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N8N
01-02-2007, 08:16 AM
Front drum should look very familiar if you've ever worked on any car with tapered roller bearings. No special instructions. Be aware that the inner bearings and grease seals changed in 1956 or so so if you end up buying new parts best to check your hubs before buying as the spindles are all the same, so you can put newer parts on an older car and vice versa.

nate

--
55 Commander Starlight
http://home.comcast.net/~njnagel

valleyguy
01-02-2007, 09:03 AM
I plan to replace the brake shoes, hoses and wheel cylinders on
my 58 Hawk...I know that the rear brake drum removal on my Hawk requires a special puller; my questions is does the front drum removal require any special procedure/tools as well? the shop manual doesn't address it. tks,

CHAMP
01-02-2007, 09:13 AM
No. Nothing unusual about the front drum removal. Don't forget to loosen the brake adjusters before removing the drums.

GARY H 2DR.SEDAN 48 STUDEBAKER CHAMPION NORTHEAST MD.

valleyguy
01-02-2007, 04:32 PM
ok, front left drum came off easily once I backed off the adjusters, as you suggested. I started there because that was the wheel that was pulling slightly when I apply the brakes; Everything looks "ok", no sign of brake fluid leaking, shoes look like they still have lots of material left, etc. Since I have no idea of the age of any of these components,(5 years, 10 years, 40 years???) I would like to get an opinion from those of you that have "been there done that:,,, would it be advisable to go ahead and replace all the parts now, including bearings, wheel cylinder, while I have it apart, since they are "relatively" inexpensive?? Any input would be appreciated. Tks,

kmul221
01-02-2007, 04:43 PM
My long departed father used to say"If it aint broke ,don't fix it"
Unless there is obvious safty concernes it's best to "Leave well enough alone"

CHAMP
01-02-2007, 05:23 PM
You can pull back the rubber covers on the wheel cyl. and if they are dry and not rusty the wheel cyl. should be ok. If the rubber brake hoses don't look new I would replace all of them including the rear one. A bad hose can cause a brake to pull.

GARY H 2DR.SEDAN 48 STUDEBAKER CHAMPION NORTHEAST MD.

N8N
01-02-2007, 05:47 PM
I'd personally change the grease seals and clean and repack the wheel bearings in addition to the other advice offered in this thread. I wouldn't start replacing stuff that doesn't look bad however.

good luck

nate

--
55 Commander Starlight
http://home.comcast.net/~njnagel

John Kirchhoff
01-02-2007, 06:59 PM
You say you started on the left side because that is the direction the car pulled when braking. Actually it may be the right side with the problem and the car pulls left because the right one isn't working as hard as the left. One thing I'm a firm believer in is cleaning up the brake cylinders. Brake fluid absorbs moisture and that moisture has a tendency to settle out when the fluid can't keep any more water in suspension. You then have a blob of water setting at the low point of the cylinder where it rusts the metal. The rubber cups are still available at auto parts stores and really quite reasonable, especially when you consider what the skin on your backside is worth. It's a pain to have to bleed the system afterwards, but that way you're assured of evacuating most or nearly all the old cruddy fluid. If the fluid in the master cylinder is dark and rusty looking, it has no business being in your brake system.

If you're going to replace the brake cylinder cups, it's a good time to replace the brake hoses if needed. If the rubber is dry and cracked and you can see fabric underneath, it's probably wise to change them. Often times the hose cracks where the hose meets the metal end. I special ordered two front hoses this summer at NAPA for $27 total I think. A rear hose wasn't available, but I had a new hose in the shop that I believe was for the rear of a '77 Dodge pickup. It was slightly longer and I had to bend the rear brake lines a bit, but otherwise it fit and works fine. Inspect the steel brake lines, particularly any place a bracket holds it against the frame. Open and exposed they seem to last forever but any place moisture or dirt can collect is a place for rust to form. Again, brake lines are pretty cheap. I replaced probably half of the lines (excluding those on the rear axle) on my Hawk and I think I spend $13 or so. They weren't rusted through or leaking, but just the peace of mind is worth that I figure.

I know brake work is dirty and unglamorous, but for $100 you can have just about everything brand spanking new excluding shoes. The brakes will be safe and dependable and as far as the hundred bucks goes, even a tiny fender bender will cost many times that to fix.

valleyguy
01-03-2007, 09:17 AM
Appeciate all the good advice; the metal brake line on this left side of my car really looks pitted and rusty; so I'll plan on replacing that as well as the seals and rubber line; However, I don't see them advertised anywhere with the Stude vendors; In this stuff available from local auto stores? does anyone know what size line it is? tks

John Kirchhoff
01-03-2007, 10:26 AM
You other folks out there may have to correct me, but for the steel line I think you need 1/8" diameter line with 3/16" diameter SAE fittings. Make sure the kid behind the counter doesn't give you metric fittings, they're close but not close enough. Auto parts stores sell the barke line in various lengths such as 12", 18", 2,3,4 feet and so on. If you only need a portion of a very long line replaced, you can get compression fittings to couple the old and new lines after they've been cut off. They are kind of expensive ($4?) and sometimes the cost of the coupler will buy a piece the entire length needed or two lines with a union connector to connect the two threaded fittings. The compression fittings aren't an ordinary brass gas line fitting, but a steel one that needs to be tightened down very tight. In addition, the old line needs to have any rust cleaned off so the little easily dropped pieces can be slipped on.

The metal line is soft and easy to bend into the shape you need. If you don't have a hand held tubing bender, you can take a large socket like 1" or a large piece of pipe and bend the tubing around that to achieve a nice even curve and to prevent kinks. If you don't take the old line off first, you can use a little flexible tape measure to follow the contours of the line to get an accurate length. You can even use a piece of string if necessary. If you can't get a line short enough, like the 6" line from the master cylinder to hill holder, use a longer line and simply wrap the tubing around the socket or piece of pipe like a coil spring to use up the extra length.

Around here Auto Zone, O'Rileys and NAPA all carry or can get replacement cups for the brake cylinders at something like $6 apiece I believe. As far as the rubber brake lines go, a little extra length in the back isn't that big of a deal but on the front you need one of the correct length. Too short and you can tear it and too long and you can kink it when turning or on bumps. As I said earlier, NAPA got my American made front ones overnight at a price comparable to any other line.

valleyguy
01-06-2007, 08:52 AM
OK, I got all the parts needed so I'll tackle this project soon;
BTW, I checked on new brake shoes as well just for the heck of
it and NAPA said they had them, pretty cheap too. However, the number I gave them (listed in the cross-reference guide on this site,
R176) are in fact "10" shoes and also
a little more narrow than the original. The "11"'s have been discontinued apparently. I assume the new ones sold by SI are
correct but they are pricey... tks for all your help.