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Roscomacaw
08-11-2009, 08:10 PM
I'm reducing my 61 Cruiser to parts. This has been the plan for some time now and while I ought to be working on the '63, circumstances wriggled around to where I'll get this task out of the way first.

I was gonna get the underpinnings out of it and let the scrap trio redeem the leftovers at the scrap yard. In fact, they were sposed to be here early this AM and they never ever showed. After walking around it twice, I figured I might's well just strip it and keep everything that's worth something. I have the space and the county's not after me at the moment......

So I've been working at it little by little thru the day. It's slid past 100 and did so about noon, so I work a bit and refresh in the house alot. Thought at one point as to how hard it would be for me to establish a web cam so the progress could be observed my others. I've got the fixin's, but not the savvy. So anyway....

AM
http://imagehost.vendio.com/a/30906179/aview/CruiserAM.jpg

PM
http://imagehost.vendio.com/a/30906179/aview/CruiserPM.jpg

http://imagehost.vendio.com/a/30906179/aview/Cruiserfloorboards.jpg

This last pic tells a bit of the tale of why Studebaker went under. When you have to remove the welded in body brace behind the rear seat AND THEN chisle two holes in the floorboards to facilitate changing the rear shocks, well, you can see how that might affect the attitudes of owners and mechanics alike.[V]

http://imagehost.vendio.com/a/30906179/aview/CruiserBrace.jpg

1957 Transtar 1/2ton
1963 Cruiser
1960 Larkvertible V8
1958 Provincial wagon
1953 Commander coupe
1957 President two door

silverhawk
08-11-2009, 08:27 PM
That some good progress. RIP lark, at least you are giving away some nice parts. Did that passenger side front fender used to be a NOS one? Its afully nice.

Dylan Wills

'61 lark deluxe 4 door wagon

jimmijim8
08-11-2009, 08:36 PM
Biggs, sure was a rust bucket. not jimmijim

hotrodstude
08-11-2009, 08:53 PM
would you be interested in selling the brake/clutch assy.and all the linkage that goes with it??? my e-mail is on my profile thanks charlie

2006,f-150,2x4,v-6,5-speed manual,8ft bed, will post stude info when i get it on the road.

ChampTrucking
08-11-2009, 09:42 PM
Look at that floor I would DIE to find in any midwest used car!!!

Steve T
08-11-2009, 09:51 PM
Yeah Rich...I was thinking the same thing...certainly miles better than the "metal quilt" floor in my '62! Maybe the Cruiser can end up donating those bits too...

S.

BobPalma
08-11-2009, 09:59 PM
quote:Originally posted by ChampTrucking

Look at that floor I would DIE to find in any midwest used car!!!


:) Real Estate and The Collector-Car Hobby have three things in common, Rich: Location, location, location!

Sad to consider the fact that it would cost a solid $1,000++ to get that dry floor structure, and the car to which it is attached, to South Bend.[V] :DBP

candbstudebakers
08-11-2009, 10:00 PM
Bob you worked on the easy parts, lets see how fast you can get the fenders off the front ones first, then strip it down to a bare frame...Bob

Bob Peterson / C & B Studebakers

Castro Valley, CA
canbstudebakers-

]http://i691.photobucket.com/albums/vv271/canbstudebakers/IM001154.jpg

BobPalma
08-11-2009, 10:08 PM
quote:Originally posted by Mr.Biggs
This last pic tells a bit of the tale of why Studebaker went under. When you have to remove the welded in body brace behind the rear seat AND THEN chisle two holes in the floorboards to facilitate changing the rear shocks, well, you can see how that might affect the attitudes of owners and mechanics alike.[V]



:) Well, Bob, I'm sure you know that wasn't entirely necessary, but may have been preferred by a mechanic used to removing everything with an impact wrench. (Granted, removing the horizontal bolt securing the top of the rear shocks is no picnic...) :DBP

Roscomacaw
08-11-2009, 10:10 PM
Bob Peterson, I don't live where the daily temps struggle to get into the 60s[}:)] It was 70-something when I was out at sunrise. The front clip comes off tomorrow, between hauling the wife's teaching stuff back to her room and other considerations. Going for 101 again tomorrow. I don't hurry myself when it's like that - not that I hurry myself much at all anymore.[^]

Indeed, the floor is slated to be diced up. I figure the pillar lower ends and attaching floor pan would put a smile on the face of someone trying to revive a Midwestern rust bucket. I'm just sad I didn't make myself take time to cut the same from that '59 W6 It's floors were almost as nice.[B)]

1957 Transtar 1/2ton
1963 Cruiser
1960 Larkvertible V8
1958 Provincial wagon
1953 Commander coupe
1957 President two door

Roscomacaw
08-16-2009, 03:03 PM
Everything sheet metal is off now. I'm temped to drive it down our dead end road like this, just for funsies. I want to roll the tub off, but have to disable the brakes to do so.

http://imagehost.vendio.com/a/30906179/aview/Cruisertubonchassis.jpg

BTW, the only fasteners that offered any resistance were several door hinge screws that twisted off. Everything else spun out as if it had been installed yesterday.[^] The front fenders are obviously off a 63 Lark Standard. Two of them, in fact. They're each wearing a different color inside.

http://imagehost.vendio.com/a/30906179/aview/58_Avatar.jpg
1957 Transtar 1/2ton
1963 Cruiser
1960 Larkvertible V8
1958 Provincial wagon
1953 Commander coupe
1957 President two door

Lark Hunter
08-17-2009, 10:47 PM
Mr Biggs,
Not trying to give you unneeded grief, but why did you part this car out? It surely looked restorable, and appeared to be unusually short of rust. Seems like a lot of decent Larks meet this sad fate.:( LH

"I'm allergic to small block Chevys."

nibbs53
08-17-2009, 11:32 PM
Mr Biggs. Daily tems. for the s.f.
east bay for the rest of the week.

TUE. 69/97
WED. 66/97
THU. 66/93
FRI. 66/92

TO DAY WAS 67/96

Roscomacaw
08-18-2009, 12:00 PM
Those are nice days for us![:0]

Lark Hunter, I bought this car because the PO had put alot of money into the mechanics of it and I just thought it was too good to pass up in THAT respect. I briefly thought about trying to make it better as a Cruiser, but I already have too many keepers AND the guy I bought it from had been trying unsuccessfully to sell it for some time before I finally stepped up. (For $800 bucks)

The complete new dual exhaust system goes on my Cruiser. The engine, brakes and tires (all new) will breathe life into my 57 President eventually.[^]
I've already sold and used other bits and pieces off of it, so it's serving to support other Studes.

I WAS going to let the scrappers have everything body-wise, but just couldn't bring myself to do that in the end. SO - the stuff will sit here until (if ever) someone calls for it or I croak. Whichever comes first.

http://imagehost.vendio.com/a/30906179/aview/58_Avatar.jpg
1957 Transtar 1/2ton
1963 Cruiser
1960 Larkvertible V8
1958 Provincial wagon
1953 Commander coupe
1957 President two door

T-CAB
08-19-2009, 12:10 AM
TOO LATE:

I could have used lots of parts off of this car. As you can see mine was RUSTY!!!. Have to had fabricate new floor pans, firewall posts, trunk floor and parts of wheelhouses and rear door jam.

Try to save those areas that are good as there are lost of rusty cars in the North (in this case Manitoba, Cdn) that need donor parts.

http://i589.photobucket.com/albums/ss333/t-Cab/DoorJamRearLt.jpg

http://i589.photobucket.com/albums/ss333/t-Cab/Familyandtrk.jpg[/IMG]

studeclunker
08-19-2009, 03:15 AM
It's really too bad that the Station Wagon's rear quarter panels didn't come off like that. It would have saved many-a wagon owner grief in repairs.[B)][8] Then again, as has been said numerous times here, the maker didn't expect these cars to be soldering along forty, fifty, even sixty years later.;) Sorry to see such a little lady lose the fight.:([xx(] Still, she'll keep a lot of others on the road, I suppose.

http://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b18/Studeclunker/december%2006/HPIM0234.jpg http://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b18/Studeclunker/56%20Parkview%20Wagon/56wagonleftfrontclipped-1.jpg
Home of the famous Mr. Ed!
K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
Ron Smith
Where the heck is Lewiston, CA?

bams50
08-19-2009, 05:39 AM
I've made peace with the reality that I can't save all these very viable cars- or so I thought. But seeing that model, with solid floors, lost still stings more than I expected[V]:( This GT I just got from So Cal is routine for those from there but just a marvel to us in the NE.

Nothing I can do about it now, except try to save future cars however I can...



Robert (Bob) Andrews- on the IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys)
Parish, central NY 13131
http://www.patrioticon.org/images/flag1-1.gif

Roscomacaw
08-19-2009, 11:13 AM
Well, it's solid floors will give life to other Larks. Other parts will serve other cars as well. Further consider that they haven't stopped coming out of the woodwork yet. In fact, I learned yesterday about a 60 ragtop that's been sitting hidden for who knows HOW MANY years?[:0] I'd bet that Bob Peterson has had to turn away cars since he shut down his yard. Look at the 5 Larks that Anne just brought to light. Who'll be their savior? It's easy to proclaim they all should be saved. Taking real action's a bit more daunting of a task.;)

http://imagehost.vendio.com/a/30906179/aview/58_Avatar.jpg
1957 Transtar 1/2ton
1963 Cruiser
1960 Larkvertible V8
1958 Provincial wagon
1953 Commander coupe
1957 President two door

Dick Steinkamp
08-19-2009, 11:38 AM
quote:Originally posted by Mr.Biggs
It's easy to proclaim they all should be saved. Taking real action's a bit more daunting of a task.;)


It probably also depends on your definition of "save".

To me, "save" means to get it back on the road with all systems working properly, safe, and maybe even looking good. Then to keep it and enjoy it, or get it into someone elses hands who will.

I think there are few that actually "save" more than 1 or 2 over their lifetime, and a lot who don't actually "save" any (they buy a running/driving Stude, or just stick a non running one in their back yard and it slowly returns to nature, or they buy it and then resell it later after doing nothing and someone else scraps it).

Taking the action to part out a Stude so others can stay on the road or return to the road is MUCH better (IMHO) than just wishing somebody else would "save" it. It's hard work to tear down a car. With a Lark, you are lucky to get $1/hour for your trouble.

I've personally obtained a lot of parts from Biggs to get and keep Studes on the road. I'm thankful he does what he does.

Dick Steinkamp
Bellingham, WA

http://i706.photobucket.com/albums/ww63/dstnkmp/63%20Daytona%20done/PP026-1.jpg

BobPalma
08-19-2009, 12:39 PM
quote:Originally posted by Dick Steinkamp


quote:Originally posted by Mr.Biggs
It's easy to proclaim they all should be saved. Taking real action's a bit more daunting of a task.;)


It probably also depends on your definition of "save".

To me, "save" means to get it back on the road with all systems working properly, safe, and maybe even looking good. Then to keep it and enjoy it, or get it into someone elses hands who will.

I think there are few that actually "save" more than 1 or 2 over their lifetime, and a lot who don't actually "save" any (they buy a running/driving Stude, or just stick a non running one in their back yard and it slowly returns to nature, or they buy it and then resell it later after doing nothing and someone else scraps it).

Taking the action to part out a Stude so others can stay on the road or return to the road is MUCH better (IMHO) than just wishing somebody else would "save" it. It's hard work to tear down a car. With a Lark, you are lucky to get $1/hour for your trouble.



:) How about a third definition of save, Dick? The following scenario doesn't seem to fit in any of those listed, so maybe there's another one? I do consider myself to have saved this collector car from a certain death by exposure and salt. See if you agree.

Brownsburg IN, circa 1976: Being a "last year manufactured" convertible nut, I sought out and bought a running and driving 1968 Rambler Rebel SST convertible. Hialeah Yellow, black top and black bucket seat interior.

It was an early-production car, so it had the largest engine (343/4-bbl/duals) available early in the year, before the 390 was introduced with the mid-year AMX. The SST convertible was a factory 4-speed car, too[:p]; honestly rare in the big scheme of things, especially among AMCs.;)

It had spent its whole life in El Paso TX, so it was bone dry...well, its whole life until about six months before I bought it, when a military fellow stationed in El Paso bought it down there. He drove it back to his home in Berrien Springs MI, not far north of South Bend...smack dab in the middle of the rust belt.

To him, it was just a driver, and that's what he had done with it. Not even a carport, much less a garage, at his Berrien Springs house, either; it just sat out in the gravel driveway.

The 4-speed proved to be a little much for his wife in the snow (and ice and salt), so he placed an ad in a local paper. A friend in South Bend called here and put me on to it. I bought it immediately, brought it home, and cleaned it as thoroughly as possible all over, especially underneath.

But I never really did anything more with it. I simply kept it garaged and running/driving for about 8 years. I ultimately realized I was never going to restore it and wanted room for other things, so I put it on my trailer and took it to the National AMC Meet in Kenosha WI, maybe 1984.

It sold immediately to some folks there, an AMC family from Detroit. They were delirious about finding such a rare car in such solid shape, wearing only original (but worn) paint. Within the year, they had restored it to better than I ever would have done; it was just gorgeous. (I saw it in person a year later).

So I'm not sure where that fits in the bracketry, Dick, but I know I surely saved that car, considering the "service" it was rendering when I bought it! :DBP

Edited for spelling.

Roscomacaw
08-19-2009, 12:50 PM
Bob,

When you said what sort of car you'd saved, my mind instantly recalled a day I spent in an LA junkyard about 16-17 years ago. At the time I was still wheeling and dealing in AMC parts as well as Stude stuff.
I'm looking at a couple of '54 Stude sedans that were sitting out for picking, when the front end loader brings out a '66 Ambassador convertible![:0] 327, 4-spd, bucket seats, AM-FM - the WORKS!

As soon as they'd set it on stands, me and another fella set about taking what we wanted off of it. We got into a bit of a disagreement over WHO had claim to the 4-spd, but I won out. So I'm busy takin' parts off if it, when the next car they bring out is a 67 Rebel ragtop! Can you say "overload"?[}:)] I was a busy boy that day.[^]

http://imagehost.vendio.com/a/30906179/aview/58_Avatar.jpg
1957 Transtar 1/2ton
1963 Cruiser
1960 Larkvertible V8
1958 Provincial wagon
1953 Commander coupe
1957 President two door

BobPalma
08-19-2009, 12:55 PM
quote:Originally posted by Mr.Biggs

Bob,

When you said what sort of car you'd saved, my mind instantly recalled a day I spent in an LA junkyard about 16-17 years ago. At the time I was still wheeling and dealing in AMC parts as well as Stude stuff.
I'm looking at a couple of '54 Stude sedans that were sitting out for picking, when the front end loader brings out a '66 Ambassador convertible![:0] 327, 4-spd, bucket seats, AM-FM - the WORKS!

As soon as they'd set it on stands, me and another fella set about taking what we wanted off of it. We got into a bit of a disagreement over WHO had claim to the 4-spd, but I won out. So I'm busy takin' parts off if it, when the next car they bring out is a 67 Rebel ragtop! Can you say "overload"?[}:)] I was a busy boy that day.[^]



:) Cool beans, Bob. Overload indeed, I'd say.

Did you see the recent Amos Press Cars & Parts magazine with the bright red 1965 or 1966 (I forget which; too lazy to dig it out) Ambassador convertible screaming across the cover?

Nice report. It's within the last 3 months. :DBP

Dick Steinkamp
08-19-2009, 01:15 PM
quote:Originally posted by BobPalma


quote:Originally posted by Dick Steinkamp


quote:Originally posted by Mr.Biggs
It's easy to proclaim they all should be saved. Taking real action's a bit more daunting of a task.;)


It probably also depends on your definition of "save".

To me, "save" means to get it back on the road with all systems working properly, safe, and maybe even looking good. Then to keep it and enjoy it, or get it into someone elses hands who will.

I think there are few that actually "save" more than 1 or 2 over their lifetime, and a lot who don't actually "save" any (they buy a running/driving Stude, or just stick a non running one in their back yard and it slowly returns to nature, or they buy it and then resell it later after doing nothing and someone else scraps it).

Taking the action to part out a Stude so others can stay on the road or return to the road is MUCH better (IMHO) than just wishing somebody else would "save" it. It's hard work to tear down a car. With a Lark, you are lucky to get $1/hour for your trouble.



:) How about a third definition of save, Dick? The following scenario doesn't seem to fit in any of those listed, so maybe there's another one? I do consider myself to have saved this collector car from a certain death by exposure and salt. See if you agree.





Yep...totally agree, Bob (and good on you for doing so :)). Neat, rare car [8D]

There are probably other valid definitions as well.

Dick Steinkamp
Bellingham, WA

http://i706.photobucket.com/albums/ww63/dstnkmp/63%20Daytona%20done/PP026-1.jpg

StudeRich
08-19-2009, 02:21 PM
The PM #2 Pic clearly shows the "stretch panel" used on '53-'61 "Y" Bodies to add the 4 in. to the floor pan, to create a long wheelbase sedan! [:0]

StudeRich

bams50
08-19-2009, 02:28 PM
quote:Originally posted by Dick Steinkamp

a lot who don't actually "save" any (they buy a running/driving Stude, or just stick a non running one in their back yard and it slowly returns to nature, or they buy it and then resell it later after doing nothing and someone else scraps it).



As you know, this is mostly what I have been doing lately. The reason I do so is obvious- I get cars that are destined to be lost to the crusher NOW. I get them, preserve them as best I can, and either give it time for me to find it a home where it WILL be restored, or preserving and selling off parts as someone's need arises. If I die tomorrow and all I have ends up being scrapped at that time, I will at least tried, and the stuff will have at least lasted that long. Without that effort, they had ZERO chance. You said "With a Lark, you are lucky to get $1/hour for your trouble", which is correct, and why I can't invest time stripping, cataloging, marketing, and shipping parts.

I am not independently wealthy and work for a living- full-time job and full-time business. My dream would be to not have to make a living and have the money and time available to just dive into a car, spend whatever it needs, finish it to a T, absorb accolades, sell, and repeat. Since that is not currently my reality, I'm doing what I can, when I can, with what abilities and resources I can muster. It's dirty, ugly, and sometimes not great, but I get some jollies doing it[8D]

I understand you don't consider this "saving" anything; but it's a workable definition in my book, and for now my portion as regards the hobby. When the time comes I am able, I will certainly be pursuing those other definitions; till then, I'm convinced where I'm at has at least some value;):D

Robert (Bob) Andrews- on the IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys)
Parish, central NY 13131
http://www.patrioticon.org/images/flag1-1.gif

bams50
08-19-2009, 02:31 PM
quote:Originally posted by Mr.Biggs

Well, it's solid floors will give life to other Larks. Other parts will serve other cars as well. Further consider that they haven't stopped coming out of the woodwork yet. In fact, I learned yesterday about a 60 ragtop that's been sitting hidden for who knows HOW MANY years?[:0] I'd bet that Bob Peterson has had to turn away cars since he shut down his yard. Look at the 5 Larks that Anne just brought to light. Who'll be their savior? It's easy to proclaim they all should be saved. Taking real action's a bit more daunting of a task.;)



I agree with everything you said here, and know it's all correct. Which is why it's bothersome that, even knowing it, it still bothers me to see 'em go[:I]

Robert (Bob) Andrews- on the IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys)
Parish, central NY 13131
http://www.patrioticon.org/images/flag1-1.gif

Roscomacaw
08-19-2009, 02:36 PM
This mania wears a BIG belt, Bob. The only thing I REALLY have troube with is when someone pulls the "Buy this or I'll crush/trash/scrap it!" BS.
Fortuneatly, most of that that surfaces on this forum is from transients hoping to exploit our heartstrings.[B)]

http://imagehost.vendio.com/a/30906179/aview/58_Avatar.jpg
1957 Transtar 1/2ton
1963 Cruiser
1960 Larkvertible V8
1958 Provincial wagon
1953 Commander coupe
1957 President two door

DEEPNHOCK
08-19-2009, 02:46 PM
All noteworthy comments.
The real question to ask is 'what' brings satisfaction to the individual Stude owner.
($192 question..... Used to be $64, but inflation screwed that:()

To some it is 'the hunt' (search).
To some it is 'the kill' (the buy)
To some it is 'the captive' (the hold)
To some it is 'the Resurrection' (the build)
To some it is 'the boob job' (division 9 build)
To some it is 'the turn' (the sale)
To some it is 'the classroom' (expound to others your knowledge)

To some it is the 'fun'...
Fun playing cars and trucks with the neighborhood kids.
Maybe it's in Jeff's sandbox, or Bobby's basement, or Dick's mud hole in his back yard.
It is a basic enjoyment thing.
It just gets messed up when people grow up.
Jeff[8D]


quote:Originally posted by bams50
As you know, this is mostly what I have been doing lately. The reason I do so is obvious- I get cars that are destined to be lost to the crusher NOW. I get them, preserve them as best I can, and either give it time for me to find it a home where it WILL be restored, or preserving and selling off parts as someone's need arises. If I die tomorrow and all I have ends up being scrapped at that time, I will at least tried, and the stuff will have at least lasted that long. Without that effort, they had ZERO chance. You said "With a Lark, you are lucky to get $1/hour for your trouble", which is correct, and why I can't invest time stripping, cataloging, marketing, and shipping parts.

I am not independently wealthy and work for a living- full-time job and full-time business. My dream would be to not have to make a living and have the money and time available to just dive into a car, spend whatever it needs, finish it to a T, absorb accolades, sell, and repeat. Since that is not currently my reality, I'm doing what I can, when I can, with what abilities and resources I can muster. It's dirty, ugly, and sometimes not great, but I get some jollies doing it[8D]

I understand you don't consider this "saving" anything; but it's a workable definition in my book, and for now my portion as regards the hobby. When the time comes I am able, I will certainly be pursuing those other definitions; till then, I'm convinced where I'm at has at least some value;):D




quote:Originally posted by Dick Steinkamp

a lot who don't actually "save" any (they buy a running/driving Stude, or just stick a non running one in their back yard and it slowly returns to nature, or they buy it and then resell it later after doing nothing and someone else scraps it).

bams50
08-19-2009, 03:10 PM
quote:Originally posted by DEEPNHOCK

All noteworthy comments.
The real question to ask is 'what' brings satisfaction to the individual Stude owner.
($192 question..... Used to be $64, but inflation screwed that:()

To some it is 'the hunt' (search).
To some it is 'the kill' (the buy)
To some it is 'the captive' (the hold)
To some it is 'the Resurrection' (the build)
To some it is 'the boob job' (division 9 build)
To some it is 'the turn' (the sale)
To some it is 'the classroom' (expound to others your knowledge)

To some it is the 'fun'...
Fun playing cars and trucks with the neighborhood kids.
Maybe it's in Jeff's sandbox, or Bobby's basement, or Dick's mud hole in his back yard.
It is a basic enjoyment thing.
It just gets messed up when people grow up.
Jeff[8D]


Love that analysis. Even you come up with the occasional gem!:D:D

Robert (Bob) Andrews- on the IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys)
Parish, central NY 13131
http://www.patrioticon.org/images/flag1-1.gif

Dick Steinkamp
08-19-2009, 03:59 PM
quote:Originally posted by DEEPNHOCK


To some it is 'the hunt' (search).
To some it is 'the kill' (the buy)
To some it is 'the captive' (the hold)
To some it is 'the Resurrection' (the build)
To some it is 'the boob job' (division 9 build)
To some it is 'the turn' (the sale)
To some it is 'the classroom' (expound to others your knowledge)




So true, Jeff. "The Drive", and "The Show" might be additions to that list....They are all valid and, you are allowed to enjoy the hobby by doing just one OR more than one! [^]

BTW, my post about "save" wasn't aimed at anyone in particular. It was a (feeble) attempt to defend Biggs for parting out a car, and threw out what I feel is a valid definition for "save" since the term is used rather loosly. Palma had another good definition. There are likely others.

To completely beat a dead horse, I would not include "The Captive" as "saving" if it was allowed to rust into the ground behind the barn. Others may not include "The Boob Job" as "saving". Two different subjects...saving and how to enjoy the hobby.

Dick Steinkamp
Bellingham, WA

http://i706.photobucket.com/albums/ww63/dstnkmp/63%20Daytona%20done/PP026-1.jpg

DEEPNHOCK
08-19-2009, 06:39 PM
Good points...
I'd add those to the list...
I guess the 'captive' would describe the keeper of the finisished Stude...
How about adding 'The Slumlord' as the keeper of rusted hulks?[:0]

The 'Boob job' reference was directed more at the belly button transplant crowd.
The stockboys scorn them, but they can't take their eyes off a well done job[}:)][:p];)
Jeff[8D]


quote:Originally posted by Dick Steinkamp
So true, Jeff. "The Drive", and "The Show" might be additions to that list....They are all valid and, you are allowed to enjoy the hobby by doing just one OR more than one! [^]

BTW, my post about "save" wasn't aimed at anyone in particular. It was a (feeble) attempt to defend Biggs for parting out a car, and threw out what I feel is a valid definition for "save" since the term is used rather loosly. Palma had another good definition. There are likely others.

To completely beat a dead horse, I would not include "The Captive" as "saving" if it was allowed to rust into the ground behind the barn. Others may not include "The Boob Job" as "saving". Two different subjects...saving and how to enjoy the hobby.

bams50
08-19-2009, 09:19 PM
quote:Originally posted by DEEPNHOCK

The stockboys scorn them, but they can't take their eyes off a well done job[}:)][:p];)
Jeff[8D]


True... difference is, with a boob job, most aren't well done, just cobbled together...[|)];)

Robert (Bob) Andrews- on the IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys)
Parish, central NY 13131
http://www.patrioticon.org/images/flag1-1.gif

Roscomacaw
08-20-2009, 12:19 PM
I like to think I have a bit of an artistic eye. And while some might think that's a plus, at times it can be very frustrating. Sometimes, I just wish the creative ideas would not pester me so. But they seem to have a mind of their own.[}:)]

Driving this Cruiser hulk with it's grumbly 289 pushing it's severly lightened form, crazy ideas start to stir. Visions of Excalibur roadsters flicker for a moment, then fade. What are the chances????????

I remember having coffee with Robbie (our resident Englishman bodymaker) and talking about his days apprenticing at Aston-Martin. That tenure well behind him, Robbie enjoyed celebrity status at our shop in Georgia. Hour by hour - day by day - Robbie would slowly and surely turn sheets of aluminum into HRG roadsters, a Ferrari Testa Rosa or maybe a replacement wing for a DB5 or DB6.

I don't have the desire to learn a new craft at 65, but I would like to meld my love of Studes with some of the fond memories of vintage European roadsters. After all, some of the most revered products of England and France embraced American V8s after WWII.

I kinda envision something with a boat tail or a pair of spare wheels at the rear. Cycle fenders out front - maybe at the rear as well. Maybe I could find a derelict VW-Bugatti body to base it on - maybe such a body isn't wide enough to sit on the Lark frame rails. I just happen to have about 8 4X8 sheets of aluminum I bought from a guy's estate some years ago. Wonder if I could contrive the better part of an attractive body without any compound curves??? Ah well, it's fun to dream.

Matthew, you still wanna swap trannies???[:p] I'd have to at least have a 4-speed.

http://imagehost.vendio.com/a/30906179/aview/58_Avatar.jpg
1957 Transtar 1/2ton
1963 Cruiser
1960 Larkvertible V8
1958 Provincial wagon
1953 Commander coupe
1957 President two door

Steve T
08-20-2009, 01:48 PM
Biggs--

Hmmm! How about this: go pre-WWI, before the days of compound curves, and build something visually similar to, say, the 1911 Marmon Wasp that won the first Indy 500...or one of the early Benz or Fiat two-seater GP cars. Add a period Stude-related grille design ("1909 Garford Speed Special", maybe?) and away you go!

S.

bams50
08-20-2009, 01:51 PM
Bob, not trying to get you in trouble, but Harbor Freight sells a decent English Wheel pretty cheap- it's not that hard to use if you supply practice and patience...:D

Robert (Bob) Andrews- on the IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys)
Parish, central NY 13131
http://www.patrioticon.org/images/flag1-1.gif

Steve T
08-20-2009, 02:15 PM
I quickly sketched a profile view of this neo-Brass Era GP car, and I gotta say it would look cool in real life. The version I drew had the driver's seat in about the original location; if you were to move the seating back to the rear-seat Cruiser position it'd look even better. You know the look; long slabsided hood, flat-topped cycle fenders, only aft bodywork is the carriage-like back on the pair of seats and the slanted panel on which sit the gas tank (flat-ended oval one a la Bugatti Brescia in my sketch) and two or three spare wheels...cool!! I added the race number "61" on the hood as a nod to the model year of the original chassis. I'll try to do a better sketch, photograph and post it soon...

S.

Roscomacaw
08-20-2009, 04:06 PM
I wanna see it,Steve![:p]

http://imagehost.vendio.com/a/30906179/aview/58_Avatar.jpg
1957 Transtar 1/2ton
1963 Cruiser
1960 Larkvertible V8
1958 Provincial wagon
1953 Commander coupe
1957 President two door

Steve T
08-21-2009, 03:46 PM
Biggs--

You've mentioned Bugattis in this context a time or two here. And the avoidance of compound-curve sheet metal work.

Something's hit me a ton:

Go onto Google Images for "Bugatti T32 Tank". OK, the Cruiser floor and frame are longer and wider...but there ain't no compound curves on this baby!! What a conversation piece it'd be: "1923 Bugatti-Studebaker Indy Special", perchance...:D

(I am still going to sketch up that 1910 Vanderbilt Cup-esque Stude racer phantom, too. Have been eyeballing pix of American racers of that period and some of them look very promising Cruiser-wise...)

S.

Steve T
09-05-2009, 03:48 PM
OK, here it is as threatened:D...based on the dimensions from a photo of a '61 Cruiser, with the two-and-only seats at the rear-seat location, here's a sketch of the 1912 Studebaker Biggs Speed Special...
http://s290.photobucket.com/albums/ll260/StudeSteve/Studebaker%20Miscellany/K4BD4AA2956F_1000329-1.jpg

S.

Tom B
09-05-2009, 06:34 PM
StudeBob, Go for it. The only jarring note is the (are the) six inch wide wheels/tires. You could even mount the E-Brake outside left.

[img=left]http://www.alink.com/personal/tbredehoft/Avatar1.jpg[/img=left]
Tom Bredehoft
'53 Commander Coupe (since 1959)
'55 President (6H Y6) State Sedan
....On the road, again....
'05 Legacy Ltd Wagon
All Indiana built cars