in this area who can help me with this project.:)

Jimmie
Orange County, Indiana http://i467.photobucket.com/albums/rr35/n9prz/th_RedStudebaker.jpg
1950 CHAMPION -ORANGE COUNTY, INDIANA

4961Studebaker
10-01-2009, 08:22 AM
if you want to pay for it.....Dynaliner 1/8, 1/4, 1/2, peel and stick sheets

ChopStu
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141 weeks till completion.

wolfie
10-01-2009, 08:23 AM
I think the factory used a cardboard based liner of sorts. I would use a rubberized spray-on undercoating personally since it will be covered up anyway. I have never used it in exactly this application but have used it inside doors etc... and noticed a tremendous difference in road noise after spraying the floors of a noisy brand-X truck I had. You can buy cans of the stuff at your FLAPS. Steve

http://i287.photobucket.com/albums/ll160/wolfie_53/T-cabhoodsprings015.jpg

vegas paul
10-01-2009, 09:55 AM
ChopStu's suggestion is great, the Dynaliner sticky foam works well. However, try some Dynamat against the sheet metal, with Dynaliner over it. There are also other generic (cheaper) equivalents. Basically, the Dynamat is sticky (peel 'n stick) rubber with foil backing, about 1/16" thick which dampens vibrations. Then the foam over this provides acoustic AND thermal insulation. I used it for the headliner, floor, inside door panles, basically everywhere, and the difference was enormous.

Las Vegas, NV - Stop by, coffee's on!
'51 Champion Business Coupe G899965 10G-Q4-1434
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clarkwd
10-01-2009, 10:31 AM
I used FatMat on the roof my Speedster and on the rust bucket I am now rebuilding. Stuck down good and does the noise job.
http://www.fatmat.com/kits/fatmat/door.html
Bill

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http://www.rustyrestorations.org/coppermine/

jclary
10-01-2009, 11:14 AM
Take care to investigate the long range characteristics of whatever you select. For example, a good modern undercoating material stays pliable and never really hardens...unlike the old stuff that would harden, crack, and eventually hold rust incubating moisture. The problem with newer gummy type undercoating is that due to the extreme temperatures setting in the sun...it could liquefy, run, and bleed through your headliner. Also, make sure any adhesive backed material is heat resistant so that it does not turn loose and drop down on the headliner. Good luck with it. Sorry I am better at telling you what to avoid than what to use.


John Clary
Greer, SC
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Life... is what happens as you are making plans.
SDC member since 1975

fred k.
10-01-2009, 11:14 AM
How about lizzard skin, sprays in good for sound and heat.

fred

KGlowacky
10-01-2009, 04:13 PM
I used dynamat for part of the car and then went and bought a copy cat roll (dynamate look alike)on e-bay from Canada. about 1/3 the price. seems to work the same.

289stude
10-01-2009, 09:58 PM
I'm gonna use that contractors grade (silver) double bubble with some heavy duty adhessive under my headliner, and also along floors and firewall. Possibly in the doors also. It is super light easy to work with works well and is cheap.


John

63' R1 Wagonaire

63' 8E45 Detroit

53' 2R5 R1 Powershift TT Under Construction

57' Transtar 304 NP540 4:09 TT Under Construction (in Picture)

58' 3E6D Stock

59' 4E2 122 Scotsman Deluxe V8 4spd curb side fender

61' 6E7 122 Factory Auto

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62SY4
10-01-2009, 10:34 PM
I would stay away from undercoating, I was in a pinch my local supplier of dynamat was out of stock and the upholsterer was coming to put my headliner in, so I did the old school thing and sprayed 3 quarts of 3M body Shutz on the underside of the roof, boy I am I ever dissappointed. Sounds like a tin can when I close the doors and it is hell in a hard rain, almost deafening.

Jon Krimm
1962 Lark Sedan
http://i542.photobucket.com/albums/gg440/62SY4/carstude.jpg
1961 Champ

Milaca
10-01-2009, 10:41 PM
I dont recall the price per roll, but any lumber yard or home improvement center has a .02 inch thick butyl rubber flashing tape (6 inches wide is common) with a white polyethylene film backing. This is very sticky and is used on homes for sealing around doors & windows. I havent used it for sound deadening, but if one layer isnt enough, you could add a second layer on top. Anyone ever try this stuff for sound deadening?

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Brent's rootbeer racer.

tbredehoft
10-01-2009, 11:00 PM
I got some stuff from Menards' about 1/16th thick, mobile home roofing repair type stuff. Very thin white aluminum on an asphalt type base with peel & stick paper on the back. 36 inches wide and 33 feet long, $79 on sale. The entire inside of my cabin (55 Pres Sedan) is lined with it. Mine is .06 thick, (nominally) three times as thick as the stuff above. I cut the tin can effect to about 40% of what it had been rain can still be heard, but it looks clean and sounds pretty good. Of course it's all covered up now, but it still is doing its job.

[img=left]http://www.alink.com/personal/tbredehoft/Avatar1.jpg[/img=left]
Tom Bredehoft
'53 Commander Coupe (since 1959)
'55 President (6H Y6) State Sedan
....On the road, again....
'05 Legacy Ltd Wagon
All Indiana built cars

Jimmie
10-02-2009, 12:20 AM
quote:Originally posted by 62SY4

I would stay away from undercoating, I was in a pinch my local supplier of dynamat was out of stock and the upholsterer was coming to put my headliner in, so I did the old school thing and sprayed 3 quarts of 3M body Shutz on the underside of the roof, boy I am I ever dissappointed. Sounds like a tin can when I close the doors and it is hell in a hard rain, almost deafening.

Jon Krimm
1962 Lark Sedan
http://i542.photobucket.com/albums/gg440/62SY4/carstude.jpg
1961 Champ
Jon-
Thanks for the warning. Someone else seemed to think that it might bleed onto the headliner too.

Jimmie

Jimmie
Orange County, Indiana http://i467.photobucket.com/albums/rr35/n9prz/th_RedStudebaker.jpg
1950 CHAMPION -ORANGE COUNTY, INDIANA

5brown1
10-02-2009, 08:18 AM
Google "EZCool". Lots of hot rodders use the stuff. On Lubrocrod's
(I may have spelled that incorrectly) web site there are examples of tests done on the stuff. Reasonable price also.

Roscomacaw
10-02-2009, 10:55 AM
I bought some foot square sound deadener panels (adhesive-backed) from the local auto body supply place. $33 for 6 pads, IIRC. They're called Q-Pads (Q for quiet I guess). I stuck 6 of them on the bare undersides of the Cruiser's roof and I gotta say I'm un-impressed with their noise quelling ability. I'm thinking about trying something else before I put the headliner up.:(

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1957 Transtar 1/2ton
1963 Cruiser
1960 Larkvertible V8
1958 Provincial wagon
1953 Commander coupe
1957 President two door

54champ
10-02-2009, 03:56 PM
This subject was covered, repeatedly and quite thoroughly I think, on another site I'm a member on. It ended up with one member testing Dynamat and the sound deadeners found at Lowes or Home Depot, the backing used by upholsterers and carpeters, jute based sound deadener backed with aluminum sheet, and the type with alum sheet on both sides. He had them tested for both sound and heat reduction. Each subject was tested with extreme heat exposure, microscopic sound bombardment tests, and flexibility for installation. The differences were so minute as concerns sound deadening that his labs advice was to simply look for the best deal on price. The heat absorbtion or repulsion tests pointed to the ones with aluminum sheets on them to better do the job and the ones with alum sheets on both sides were only minimumly better than the ones with sheets on one side. The testers did say that the ones with alum on bothsides were easier to handle and install. They could be cut into small pieces to get into the tight corners and crevices, they could be put on in one-piece sheets that cover the length of the headliner with only one or two pieces. They did say though, that the spray on adhesives seemed to hold much tighter to the ones with alum sheets than to the others. The final conclusion was that no one single piece was clearly better than any other, at least not enough so as to make the price differences logical. In other words, use what type you want, the alum sheet type seems nominally better, but the big pricey name brands are not measureably better than any other they found. I personally found a man at a car show that had a truck load of the stuff with alum sheets on each side and bought a roll from him (enough to do 5 cars so far, and hopefully 6) for $40. I've been pretty happy with the effects I get when I use it; much quieter car, no tin-canning when I hit a bump or close the doors, much, much cooler interior after putting it in doors, quarter panels and headliner. Just thought I'd let you all know what was found on that site, just after we'd beaten the horse to death.

Jerry

tluz
10-02-2009, 04:38 PM
I read a report similar to the one Jerry quotes from that reached similar conclusions, except warned people off products that contain asphalt in the "sandwich" between the alum sheets. These products are really made for construction purposes, not automotive ones, and inside a closed car on a hot day the asphalt tends to melt, lose shape, and smell terrible. If I recall, the report found HushMat and DynaMat to be virtually identical in performance and that Lizard Skin was close.