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gordr
06-25-2009, 10:12 AM
First, the black Avanti I bought from Bob Peterson:

http://i210.photobucket.com/albums/bb222/gordintrochu/63Avanti/Avanti01.jpg

http://i210.photobucket.com/albums/bb222/gordintrochu/63Avanti/Avanti02.jpg

http://i210.photobucket.com/albums/bb222/gordintrochu/63Avanti/Avanti03.jpg

Still sporting a coat of dust it picked up when I drove through a construction zone in Kickinghorse Pass on the Trans-Canada Highway.

Second, here is Pogo, new addition to the household:

http://i210.photobucket.com/albums/bb222/gordintrochu/Pogo2.jpg

Pogo came home with me just last night, and she's still kind of lonely for her mama and her littermates. She's 10 weeks old, and her mama is a Basset hound, and papa is a border collie cross. Pogo looks a lot like a Beagle, but I think she may grow a little bigger than your typical Beagle.

Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

Michidan
06-25-2009, 10:28 AM
The new dog is very cute.
The old dog needs a bath and has cataracts. :)

http://i59.photobucket.com/albums/g293/loraxdan66/signature3.jpg
www.studebakerhardtop.com

JBOYLE
06-25-2009, 10:34 AM
A Basset-Border Collie-mix mix should be interesting.

I've had Bassets for almost 20 years...very mellow.
Quite a difference from the reputation of Border Collies: high energy, always on the go.
Should be a fun dog.

Nice car. What options are on it?

63 Avanti R1 2788
1914 Stutz Bearcat
(George Barris replica)

Washington State

gordr
06-25-2009, 10:45 AM
Options? AM radio, and heater. Or was the heater standard equipment? It was an R2 car with Powershift. Powershift is still there, but the R2 has been replaced by a 259. I think, if the engine proves to be as sound as it appears, that I will hang a Paxton on it.

No power steering, no power windows. Pretty plain-Jane Avanti.

Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

2R5
06-25-2009, 11:28 AM
A hound that will round up the cows ! ;)

[IMG]http://i99.photobucket.com/albums/l300/2R5/smallchamp-1.jpghttp://i99.photobucket.com/albums/l300/2R5/2008Daytona.jpg
Home of the Fried Green Tomato
"IF YOU WANT THE SMILES YOU NEED TO DO THE MILES "

1960 Champ
1964 Daytona HT

Anne F. Goodman
06-25-2009, 11:45 AM
I love your new friend Pogo. Bassets are my dog of choice not purebreds though. I just love the Bassadors. I have had Basset and Llasa Alpso and Basset & Pit Bull too. Great loyal Dogs.

Mabel 1949 Champion
Hawk 1957 Silverhawk
Gus 1958 Transtar
The Prez 1955 President State
Blu 1957 Golden Hawk
Daisy 1954 Commander Regal Coupe
Fresno,Ca
http://i122.photobucket.com/albums/o269/nw3anne/Mabel.jpg?t=1165475035http://i122.photobucket.com/albums/o269/nw3anne/xmasannecopy.jpghttp://i122.photobucket.com/albums/o269/nw3anne/GusMater.jpghttp://s122.photobucket.com/albums/o269/nw3anne/th_DSCN17232008-01-01.jpghttp://i122.photobucket.com/albums/o269/nw3anne/54%20Commander%20Regal%20Coupe/3539580552_f5500eb0d8-1-1.jpg

tutone63
06-25-2009, 12:12 PM
Thats a cute dog! I myself am a dog lover. I have learned from experiece, however, that dog hair is VERY hard to vaccum out of a Studebaker's carpet and upholstry! (but give it a ride every once in awhile anyway...they love it!

http://i253.photobucket.com/albums/hh54/tutone63/63larkside-1.jpghttp://www.thelincolnforum.net/phpbb3/images/smilies/035.gif


1963 Lark, 259 V8, two-tone paint, Twin Traction. Driven often, always noticed!

Mark57
06-25-2009, 12:39 PM
Lots of room for Pogo to run AND, lots of Studes for him to keep corralled. ;):)

<h5>Mark
'57 Transtar Deluxe
Vancouver Island Chapter
http://sdcvi.shawwebspace.ca/ </h5>

http://i186.photobucket.com/albums/x153/MarkH57/CandyStore1Thumb.jpg

candbstudebakers
06-25-2009, 01:04 PM
Gordr, from the looks of your place your are a few miles out , but I will bet you get your TW before I do, you should have come down sooner and taken home a few more of the last cheap ones before I closed the yard...Bob

Bob Peterson / C & B Studebakers

Castro Valley, CA

http://i691.photobucket.com/albums/vv271/canbstudebakers/IM000994-1-1.jpg

BobGlasscock
06-25-2009, 05:18 PM
Gord, how come that old bus is parked way back in the corner? I thought you were working hard on that thing a few months back. It ought to be a ppl-hauler by now, huh?

'50 Champion, 1 family owner
http://i251.photobucket.com/albums/gg316/studebakerbob/SDC%20avatar/Studebakerstuff019.jpghttp://i251.photobucket.com/albums/gg316/studebakerbob/SDC%20avatar/Studebakerstuff018.jpg

fargoguy
06-25-2009, 06:22 PM
quote:Originally posted by BobGlasscock

Gord, how come that old bus is parked way back in the corner? I thought you were working hard on that thing a few months back. It ought to be a ppl-hauler by now, huh?

'50 Champion, 1 family owner
http://i251.photobucket.com/albums/gg316/studebakerbob/SDC%20avatar/Studebakerstuff019.jpghttp://i251.photobucket.com/albums/gg316/studebakerbob/SDC%20avatar/Studebakerstuff018.jpg




Bob- What you're seeing there is the " Parts " Bus- the other one is up close to the garage. You have to visit Gord's to truly understand the scope of his collection! Evan

Evan Davis
Prairie Bulletin
Saskatchewan Chapter
Prince Albert, Sk
http://www.saskstudebaker.ca/Studebaker.html

BobGlasscock
06-25-2009, 07:26 PM
whew! I feel better. Now I can sleep tonight.

'50 Champion, 1 family owner
http://i251.photobucket.com/albums/gg316/studebakerbob/SDC%20avatar/Studebakerstuff019.jpghttp://i251.photobucket.com/albums/gg316/studebakerbob/SDC%20avatar/Studebakerstuff018.jpg

sals54
06-25-2009, 07:31 PM
Good looking collection, but don't forget to spray weedkiller under those cars. The acids in the grass will eat those cars in no time.

sals54
http://i296.photobucket.com/albums/mm197/sals54/NewSignature.jpg

gordr
06-27-2009, 11:10 PM
Update for June 27:

I decided to tear into the passenger door today, and fix the window regulator. Stuff like that has to be done for me to get an out-of-province inspection anyway. Took the interior door panel off; it was mostly held on by the door and window cranks, and badly warped to boot.

The window was off the regulator pins, and both nylon rollers were busted. I took all the guts out of the door, and blasted the crud out of it with compressed air and a vacuum cleaner. I lubed up the regulator, and reinstalled that. Discovered that the pinch channel in which the glass sits was all but totally rusted away. I think the glass remained in there mainly by force of habit. I pried the rusty channel off the glass (didn't take much effort), and then hacksawed the rusty channel between the spot welds that held it to the roller track support, and twisted each piece off individually. That went very easily. I robbed the pinch channel off a 2-door Lark window, and welded that to the roller track support. The replacement was only 25" long compared to the original's 29", so I cut it in the middle, and left a 4" gap, but the glass is well-supported at both ends. Bumped it back on the glass with a rubber mallet, and it fit nice and secure.

Got the window back on the regulator, with some rollers robbed off a Lark window regulator. Lubed up the vent window pivot, and set the tension on it, then reinstalled the vent window assembly, which of course is also the front track for the main glass. Then I installed the rear guide track. Window cranks up and down real slick, now, but I noticed the inner door skin was starting to crack around the area where the fixed pivot mounts (just aft of the interior door handle). There was evidence of an old repair there, mainly a thick glob of hardened resin. I ground that area out with my Dremel tool, then made up a Z-shaped piece of steel strip, with a hole drilled so it could be held under the front screw of the pivot base. This bridged the crack, and I then used a pop rivet to secure the other end of the strip to sound fiberglass beyond the crack. Then I mixed up a glob of fiberglass-reinforced filler compound, and slathered that over the area I'd ground, and more or less embedded the steel "splint" within it. That has eliminated motion on the crack, which before was noticeable when cranking the glass to the very top. Now all that happens is that the top of the large rectangular opening bellies inward about a quarter inch when the window is cranked up. I plan to do something about that before buttoning it up; probably another steel splint. I remember having to do much the same with my previous Avanti. I'd say the weakness in that area is a design flaw.

Next, I tore the interior door panel apart, because it was so badly warped that it could not be properly fitted to the door. Got the stainless trim, the arm rest, and the fabric all separated from the Grade A, No. 1 cardboard making up the panels. I have several half-sheets of nice thin mahogany-faced plywood that are dead flat, even after being stored for years in the barn, so I'm going to use that. I've taken the cardboard, and soaked it down with the garden hose, and will repeat until it softens a bit, and then press them flat with an iron. Then I ought to be able to accurately transfer the outlines and hole locations of the original panels to the plywood, which is no more than .020 thicker than the original cardboard.

Since I had torn the fabric slightly at the top front of the interior door panel while stripping it from the cardboard, I figured I would take down the already-sagging headliner, and use some of that material for a patch. So I got to work stripping that. The "roll bar cover" in this car car was just a strip of cardboard covered with foam-backed fabric, and attached to the roll bar with drywall screws (!) and finishing washers. Took that down, and the side bolsters for the headliner, which appear to be the original cardboard, similarly covered. Found several mud-dauber nests while doing this, thankfully unoccupied. I fou

Dick Steinkamp
06-27-2009, 11:18 PM
quote:Originally posted by gordr

Update for June 27:

I decided to tear into the passenger door today...


I need a nap after just READING that! [:0] [|)]

Dick Steinkamp
Bellingham, WA

http://i706.photobucket.com/albums/ww63/dstnkmp/pics075-1-1.jpg

barnlark
06-27-2009, 11:27 PM
I'll say a good day's work! Can't wait for updated pictures, Gord. I chainsawed trees all day. I'm hosting my first local SDC meet tomorrow and spent the evening gathering enough necessities to feed and hydrate the hungry & thirsty members of the Ohio Region. Wish you lived closer, Gord. You'd be great for inspiration to the crowd with that new project Avanti. [^]

Anne F. Goodman
06-27-2009, 11:46 PM
Wow Gord you really Get R Done.


Mabel 1949 Champion
Hawk 1957 Silverhawk
Gus 1958 Transtar
The Prez 1955 President State
Blu 1957 Golden Hawk
Daisy 1954 Commander Regal Coupe
Fresno,Ca
http://i122.photobucket.com/albums/o269/nw3anne/Mabel.jpg?t=1165475035http://i122.photobucket.com/albums/o269/nw3anne/xmasannecopy.jpghttp://i122.photobucket.com/albums/o269/nw3anne/GusMater.jpghttp://s122.photobucket.com/albums/o269/nw3anne/th_DSCN17232008-01-01.jpghttp://i122.photobucket.com/albums/o269/nw3anne/54%20Commander%20Regal%20Coupe/3539580552_f5500eb0d8-1-1.jpg

gordr
06-28-2009, 01:14 AM
I will get my camera out tomorrow, and take some pictures. I spent close to 7 hours today working on it. Still have to go out and hose down the warped cardboard again.

Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

GTtim
06-28-2009, 07:43 AM
Gord, you are truly amazing. Not only do you do the full days work, but write it up and take the pictures for all of us. Thanks.
I can't help but notice that you can see a long ways in any direction from your house. Quite the landscape!
Oh, and by the way, I have found that Studebakers look better with dog hair stuck in the carpet, I wouldn't mine to be without.

Tim K.
'64 R2 GT Hawk

Skip Lackie
06-28-2009, 12:54 PM
Gord-
While you're at it, finish doing that laundry!

Skip Lackie
Washington DC

Dick Clemens
06-28-2009, 03:10 PM
ANNE: With all the alien Rednecks from Arkansas and Oklahoma up thar in middle California, you should know how to say GIT-ER-DONE.lol

studedick from the lower Ozarks

Anne F. Goodman
06-28-2009, 03:40 PM
yeah but my internal speller has a conflict
http://i122.photobucket.com/albums/o269/nw3anne/Hat090.jpg

Mabel 1949 Champion
Hawk 1957 Silverhawk
Gus 1958 Transtar
The Prez 1955 President State
Blu 1957 Golden Hawk
Daisy 1954 Commander Regal Coupe
Fresno,Ca
http://i122.photobucket.com/albums/o269/nw3anne/Mabel.jpg?t=1165475035http://i122.photobucket.com/albums/o269/nw3anne/xmasannecopy.jpghttp://i122.photobucket.com/albums/o269/nw3anne/GusMater.jpghttp://s122.photobucket.com/albums/o269/nw3anne/th_DSCN17232008-01-01.jpghttp://i122.photobucket.com/albums/o269/nw3anne/54%20Commander%20Regal%20Coupe/3539580552_f5500eb0d8-1-1.jpg

gordr
06-28-2009, 03:53 PM
Back at it today. Just taking a lunch break while some fiberglass filler sets. Got the driver's door apart. That was quite a struggle, with rusted bolts to contend with, and a regulator whose pinion had run right off the end of the sector gear. It had some old repair work, dating back to 1969. How do I know? The perpetrator wrote the date in resin on the inside of the outer door skin.

Avanti hinge disease had set in on the upper hinge mounting point. This is where the resin in the fiberglass crumbles into powder at the stress concentration created by the steel hinge leaf bolted to a fiberglass door. I took photos, and will put them up this evening. I'm in the process of making that repair, with the door off, and on a work stand. Avanti doors are LIGHT without the glass in them.

This window will need the pinch channel changed, too. If this car was a California car all its life, it must have been coastal. Such rust as there is appears to due to damp air, I think. No harm, no foul; I wasn't expecting a perfect car, anyway. I still think it's fundamentally more sound than my previous one.

Back to the grille!

Update: I'm pretty well finished with the cure for this case of Avanti hinge disease, and I've posted photos of the process here:http://s210.photobucket.com/albums/bb222/gordintrochu/63Avanti/

The upper hinge attachment point had been repaired previously, with a dollop of resin and fiberglass cloth, but the repair had failed. There's a pretty fierce twisting moment applied to that mounting point, especially of the door is opened too fast or is caught by wind, and fetches up hard against the door check. My previous Avanti had the same thing happen to it, and I made a repair which was still good when I sold the car.

If I had been on the Avanti design team, i would have insisted on forming the inner door skin with a set of molded-in 3/4 by 3/4 inch channels on the door interior side, and then had a light jig-welded frame of similar-size steel tubing set into those grooves, and riveted at numerous places. Metal plates welded to this tubing skeleton would fit between the back side of the hinge attachment points and the nut plates. This would distribute the load imposed by the hinges throughout the entire structure of the door, with a very small penalty for weight. (Actually, there might be no penalty at all, because the door structure could be made lighter, taking advantage of the strength of the steel.) But I digress.

I first cut away a section of the inner door skin over the damaged area. The hinges mount to a thick piece of molded fiberglass that is bonded to both the inner face and the inner edges of the inner door skin. It is this piece that has cracked out around the hinge; not completely, but the integrity is gone, and you can readily see movement on the crack when lifting the door or swinging it against its stop.

Exposing the damaged area revealed an old repair. Looks like somebody painted the damaged area with resin, and tucked pieces of fiberglass cloth through the bolt access holes in the inner skin, and stuck them down. Probably worked for a while, but it was mostly unbonded when I found it. Kind of hard to prep the surface, working through those access holes. I peeled off the old cloth, and then used a Dremel tool and air die grinder to grind off the old resin and rough up the surface of the original inner structure. I also ground out the cracks as much as I thought wise. I carried the grinding up around the mounting hole for the bottom bolt of the vent window frame, too.

Next, I mixed up some of the green Bondo-glass filler, and applied a thin even coat to the ground-off areas, and really slathered it on where I'd ground out the cracks. Once that had set up, I used a Vixen file to shave it down until the high spots in the original inner structure just appeared. Then I pre-cut some strips of fiberglass mat, one basically the width of the repair area, and a little longer, the other about 1" by 3", to run from the repair area up and around the lower vent window mount hole. Mix

8E45E
06-29-2009, 06:53 AM
quote:Originally posted by gordr

Any guesses as to what this would cost if you gave the job to a body shop?


Factor in your cost of materials plus $105.00 an hour shop charge. That is the last figure I got from Pat.

Craig

JRoberts
06-29-2009, 03:19 PM
Dick took the words right off of my keyboard. Just reading all you've done here Gary makes me tired. My hat's off to you.

Joe Roberts
'61 R1 Champ
'65 Cruiser
Editor of "The Down Easterner"
Eastern North Carolina Chapter

gordr
06-30-2009, 11:52 PM
The saga continues. I got the door back on the car today. First fit had the top front corner sitting nearly 1/2" too far out from the body. I got the torch out, and heated the hinge leaf to bend it, after soaking a scrap of blue jean material in water, and laying a doubled layer of it over the fender to protect it.

First go-round with the torch didn't produce enough bend; the second go-round did. No heat damage to the car's body. As of now, the door closes and latches well, and the "floptivity" around the upper hinge is gone. But the entire front edge of the door sits a little too far IN relative to the plane of the front fender, and the rear of the door sits a little too far OUT relative to the rear fender. Next work session will see me remove the door again, make up a set of shims to fit between the hinges and the door, and then play around with door fit again. The passenger door fits "almost" perfectly in its opening, and I would like the driver's door to be equally good.

This stuff is a PITA to do, but it sure shows when it isn't done right.

I also got the cardboard panels from the passenger door interior panel sufficiently soaked down with water that they softened up a bit, and then I pressed them flat with a clothes iron. It really did work. I won't claim them to be as flat as new stock, but they are now flat enough that I can use them as patterns to cut new panels from the light plywood stock I have on hand.

I'm thinking about what colors to use in refurbing the interior. Any suggestions from gallery here, bearing in mind that I'm not hung up on authenticity? I was thinking of going with black or charcoal for the headliner, and maybe black vinyl with gold vinyl highlights for the seats and interior door panels. Seeing as the interior door panels are both off ( and one is stripped apart), it makes sense to me to have the upholsterer do those panels first, and I can install them, and get a feel for how the car will look totally done in that style.

Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

gordr
07-04-2009, 12:46 AM
Update, July 3:

Got shims made for the hinges. I cut four blanks from a sheet of satin-coat sheet metal stock, clamped them, and Mig-welded them at two opposite corners. Then I center-punched the holes for the screw clearance, and drilled the holes through all four at once in the drill press. Sure beats doing them one by one.

I installed one shim on each hinge, upper and lower. Then I closed the door, and pried it back and up with a scraper, which had a broad enough surface that it didn't dimple the paint or fiberglass. Decided I needed to remove one of the two shims behind the lock striker. I took the striker off, and golly, it was crusty with rust! So I wrapped the chrome portion with masking tape, and gave the steel base a zap with the sandblaster, and then a shot with aluminum-tone rust paint. Looks 100% better, too.

With one shim out of the latch striker, the door centered pretty well in the opening, so I crawled through from the other side, and tightened the hinge bolts to lock the door in that position. With the hinge bolts all tightened, the door fits pretty well. The front edge is about dead-on with the rear edge of the front fender, and the gap around the perimeter of the door is nearly even all the way around. The top rear of the door is pretty even with the rear quarter, but the bottom rear is still out nearly a quarter-inch. If I shimmed the top hinge more, that would likely pull the rear bottom in, but at the expense of making the fit at the top front bad. My best guess is that the entire door is slightly warped. I'm simply going to leave it for now. To make it better would require actual "bodywork" as opposed to simple structural repairs.

I also got the window regulator mechanism fixed up and installed, robbing the pinch channel off another used lark window as I did on the right side. The window cranks up/down quite easily, and when up, fits the opening quite well. The door closes easily and solidly, without me having to slam it, and it no longer flops on the hinges. Almost like a new car, it is.

Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

Anne F. Goodman
07-04-2009, 09:05 AM
Great job which Studebaker are you driving today?

Mabel 1949 Champion
Hawk 1957 Silverhawk
Gus 1958 Transtar
The Prez 1955 President State
Blu 1957 Golden Hawk
Daisy 1954 Commander Regal Coupe
Fresno,Ca
http://i122.photobucket.com/albums/o269/nw3anne/Mabel.jpg?t=1165475035http://i122.photobucket.com/albums/o269/nw3anne/xmasannecopy.jpghttp://i122.photobucket.com/albums/o269/nw3anne/GusMater.jpghttp://s122.photobucket.com/albums/o269/nw3anne/th_DSCN17232008-01-01.jpghttp://i122.photobucket.com/albums/o269/nw3anne/54%20Commander%20Regal%20Coupe/3539580552_f5500eb0d8-1-1.jpg