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bams50
03-17-2009, 05:13 PM
This 60 Lark convertible is back, yet again:

http://tinyurl.com/dgbjkr

I'm glad about two things: One, I can't see what condition the frame itself is in and Two, it's still starting at a grand, instead of a couple hundred;) Otherwise, I might be on a road trip to TN for another car I'll never finish[:I]

IMO, this car looks worse than it is. Do the floors and clean it out and it'll look like a whole different car[8D] And me sittin' here with a perfect, rust-free, full floor plan burning a hole in my pocket;)


Not to mention I could be like Dave Arnold[8D]:D


Robert (Bob) Andrews Owner- Studebakeracres- on the IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
Parish, central NY 13131

"Some people live for the rules, I live for exceptions"- 311

"Do they all not, by mere virtue of having survived as relics of a bygone era, amass a level of respect perhaps not accorded to them when they were new?"

KGlowacky
03-17-2009, 05:18 PM
I am so so glad this car is far enough away that the shipping stops me from trying to buy it. To me it is a $300-$400 car if it has a title. I am finishing up my wagon and am considering a conv. like this for my next project. The floors look like my wagon did when I started.

BobGlasscock
03-17-2009, 05:26 PM
Well,,,, I have learned something. I knew that convertible meant it had a top that could be put down to appear as if it had no top. Now I know that "complete missing front seat" means it also has a convertible floor, appearing as if it has no floor at all.

'50 Champion, 1 family owner
http://i251.photobucket.com/albums/gg316/studebakerbob/SDC%20avatar/Studebakerstuff019.jpghttp://i251.photobucket.com/albums/gg316/studebakerbob/SDC%20avatar/Studebakerstuff018.jpg

KGlowacky
03-17-2009, 05:32 PM
Yea, what they didn't mention is the driver and seat still haven't been found. I guess I will make it offical. I am looking for a conv. I am not sure of the final year Studebaker made them but that is the one I want. 65???. Condition is not a factor. In fact the above is the desirable condition, I like a challange.

bams50
03-17-2009, 07:56 PM
Come on, Ken, you're just the kind of guy that little lady needs... help 'er out:)

Robert (Bob) Andrews Owner- Studebakeracres- on the IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
Parish, central NY 13131

"Some people live for the rules, I live for exceptions"- 311

"Do they all not, by mere virtue of having survived as relics of a bygone era, amass a level of respect perhaps not accorded to them when they were new?"

StudeRich
03-17-2009, 08:07 PM
quote:Originally posted by KGlowacky

/Cut/ I am looking for a conv. I am not sure of the final year Studebaker made them but that is the one I want. 65???.

I think you will recall Ken, that all of the '65-'66 Canadian Studebakers were no-frill, bread & butter basic Transportation vehicles, no Avantis, no Hawks, no Champs, no Transtars, no Hardtops, no Daytona Sedans, not even any Challengers, no Daytona Wagonaire in '66 and certainly no Convertibles!

The last convertible was the 1964 Daytona, very rare only about 5 months production.

http://i197.photobucket.com/albums/aa221/studerich/My64Daytona.jpg
StudeRich at Studebakers Northwest -Ferndale,WA

4-speed wagonaire
03-17-2009, 08:12 PM
I almost went to look at that car this weekend. Was in TN for a classic car auction...not a single Studebaker.....the little convert has interested me since the first time it was on ebay. I think it can be saved but then I think most of them can be saved....

Bill, Many Fords and one great Stude!

55s
03-17-2009, 08:22 PM
While to some extent, 65 and 66s may have been "no frill, bread and butter basic", they still had the best and most luxurious interiors ever. Regretfully, there was not as much model choice. However, these cars were well built and excellent drivers too.

Paul

StudeRich
03-17-2009, 08:35 PM
That is entirely true Paul, my son Dave (StudeDave57) has over 280,000 miles on his '65 Cruiser 283 with only the second engine and it's been a great car, no question they were fine cars. As far as I know, Canada has never since, or EVER, had their OWN exclusive car!

But style-wise, sportiness, it sure was limited, all you had was a dressed up to look like a Hardtop "F" Body 2 Dr. Sedan, the Daytona Sport Sedan, that's IT! It was probably a good choice though, because without it, you had NOTHING! :(

jclary
03-17-2009, 08:52 PM
If you click on this guys other items, he also has a 64 wagon. I think his prices are high. However, to have as many transactions with a 100 percent positive rating speaks well for him.

John Clary
Greer, SC
I have only two limitations ...BRAINS & ENERGY
SDC member since 1975

barnlark
03-17-2009, 08:53 PM
Originally posted by bams50
"This 60 Lark convertible is back, yet again:
Not to mention I could be like Dave Arnold"[8D]:D

Didn't you just see how scary that could be at York, funny man? :D :D Picture that car with solid floors and start here..

http://i253.photobucket.com/albums/hh48/newshooter44/DSCN1103.jpg

Spend a couple hours as a hack..

http://i253.photobucket.com/albums/hh48/newshooter44/S7001127.jpg

..and then figure out how to get a few more points next time out.

http://i253.photobucket.com/albums/hh48/newshooter44/DSCN0760.jpg

I'm not convinced that one has enough steel to actually weld floors in from the pictures, Bob. Did anyone get the one that was in Turning Wheels last month? That sounded like a better deal. I've been told there are two '60 converts in a barn about two hours away. If that goes for over 1K, I'll get those and try to be just as persistent as that seller. I'm surprised he hasn't described it as "heavily discussed internationally by the the SDC"!




http://i253.photobucket.com/albums/hh48/newshooter44/DSCN1253_2.jpg

mbstude
03-17-2009, 08:56 PM
One thing I've always wondered...

What's the pipe bracing for, behind the grille, on these cars?

Matthew Burnette
Hazlehurst, GA

http://i280.photobucket.com/albums/kk179/1959S2D/small.jpg

barnlark
03-17-2009, 08:58 PM
That's to hold those green lights you want, Matthew. :D:D:D Support for the frame and convert body..and to keep the cows from the radiator.

KGlowacky
03-17-2009, 09:13 PM
Barnlark, my wagon floors were that bad. Mathew posted the pics on this forum at one time. Rusted 1/2 way up the tunnel. CE had the first approx 20" and I made the rest. Really alot of fun as long as you have the time to walk away every so often to attend to your cuts. Bam, I really would look at it if it was closer. Have a hard time paying more to ship then it is worth. Also can't believe many car transport companies would haul it. I e-mailed the owner asked about a title and Vin tag. What are the chances.

bams50
03-17-2009, 09:16 PM
Dave- those Before and After pix show why I want to be like you... especially the after![8D]

MY HERO.........[^]

Robert (Bob) Andrews Owner- Studebakeracres- on the IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
Parish, central NY 13131

"Some people live for the rules, I live for exceptions"- 311

"Do they all not, by mere virtue of having survived as relics of a bygone era, amass a level of respect perhaps not accorded to them when they were new?"

barnlark
03-17-2009, 09:27 PM
I just wouldn't guess until I saw it and felt it in person. Anything can be fabricated and brought back, I agree. If you think it's worth over a grand sight unseen and are that good of a welder, get it, Ken. I'm certainly not, but I've seen some amazing floor work on this forum. It's absolutely possible for the right person like you. I can't remember what he's turned down so far, but 1K still seems high to me.

KGlowacky
03-17-2009, 10:15 PM
Well that's the problem. I think it is over priced. And I am a little bit aways from starting another project. The wagon is a couple months away. That is why I said if it was close by I would go after it at a lower price and would be able to bring it home for my expenses only. I know he has held strong but at some point I would think he would come down. As far as my welding skills they are getting better, but I still have a long long way to go to match some of the skills on this forum. Bam has the right idea. A complete floor replacement would be the way to go. Anyhow too far and too much right now.

barnlark
03-17-2009, 10:21 PM
I've done two now, so I'm not as excited about that one for even $500. Now if it happened to be a '59-'60 2 door wagon, I might be working on it already. I'm still stinging from how close I got with that one from Texas posted by Bill Elbert.
<sadder frown than the smilies are capable of>

buddymander
03-17-2009, 10:31 PM
It's gotta be worth $995 easy enough of there's a title.How hard could it be to find a rust free tudor floor and build off that? I'm glad it's not closer so I'm not tempted.

barnlark
03-17-2009, 10:38 PM
I know Bob Peterson had quite a few floors on the west coast, but it sure seems any available two doors have one thing in common..and it's not solid floors while the rest is useless.

whacker
03-17-2009, 10:54 PM
Ken, where are you located? I have a 1960 Lark Convertable in much better shape than that one, and a bunch of parts that would go with it for the right price. I am in Iowa, and I plan to go to the Cedar Rapid meet, although not in the convert.

R2Andrea
03-18-2009, 12:05 AM
I couldn't resist so I looked at the sellers '64 Wagonaire. I had NO IDEA that this Studebaker has bolt on Floors and Quarters. Jeez, just when ya think ya know everything.....

R2Andy

R2Andrea
03-18-2009, 12:05 AM
*

StudeRich
03-18-2009, 12:53 AM
quote:Originally posted by R2Andy

I couldn't resist so I looked at the sellers '64 Wagonaire. I had NO IDEA that this Studebaker has bolt on Floors and Quarters. Jeez, just when ya think ya know everything.....R2Andy

Ha! it's missing a whole lot more than this, Quote: "The roof did not have the crank system, but i am sure this can be installed to make the roof slide open." [:0]

It's a fixed roof Wagon, not a Wagonaire! No way that roof is going to ever open without major surgery. [:0]

I WISH they had bolt-in floors! :D

candbstudebakers
03-18-2009, 01:29 AM
You guys must be nuts to even want to take on a rust bucket the likes of that, I just had a super 62 on E-bay and bidding didn't go over $6500.00 nice car , new top, new interior, new paint, v-8 , auto, power steering, bower brakes, new radiator, runs and drives real nice, how much would it take a rust bucket to look good to go to a show?? if a 62 in this shape is not worth $10,000.00 then it should get cut up...Bob

jimmijim8
03-18-2009, 03:22 AM
Bob, I agree with you. It would seem that some folks have more time on their hands than they know what to do with. Some don't, and both types belong to this club. Some think they can beat the system. Usually doesn't happen. I've been there and lost. Experienced people know that usually a nice turn key specimine is less costly in the long run. Raise the price on that car and defy all logic. It'll probably sell to some former illogical convertible restorer. jimmijim

bams50
03-18-2009, 05:12 AM
quote:Originally posted by jimmijim8

It would seem that some folks have more time on their hands than they know what to do with. Some don't, and both types belong to this club. Some think they can beat the system. Usually doesn't happen. I've been there and lost. Experienced people know that usually a nice turn key specimine is less costly in the long run. Raise the price on that car and defy all logic. It'll probably sell to some former illogical convertible restorer.


I don't know how it isn't obvious, but here you go:

1. Believe it or not, some people don't have 10K to just throw down for a toy, but have skills or an interest to learn; so they can spend a few hundred at a time as they get it, and end up with the car they wanted.

2. Some people actually get enjoyment- and satisfaction- out of the challenge of taking a car from basket case to show car. If you had ever done it you'd see it is a great feeling. Some of us find it to be a great stress reliever. As proof I offer Ken Glowacky's comment above: "Condition is not a factor. In fact the above is the desirable condition, I like a challenge."

3. Fixing this one would result in one more being saved. Just so you know, they did stop making 60 Lark convertibles a while back. Some get real satisfaction out of putting another one back on the road, as opposed to sending it to the crusher.

Yes, I know, it's not a big profit maker. And true, if one has to take it to a restoration shop and pay retail price to get it restored it's not worth it. Of course, we always say to buy the best car you can afford, and of course that holds true; but, as I've shown, there are good reasons for an exception to that rule.

As the overused saying goes- "Hope this helps":D

Robert (Bob) Andrews Owner- Studebakeracres- on the IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
Parish, central NY 13131

"Some people live for the rules, I live for exceptions"- 311

"Do they all not, by mere virtue of having survived as relics of a bygone era, amass a level of respect perhaps not accorded to them when they were new?"

BobPalma
03-18-2009, 07:47 AM
quote:Originally posted by bams50


quote:Originally posted by jimmijim8

It would seem that some folks have more time on their hands than they know what to do with. Some don't, and both types belong to this club. Some think they can beat the system. Usually doesn't happen. I've been there and lost. Experienced people know that usually a nice turn key specimine is less costly in the long run. Raise the price on that car and defy all logic. It'll probably sell to some former illogical convertible restorer.


I don't know how it isn't obvious, but here you go:

1. Believe it or not, some people don't have 10K to just throw down for a toy, but have skills or an interest to learn; so they can spend a few hundred at a time as they get it, and end up with the car they wanted.

2. Some people actually get enjoyment- and satisfaction- out of the challenge of taking a car from basket case to show car. If you had ever done it you'd see it is a great feeling. Some of us find it to be a great stress reliever. As proof I offer Ken Glowacky's comment above: "Condition is not a factor. In fact the above is the desirable condition, I like a challenge."

3. Fixing this one would result in one more being saved. Just so you know, they did stop making 60 Lark convertibles a while back. Some get real satisfaction out of putting another one back on the road, as opposed to sending it to the crusher.

Yes, I know, it's not a big profit maker. And true, if one has to take it to a restoration shop and pay retail price to get it restored it's not worth it. Of course, we always say to buy the best car you can afford,

Robert (Bob) Andrews

:) Bob, your input, here, is spot-on and to be appreciated. Perhaps this car is the best one someone can afford, but they have a ton of time and enthusiasm for the project.

It's probably no worse than the Hudson Jet convertible we just discussed in Stove-Hugger's!

We would then hope all here would offer the buyer/restorer encouragement along the way, lest they become overwhelmed. :DBP

4961Studebaker
03-18-2009, 08:23 AM
[:0][:0]OMG where's the floor![:0][:0] Guess one wouldn't have to worry about the car 'collecting' water.......the worry would be mowing any grass that grows in that area.

ChopStu
http://i132.photobucket.com/albums/q14/kkad0711/IMG_5406-1.jpg

KGlowacky
03-18-2009, 08:50 AM
Wacker, I am in Houston,Texas.

BobPalma
03-18-2009, 09:01 AM
:) Interestingly, the May 2009 Hemmings Classic Car arrived in today's mail. It is devoted to do-it-yourself restorations(!) and features photos and reports from 34 different readers who have projects underway. None are finished; all photos are "under construction" to encourage people who might be considering tackling a car such as this '60 Lark convertible.

Hemmings' Editor Richard Lentinello devotes his Editorial to extolling the virtues of hobbyist restorations. He said they got over 125 submissions from the cattle call looking for owner-restoration reports and photos.

In another article, Patrick Foster tackles the topic of why Studebaker went out of business. It's accurate enough, except that he repeats the oft-made mistake of stating that President Abraham Lincoln rode around in a Studebaker carriage.:([:0][V] :DBP

jimmijim8
03-18-2009, 11:09 AM
Everything stated in a previous posters post which quotes something I said in a thread about the convertible is absolutely correct and goes without saying. That's why I didn't say it. DUH! I wasn't born yesterday and have done my share of fixeruppers. I am not new to the collector, special interest car scene. The following read may be of interest to someone new or not well acquainted with Studebakers of the 50's-60's and possibly others or brand x's. I wish that this info had been made available to me way back as I would have avoided a great deal of time and money lost not to mention some frustrating situations.++++++++++ There may be more to think about other than self glorification and frugality when one considers and ultimately decides on resurrecting a rusty, mechanical nightmare of a project. Folks, x-cuse the description. I meant "Dream Machine"vs. a fine original or restored example. Hind sight is 20-20. Yes, some enjoy the challenge, especially if they are themselves capable of conquering, or else have a fat wallet for purchasing nice bolt on replacement parts, or paying for services to individual parts and sort of more or less act as a contractor of services.{restorers I think not}. There are those who actually do absolutely everything but chrome work and whatever have you. {My hat's off to these folks.} Nothing like a bankroll to help show your talents, or somebody else's though. Someone may or may not give a hoot. Some are also incapable of overcoming a restoration challenge. Who cares. Is it the measure of a man to successfully restore a car? No. Still someone will not give a hoot. If you want to spend less time in a bar, which may be a good thing, less time with your wife, unless she is as obsessed as you are so you might as well hire her on as a gofer, less time with your kids,grandchildren, are sick and tired of making craft items, got no life, going to bingo, mother in laws or just want to begin learning a trade in hopes of future employment, get going. Go for it. Restore that car. Perhaps you're the type of person not able to bear owning a fleet of Studebakers or whatever that weren't rescued {from the tin worms} or rescued {for the tin worms|. You just may be a redneck. Here's a good one. Want to read and post less on the forum? Get this. A 10,000$ loan,over a 5 year plan, if one can get it, will cost less than 200.$ per month and your're sure able to buy a nice clean Stude for half that or less. Trust me. An antique only car loan is gettable if the lender holds the title. There are Antique, special interest auto loan companies out there . It may have 4 doors but you won't be dismissed because of ownership. Just think,a turn key unit and you're likely to drive it to the weekend cruise immediately after plates and insurance. Just remember, this little insignificant piece of information. You are not guaranteed a profit upon resale but if you choose carefully you can't loose. When shopping, take an informed person along with you. If you are buying a known to be project or an ascerted really good car. Ask questions. If you do decide on a project, remember. You'll have the initial cost of car plus payments while you can't drive it. If you can afford only junk right now, maybe you would be better to refrain from buying and start saving for the right one to come along. There are always going to be more Studebakers for sale than the market is willing to provide homes for. Nice cars and not nice money pits. I follow e-bay sales closely and can attest to the fact that most really nice Studebakers that sell there are purchased cheaper than fixing up a like one in ragged shape. Pros and Cons Restore or buy? Not for everybody either way. Money wise, when it all washes out. it's a no brainer. I am just as proud of my Hawk had I done it myself. I had the good fortune of buying a nice low mileage survivor. The one that I did do ,I am proud of it also as the new owner told some folks that he had restored it over one winter season. Funny, It was in pieces in my garage for a total of about 15 years. Lots and l

jnormanh
03-18-2009, 11:22 AM
quote:Originally posted by StudeRich

That is entirely true Paul, my son Dave (StudeDave57) has over 280,000 miles on his '65 Cruiser 283 with only the second engine and it's been a great car, no question they were fine cars. As far as I know, Canada has never since, or EVER, had their OWN exclusive car!



Bricklin?

KGlowacky
03-18-2009, 11:35 AM
jimmijim, WOW calm down, we are bouncing idea's back and forth. One reason someone may want this car at a low price is because they are going to build a custom and do not want to cut up a good $6500.00 car, such as yours. They are only going to use the title and body. The frame, drivetrain, interior will be custom. So for lets say $500 you get a title, a conv. body that no one else wants and will put one more Stude back on the road. I have restored more then 10 cars in my life and I agree it is cheaper to buy then build but all of my cars are sold within a year after completion as I enjoy the building not the driving. I believe it keeps my mind sharpe and keeps me young. It is a 50/50 chance I will get all my money back. My father used to say that why they make different flavors of Ice Cream, everyone has different taste.

jimmijim8
03-18-2009, 12:16 PM
Ken, not upset and only posted so as to offer some concise 2 sided information on a subject that everybody may not be aware of. Someone that knows me not, or else should know better, felt compelled to use something I said as in "quote" in a posting he made which inferred that I was above, or ignorant to the facts as to why someone wants to restore junk for more $$ than a nice specimine's market price. "Duh! No chit Sherlock. Is that the only reasoning why cars are restored" Disregard the previous quoted message Ken. Someone who knows better has too much time on his hands. Not part of our conversation I don't have a 6500.00 car. You might be confused with a convertible car that was bid up to that amount but did not make reserve. Belongs to Bob Peterson. 62 convertible. I am afraid his car is worth much more . jimmijim

stude_s
03-18-2009, 01:08 PM
Guys & Gals,

We must appreciate everyone’s tastes and abilities. Yes, many love the build, others love that finished turn key car and yet some like the almost there just needs a little work car. It’s great that everyone can provide their input and lessons learned without others taking to as a cut to the heart (this is needed to keep the club alive).

Yes, I know what does this “kid” know …well having being a third generation Studebaker guy who was shunned from the club as a teen – early twenties only to return in his late thirties with a young family in mind I truly admire the information – personal reflections that are provided by all senior members. :D

I truly love how the forum has changed over the last several months!

KGlowacky
03-18-2009, 01:54 PM
jimjim, All is OK I repspect your opinion. In general I bet 85% of all projects are never finished. Sorry about the $6500 comment got confused.

jnormanh
03-18-2009, 04:41 PM
quote:There are those who actually do absolutely everything but chrome work and whatever have you.


Jeepers jimmijim8. I've done five total restorations, including doing my own chrome work. On all those cars the only thing I paid someone else to do was some sewing on one car.

It's got nothing to do with money - at least not for me, and I suspect for many others too.

Part of it is just as an enjoyable hobby - someone else might spend their time drowning worms, or chasing a little white ball. Different strokes.

Part of it is because I want to know I can jump in a car I've restored, and head for California with no worries, because I know every nut and bolt is right. Part of it is nostalgia. Part of it is...soul.

I could have bought all of those cars in decent condition for less than I spent, even doing everything myself.

I have since sold four of them for what I was out of pocket, and glad to get it.

Nobody, but nobody, owns and drives a Studebaker or any other fifty year car because it's the fastest, or most reliable or a good investment.

I don't "get" golf. My golfing friends don't "get" grease and skinned knuckles.

bams50
03-18-2009, 05:41 PM
I wrote a long response, and when I hit "post" it disappeared... so I guess I'll just go back to the subject of the car itself, even if that makes me "illogical". My apologies to thse who just cannot understand the idea of preserving cars that havent been built for 40 plus years- that's your cross to bear[|)]

I wrote the seller and told him he might want to add that everything this car would need is readily available, and at good prices. I also mentioned that his price was too high.

If he lowers the starting price and nobody bids, I will!

Robert (Bob) Andrews Owner- Studebakeracres- on the IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
Parish, central NY 13131

"Some people live for the rules, I live for exceptions"- 311

"Do they all not, by mere virtue of having survived as relics of a bygone era, amass a level of respect perhaps not accorded to them when they were new?"

candbstudebakers
03-19-2009, 10:58 AM
This sure has been taken around the block a few times, with me living on the west coast but being from Minnesota growing up I know a little about both as far as rust and junk bodies, when I first posted about someone being nuts to want to do one with so much rust and all, it was just a statement and nothing personal, how many of use out there is Studebaker land has a patch on is or hers jacket that says "Studebaker Nut"???? I know I do and also one on my grandsons jacket,so enough said about the word nut. I was a little up set with the out come on the auction of the 62 Daytona but also know we are in hard times and hard times brings out the true Studebaker person still wanting to take on a project, I also know there are some Studebakers that should just not be scrapped, and any convert. is one of them. People that know me know I go out of my way to save and try to get parts in to the right hands of people needing them, also every one can have their own opinion on any subject with out it being personal. This forum is a good place to voice your opinion so lets keep it not personal and get in others face, thanks guys and gals..Bob Peterson from California.

candbstudebakers
03-19-2009, 11:04 AM
Sorry about the post just before this one, some how my computer went nuts and printed my message more than once, I am still learning how to use this thing besides on E-Bay..I don't want some one taking off on this as a subject to beat to death, thanks and again I am sorry this happened......Bob Peterson

BobPalma
03-19-2009, 12:47 PM
quote:Originally posted by candbstudebakers

Sorry about the post just before this one, some how my computer went nuts and printed my message more than once, I am still learning how to use this thing besides on E-Bay..I don't want some one taking off on this as a subject to beat to death, thanks and again I am sorry this happened......Bob Peterson


:) Bob: It's easy to remove the extra material.

Click on the little "pencil & paper" icon above your post. Your post will reappear for you to edit or delete at will.

Delete all the duplicate material and anything else you don't want to appear. Then click on the box below the text that says, "Post Changes."

Presto; extra material will have been removed. :DBP

starliner62
03-19-2009, 01:52 PM
I just thought Bob had the hiccups!:D:D

Jamie McLeod
Hope Mills, NC

BShaw
03-19-2009, 02:11 PM
Keep the personal stuff out or I'll have to lock or delete this.

http://i61.photobucket.com/albums/h53/StudeRobert/Chill.gif

BShaw, Webmaster

http://www.studebakerdriversclub.com/images/StudeDriveLogo_small.jpg
webmaster@studebakerdriversclub.com
Woodbury, Minnesota

8E45E
03-19-2009, 02:56 PM
quote:Originally posted by StudeRich
As far as I know, Canada has never since, or EVER, had their OWN exclusive car!


The ONLY indigenous Canadian automobile manufacturer was Russell Motor Car which was made from 1905 to 1914. It built its own version of the Knight sleeve-valve engine, bodies, and most other chassis components. As you mentioned, anything else built in Canada was either a branch plant of a US firm, or an 'assembled' vehicle made from proprietary components.

Craig

buddymander
03-19-2009, 05:27 PM
I havent seen an example of my reasoning to buy a car in such sad shape rather than one that was finished, but maybe I overlooked it. I bet many have had the same experience as me; where you buy a nice looking car, get it home , and then really give it the looking over, and find major flaws that were hidden by unscrupulous car flippers. That is such a huge disappointment, that one might resolve to, in the future, "Do it yourself to make sure it's right" from then on. I can SEE what a mess that lil ragtop is, so I'm confident that I'm getting what I'm paying for, but with some "restored" cars I might be spending a lot of dough only to end up tearing it apart to do it right.

bams50
03-19-2009, 05:38 PM
Excellent point, Buddy[^]

Robert (Bob) Andrews Owner- Studebakeracres- on the IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
Parish, central NY 13131

"Some people live for the rules, I live for exceptions"- 311

"Do they all not, by mere virtue of having survived as relics of a bygone era, amass a level of respect perhaps not accorded to them when they were new?"

8E45E
03-19-2009, 06:13 PM
quote:Originally posted by jnormanh


quote:Originally posted by StudeRich

That is entirely true Paul, my son Dave (StudeDave57) has over 280,000 miles on his '65 Cruiser 283 with only the second engine and it's been a great car, no question they were fine cars. As far as I know, Canada has never since, or EVER, had their OWN exclusive car!



Bricklin?


Although it was made in Canada, Safety Vehicle Corp. was a 100% U.S. owned company with its namesake as the CEO. And even if it was a Canadian company, the engine was still from AMC or Ford.

Craig

bridgegaurd
03-19-2009, 06:14 PM
quote:Originally posted by bams50


I don't know how it isn't obvious, but here you go:


2. Some people actually get enjoyment- and satisfaction- out of the challenge of taking a car from basket case to show car. If you had ever done it you'd see it is a great feeling. Some of us find it to be a great stress reliever. As proof I offer Ken Glowacky's comment above: "Condition is not a factor. In fact the above is the desirable condition, I like a challenge."

[brown]Robert (Bob) Andrews Owner- Studebakeracres- on the IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
Parish, central NY 13131


[/quote]If we were in it for anything but the joy we get from it (and the addtiction we aquire along the way). There wouldn't be much two it. This ain't wall street this is knuckle butin, fool hardy fun. Car nuts doing what car nuts do, if i had the mony i've thrown at old cars, new cars, and race cars, i'd be sitting in a mansion by the bay watching girls wiggle by. Instead i'm in a garage dreaming about a girl on a creeper under a Golden Hawk. It ain't supposed to make sense. It just what we do. And foolish or not there are some great cars that come out of playing with our toys.

8E45E
03-19-2009, 06:29 PM
quote:Originally posted by bridgegaurd

2. Some people actually get enjoyment- and satisfaction- out of the challenge of taking a car from basket case to show car. If you had ever done it you'd see it is a great feeling. Some of us find it to be a great stress reliever. As proof I offer Ken Glowacky's comment above: "Condition is not a factor. In fact the above is the desirable condition, I like a challenge."


About a year and a half ago, BP e-mailed me (and several others here) a link to Cuda-world. The online issue that month profiled a severely crushed '71 Cuda, a rare and desirable car that got fully restored. The link has since been deleted, and I didn't save any of the before and after images of it. Perhaps BP or someone else did, and can post them here. It shows if one was able to restore that poor Cuda, no Studebaker would be impossible to restore, including this Lark.

Craig.

KGlowacky
03-19-2009, 08:13 PM
Just heard from the owner of the poor Lark. NO TITLE but a VIN # in the door jam.

Dick Steinkamp
03-19-2009, 08:26 PM
quote:Originally posted by bridgegaurd
It ain't supposed to make sense. It just what we do.


Quote of the week! [^]

Dick Steinkamp
Bellingham, WA

http://i706.photobucket.com/albums/ww63/dstnkmp/pics075-1-1.jpg

candbstudebakers
03-19-2009, 10:25 PM
Who ever fixed up my message thank you, was it you Bob Palma? if so thanks next month when Dick is down we will be getting together and I can learn more, thanks again....Bob Peterson