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plesmar1947
08-19-2006, 02:09 PM
My studebaker commander has brake issues this is what I have done so far new shoes wheel cylinders rebuilt flushed system with alcohol and bled each wheel starting from the back farthest first but when done the travel on the pedal is to the floor however the brake shoes are moving,again the petal is real soft.your input is welcomed and needed.Only THE MASTER CLYINDER HAS NOT BEEN REBUILT,but seems to work. thanks

[8]Eight Ball

Roscomacaw
08-19-2006, 02:14 PM
Does it have Hill Holder? If so, did you bleed the HH unit too? Shoes all adjusted correctly?[B)]

Miscreant at large.

1957 Transtar 1/2ton
1960 Larkvertible V8
1958 Provincial wagon
1953 Commander coupe
1957 President 2-dr
1955 President State
1951 Champion Biz cpe
1963 Daytona project FS

plesmar1947
08-19-2006, 03:11 PM
Yes, it has a hill holder and no I did not bleed it is there a process of doing that. Or just bleed it at the same time what is bench bleeding this is new to me. MASTER CLYINDER/HILL HOLDER BLEEDING QUESTIONS adjustments to brake linings ok we think but did want to know about a pressure system then the engine doesnt have to run to make adjustments engine under repair as well.

[8]eight ball

Roscomacaw
08-19-2006, 03:22 PM
There should be a screw on top of the HH unit, you loosen it a bit, step gently on the brakes and then tighten the screw when any air is expelled from the unit.:)

Miscreant at large.

1957 Transtar 1/2ton
1960 Larkvertible V8
1958 Provincial wagon
1953 Commander coupe
1957 President 2-dr
1955 President State
1951 Champion Biz cpe
1963 Daytona project FS

64V-K7
08-19-2006, 06:37 PM
You asked about 'bench bleeding' (I think). This is where you take the new MC unit before installing it in the car, place it in a vise or fixture to make it immobile. New or rebuilt units should come with plastic port caps. Sometimes these can be used for bench bleeding, sometimes you have to get a kit from your FLAPS.
Install port fittings in each outlet and use plastic or rubber hose to direct the fluid back into the reservoir. You can use almost anthing here, as there's no real pressure in the return lines.
The object here is to expel all the air from inside the piston chambers, BEFORE installing it in the car.
Fill the reservoir, then with a tool that has a, protective, blunt tip, like a taped over phillips screwdriver and work the action of the piston. Use a slow stroke, as you would, if braking on the road. Slow in, then release. Don't pump it.
When you finally see no bubbles, you're done. Cap it, leave the outlet ports on the unit with the tubes crimped off, to avoid dripping fluid all over. Install it in the car, remove the plastic outlet fittings and connect the cars fittings.
Make sure you install the lines correctly. The port closest to the mounting flange is the front brake line.
If you use silicone fluid, you're going to wind up with a soft pedal no matter what. The stroke will be acceptable, but there are too many microscopic bubbles that stay in suspension and can't be bled out.
You also have to adjust the actuator rod to the proper clearance (free play), which always winds up to be about 1/16 to 1/8 inch. The pedal stroke under your foot translates to a lot smaller stroke at the MC, due to the geometry of the system, so too much play will cause the pedal to go down quite a bit, before engaging the brakes.

blackhawk
08-20-2006, 04:03 AM
quote:If you use silicone fluid, you're going to wind up with a soft pedal no matter what. The stroke will be acceptable, but there are too many microscopic bubbles that stay in suspension and can't be bled out.55Prez - are you just referring to a brake system with a hillholder or any brake system with silicone? I have silicone brake fluid in all my Studebakers and have for years. None of them have a soft pedal. But, none of them have hill holders either. Dale

CHAMP
08-20-2006, 09:20 AM
My 48 Champion has Hill Holder and silicone brake fluid and does not have a soft pedal! I've had silicone in everything from motorcycles to pick-up trucks and never had soft pedal. When I worked for chev we used stainless steel calipers and silicone fluid and didn't have soft pedal. This thread is the only place I've heard of silicone brake fluid and soft pedal.

GARY H 2DR.SEDAN 48 STUDEBAKER CHAMPION NORTHEAST MD.

Dick Steinkamp
08-20-2006, 09:30 AM
quote:Originally posted by 55Prez
If you use silicone fluid, you're going to wind up with a soft pedal no matter what.


Huh [?]...never had that problem in any of my cars that I used silicone fluid in. If that was actually the case, I don't think that any silicone brake fluid would be sold.




http://thenobot.org/images/s2d/s2d_01.jpg

studegary
08-20-2006, 01:31 PM
I am glad that others viewed the silicone brake fluid comment the same way that I did. I have only owned one Studebaker with silicone brake fluid. That car may have had the firmest brake pedal of any Studebaker that I have owned (more than 50).

Gary L.
Wappinger, NY
1954 Commander Starliner (restomod)
1959 DeLuxe pickup (restomod)

Roscomacaw
08-21-2006, 01:31 AM
Been driving my Transtar with silicone fluid in it since '96. I get grat service from it EXCEPT for the fact that the more "fluid" silicone stuff will find places to leak that Dot 3 won't. As such, my hill holder's leaked a drop now and then since I converted. Every year or so it wants a couple of ounces in the master cylinder.:D
I DID convert to a mechanical brake lite switch that's actuated by the brake pedal arm. Has worked for 10 years now![^]

Miscreant at large.

1957 Transtar 1/2ton
1960 Larkvertible V8
1958 Provincial wagon
1953 Commander coupe
1957 President 2-dr
1955 President State
1951 Champion Biz cpe
1963 Daytona project FS