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jclary
07-30-2009, 09:58 AM
http://i518.photobucket.com/albums/u346/jconln/Studebaker%20Horse%20drawn%20wagons/July282009006.jpg


This past Tuesday, Domenic Manera (Studehunter on the forum) of York, South Carolina and I paid a visit to a municipal storage facility in his town. Being the Fire Chief, Domenic had discovered a suspected Studebaker wagon stored in a basement room during a fire inspection. I volunteered as an "expert" (meaning that I had seen a few Studebaker horse drawn vehicles) to accompany him for a closer look. In the spirit of "Life is like a box of chocolates..."we not only discovered "A" Studebaker wagon, but "Three!" One is clearly in better shape and the ghostly remains of the original factor paint scheme and Studebaker logo whispers through the faded patina of time. In the dark, dusty, and on this day...HOT, basement room, is a collection of artifacts intended for some future local museum. An old flat belt pulley driven cotton gin, and other horse drawn buggy, carriage, and postal delivery wagon of unknown origin. The Studebakers are farm wagons with some type of hinged rear door that looks as though it could have been used to allow grain or seed to be metered out for filling sacks or some other purpose that I am not familiar with. We did find some casting numbers on some of the hardware, but no specific "Studebaker" logo or tag. However, the paint scheme, the shaped spokes and hardware configurations were very similar to what I have seen on other Studebaker wagons. These wagons were apparently very much used but well maintained. The wheels had pieces of leather lapped over the top of the axle inside the wheels for dust protection and grease soaked hemp rope wound on the inside hub to act as a dust seal and lubrication aid. If anyone reading this could provide me of a source of "Wagon component nomenclature" I would appreciate it. I don't want to refer to parts as "that thingy", but would rather have the correct terms. I will attempt to link to the "photobucket" pictures I took. Forgive me for the lack of focus on some, but the excitement of the experience, lighting, and lack of skill are the main factors in the poor pictures.:):):)

http://s518.photobucket.com/albums/u346/jconln/Studebaker%20Horse%20drawn%20wagons/

John Clary
Greer, SC
http://i518.photobucket.com/albums/u346/jconln/HPIM0372-2.jpg
Life... is what happens as you are making plans.
SDC member since 1975

Chris Pile
07-30-2009, 10:26 AM
Interesting search, I'll wager.

Chris Pile
Editor: The Studebaker Special
http://midwaystudebakers.tripod.com/

Roscomacaw
07-30-2009, 11:03 AM
Pretty cool (er, hot) find!:D

1957 Transtar 1/2ton
1963 Cruiser
1960 Larkvertible V8
1958 Provincial wagon
1953 Commander coupe
1957 President two door

BobPalma
07-30-2009, 11:07 AM
:) Cool beans, John.

Gary Hearn hasn't been on the forum for some time (unfortunately, I might add!), and knows quite a bit about these. Why not e-mail him through the forum and inquire?

Perhaps it will pique his interest to return and we'll all benefit. :DBP

BobGlasscock
07-30-2009, 11:17 AM
John, I agree with your assessment of the hinged tailgate for measured dispensing. I don't know about filling bags, but that system would accomplish leaving a trail of grain (or feed) on the ground for livestock to eat. A process still used for open range stock feeding.

What a beautiful find!

'50 Champion, 1 family owner
http://i251.photobucket.com/albums/gg316/studebakerbob/SDC%20avatar/Studebakerstuff019.jpghttp://i251.photobucket.com/albums/gg316/studebakerbob/SDC%20avatar/Studebakerstuff018.jpg

jclary
07-30-2009, 11:55 AM
quote:Originally posted by BobGlasscock

John, I agree with your assessment of the hinged tailgate for measured dispensing. I don't know about filling bags, but that system would accomplish leaving a trail of grain (or feed) on the ground for livestock to eat. A process still used for open range stock feeding.

What a beautiful find!

'50 Champion, 1 family owner
http://i251.photobucket.com/albums/gg316/studebakerbob/SDC%20avatar/Studebakerstuff019.jpghttp://i251.photobucket.com/albums/gg316/studebakerbob/SDC%20avatar/Studebakerstuff018.jpg



Giving this further thought...I wonder if the wagons and the old belt driven cotton gin could be related. The wagons would have been essential for such a commercial operation as a gin mill. These wagons appear to have been very used but cared for as you would expect in a commercial enterprise. The cotton seed was as valued as the cotton fiber. It was used for future crops, oil extraction, and various other purposes. I could see the wagons being used to collect the seed as the gin separated them from the fiber. AS various farmers in the region brought their crop to the gin...multiple wagons would have been required to handle the seed to keep things moving along. Just a thought...as a teenager...I picked and hauled cotton from the fields to collection points, but never went to the gin mill. Of course, that was in the late 1950's and early 60's so the days of steam or water wheel driven gins was long past.:):):)

John Clary
Greer, SC
http://i518.photobucket.com/albums/u346/jconln/HPIM0372-2.jpg
Life... is what happens as you are making plans.
SDC member since 1975

Avantidon
07-30-2009, 12:51 PM
Bob, Gary has not abandoned us but is extremely trying to get himself reemployed as a driect result of the sale of his former employer earlier this year. Hopefully he is very close to resolving that soon

BobPalma
07-30-2009, 01:27 PM
quote:Originally posted by Avantidon

Bob, Gary has not abandoned us but is extremely trying to get himself reemployed as a driect result of the sale of his former employer earlier this year. Hopefully he is very close to resolving that soon.


:) Oh, I know that, Don. I hear reports about Gary from time to time through Leonard Shepherd.

I just miss him on the Forum and hope he's able to get back real soon. Employment issues can be a bummer, and I'd hope Gary would enjoy the amusement here as a breather, as well as provide valuable input on topics such as this one. :DBP

jclary
07-30-2009, 10:15 PM
While attempting to research some more information on these wagons, I ran across this blurb from an 1877 Studebaker sales ad...
"It is the only wagon in which the SLOPE-SHOULDER SPOKE is used. hence they have the best wheel, which is actually the foundation of the wagon, and should be carefully examined by persons purchasing."

So...if your Studebaker develops a bit of a "Slope-Shoulder" do you suppose it is honoring its heritage?:)

John Clary
Greer, SC
http://i518.photobucket.com/albums/u346/jconln/HPIM0372-2.jpg
Life... is what happens as you are making plans.
SDC member since 1975