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63larkcustom
12-04-2006, 11:05 PM
Hi all, I just received my paint. Is there anything special that must be done prior to applying it? I've wire brushed and cleaned the floors. Thanks in advance.

Bob Sporner
63 Lark Regal 4dr sedan

Dick Steinkamp
12-04-2006, 11:31 PM
POR recommends their Marine Clean, then their Metal Ready, then the POR 15

http://www.por15.com/

Check the FAQ's in this site also.



http://static.flickr.com/100/301465853_2dbe07b7c6_m.jpg
Dick Steinkamp
Bellingham, WA

Roscomacaw
12-04-2006, 11:49 PM
If your floors were uniformly rusty, I'd say slop it on. Since they're not, as Dick says, you ought to follow their recommendations.
I can tell you from experience - you put POR-15 on a nice, clean metal surface and it sticks like glue - until it's "cured" in a couple of days. Then you'll be dismayed at how easily it flakes off without much provocation.:( Same way over cleaned and/or sanded paint or primer - a waste of money.[8]

Miscreant adrift in
the BerStuda Triangle!!

1957 Transtar 1/2ton
1960 Larkvertible V8
1958 Provincial wagon
1953 Commander coupe

DilloCrafter
12-04-2006, 11:52 PM
I'm glad Biggsy drove that point home about preparing it just right or it's a waste of money. Do like Dick said, and go to their website to get the full instructions. And definitely get that Marine Clean and their Metal Prep. Might as well do it right, and with POR-15, there is only one way - their way. Many of us know, there is no room for error or experimentation with that stuff. And wear long rubber gloves, because that stuff will not come off of you, not even with acetone, after the first few minutes.

http://rocketdillo.com/studebaker/misc/images/Avacar-hcsdc.gif[/img=left]DilloCrafter

1955 1/2 Ton Pickup
[i]The Red-Headed Amazon
Deep in the heart of Texas

stuvw2mny
12-05-2006, 01:27 AM
Hey, this answers a question I have had for a long time about POR-15. I am now sure that I want to find alternatives. What is the opinion of the group about using epoxy resin on top of lightly rusted floor-boards? Of course I would remove all the rust I could and also use some phosphoric acid product to further neutralize the metal before applying the epoxy. The objective is to protect the metal from further rusting. If there are a few places where the metal is thin after the rust removal I could apply some fiberglass matting during the epoxy installation. Anybody done this? Comments??? Yes, I know there is a point where the floorboards would be too rusty to use this technique and would require welding in replacement panels.

Another technique that was available 30 years ago for the underneath and hard to reach locations was a rust neutralizer in a light grease, applied from a spray can. It was marketed by Texaco. It was especially useful on the inside of doors, at the lower seam. Is anything like that available now? Yes, I know it would drive concours nuts crazy, but they aren't the only people in the world.

Finally has anybody had any experience with galvanizing or zinc-rich sprays?

63larkcustom
12-05-2006, 08:09 AM
Thanks for the heads up guys. I did the marine clean...but not the metal prep. I'll be ordering that shortly.



Bob Sporner
Palm Springs, California

DilloCrafter
12-05-2006, 09:17 AM
Good, Bob, I'm glad you'll be doing it the only way that works for that system.

As for the epoxy route stuvw2many is thinking about, I simply can't say. It SEEMS like a good thick coat of epoxy would permanently encapsulate the rust, so that no air or moisture could "feed" the rust anymore (that's the principal with POR-15). But I really don't know. You ought to do a search in this forum for "rust treatment" or "rust products" or "POR-15" to see past topics where people here have tried different products that they feel works as well or better than POR-15, but without the need for following such precise details to get it to work. I think one is called "Rust Bullet", but I know that other products have been mentioned.

You may want to check out POR-15's website for some of their other products that work together with POR-15. I used something they make that is basically fiberglass jelly embedded with little strands of fiberglass. Works fantastic. But, it may be the exact same stuff you can now get made by Bondo at your FLAPS, which appears to be the same thing. It's good for bridging pinholes and spreading over areas that are thin due to rust eating the metal away. I have confidence in my floorboards now.

http://rocketdillo.com/studebaker/misc/images/Avacar-hcsdc.gif[/img=left]DilloCrafter

1955 1/2 Ton Pickup
[i]The Red-Headed Amazon
Deep in the heart of Texas

dictator27
12-05-2006, 07:40 PM
Anybody tried Bill Hirsch's products? The antique auto parts place here (Langley British Columbia) used to stock POR-15 but dropped it in favour of Hirsch's products because there was so much prep work involved with POR-15.


Terry Godkin
27 Dictator Sedan
54 Commander Starliner

Studebayker
12-05-2006, 08:25 PM
I have used Rustoleum since it was introduced, especially the
rusty metal primer. You can prime over it, and top coat it with
any paint. No special cleaning, other than brush off the loose
stuff, and clean off the grease,and oil.



James K. Clark
Rutledge Tenn.
'55 Prez. 2dr Hdtp.
Don't take yourself too seriously!

James K. Clark

rockne10
12-05-2006, 09:41 PM
I probably clean off more rust than necessary, but then use Dupont 5717S and 5718S to neutralize and etch what's left. The surface is then ready for whatever primer you prefer. An epoxy etching primer is probably overkill but I really don't want to do it a second time.

Once you go with the POR15, play by their rules.

Just about anything we do is more than the factory did, and the majority of our vehicles probably won't be subjected to the weathering they were subjected to when they were new.

Brad Johnson
Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
33 Rockne 10
51 Commander Starlight
53 Commander Starlight
http://i57.photobucket.com/albums/g233/rockne10/51x2.jpg
previously: 63 Cruiser, 62 Regal VI, 60 VI convertible, 50 LandCruiser

63larkcustom
12-06-2006, 11:21 AM
Here is the completed floor. Thanks for the help guys


http://i104.photobucket.com/albums/m190/63larkcustom/pride2006050.jpg

Bob Sporner
Palm Springs, California

bams50
12-06-2006, 10:46 PM
Looks great!

I'm getting ready to do the same to my Lark; please update us in a week or 2 on how well it hardens up and STICKS to the metal!

Robert K. Andrews Owner- IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
Parish, central NY 13131
http://www.cardomain.com/ride/2358680/1

63larkcustom
12-07-2006, 12:52 AM
Sure thing!

Bob Sporner
Palm Springs, California

Challenger
12-11-2006, 01:11 AM
quote:Originally posted by stuvw2mny

.

Another technique that was available 30 years ago for the underneath and hard to reach locations was a rust neutralizer in a light grease, applied from a spray can. It was marketed by Texaco. It was especially useful on the inside of doors, at the lower seam. Is anything like that available now?
3M has a aerosol products called "Rust Fighter I" and Rust Fighter E" that fits this description. I've used "I" on the insides of doors and hard to reach areas on quarters and fenders to protect them after welding, which burns any paint off of the inside, and leaves them rust prone. An extra large can of this was about $12 several years ago.

JDP
12-11-2006, 01:41 AM
The fiberglass putty stuff is called Tiger Hair;


http://www.rcustomcar.com/Tiger-Hair-Long-Strand-Fiberglass-Filler-Gallon-P758C0.aspx

http://stude.com/sig.jpg
JDP
Arnold Md.
Studebaker On The Net
http://stude.com
My Ebay Items
http://www.stude.com/EBAY/

64 GT hawk
63 R2 4 speed GT Hawk (Black)
63 R2 4 speed GT Hawk (Black) #2
63 Avanti R1
63 Daytona convert
63 Lark 2 door
62 Lark 2 door
60 Hawk
59 3E truck
52 Starlight
52 Starliner
51 Commander

bams50
12-11-2006, 06:26 AM
...and if you want the reiforcement factor of fiberglass but don't like the long strands, there's Duraglas; uses chopped instead of shredded fiberglass.

I have used tons of both in my day and personally prefer Duraglas; just looks neater...

It should be noted that neither of the above are a high-quality repair; they can be used for bridging small holes, but do not treat or stop rust long-term. I've seen it used for filling body holes- mixing it, spreading it about 2" thick on magazine paper, then slapping it over a pre-prepped rust hole (ground clean and trimmed of rust)... when it starts to set up, the paper can be peeled off; then ground to contour and finished with bondo. Looks great for a month or 2, then starts lifting and bubbling [xx(]

If you want to use either, they do work pretty well; just consider them a temporary patch.

Spelling note: I'm never quite sure if it's spelled, "fiberglas" or "fiberglass"... seen it both ways...[^]

Robert K. Andrews Owner- IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
Parish, central NY 13131
http://www.cardomain.com/ride/2358680/1

63larkcustom
12-11-2006, 09:18 AM
The POR-15 seems to be holding up well.. no flakes, etc yet. I think its gonna stick.

Bob Sporner
Palm Springs, California

studeclunker
12-11-2006, 01:49 PM
Looks great Bob! Keep us posted. I for one am very interested. My wagons have some rust in the front, no holes, just lots of surface rust. Looks like a good way to prevent it from getting any worse.

http://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b18/Studeclunker/studebaby/54wagonblue-2.jpghttp://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b18/Studeclunker/studebaby/red54wagon-1.jpg
Lotsa Larks!
K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
Ron Smith

63larkcustom
12-11-2006, 07:48 PM
I'm very pleased with it. the floor seems a bit stiffer than it was before if thats possible (perhaps a bit of wishful thinking) but all in all i think it was a good fix.

Bob Sporner
Palm Springs, California

ralt12
12-20-2006, 12:25 PM
POR-15, for us, has proven to be an extremely tough surface coating. It took a lot of time and effort, and you really do need to take precautions not to get the stuff on you--it takes a long time to get it off bare skin.

The trunk area in silver:
http://nelson-motorsports.com/109-0935_IMG.JPG

The rear fender area in battleship grey:
http://nelson-motorsports.com/109-0934_IMG.JPG

'53 Commander

Randy_G
01-18-2007, 09:41 PM
I thought I would update this post and ask a couple of questions? Its been a almost a onth since you applied the POr-15 on your floorboards how do they look now and can you paint over them afterwards or would you want to? I know parts of the floors in the Lark are grass colored until its parked over dirt then they are dirt colored so I will be in the market for this product.

Randy_G
www.AutomotiveHistoryOnline.com
http://www.automotivehistoryonline.com/small59.jpg

bradnree
01-18-2007, 10:16 PM
I use Rustoleum...........Brad

63larkcustom
01-18-2007, 11:23 PM
HI Guys, The floor looks exactly as it did in the photos.. no flaking, peeling, etc. Just follow the directions and you will be pleased. I will be painting over mine.. but thats a ways off yet.

Bob Sporner
Palm Springs, California

Original50
01-19-2007, 05:25 AM
quote:Originally posted by 63larkcustom

HI Guys, The floor looks exactly as it did in the photos.. no flaking, peeling, etc. Just follow the directions and you will be pleased. I will be painting over mine.. but thats a ways off yet.

Bob Sporner
Palm Springs, California


Bob, you will need to use the POR15 Tie Coat Primer if you plan to paint over the cured POR15 paints with Acrylic paints. Since the POR15 has NO pores, other paints will not stick to it after it sets up. You could have painted over top of it it it had not set up (paint it while it is still sticky). My referencees comes from a POR15 distributor who live 1 mile from me, Gary Chrisman at 336-449-5407 or 336-449-6108

Don Dodson

63larkcustom
01-19-2007, 12:43 PM
Thanks Don! Saved a potential heartbreak..

Bob Sporner
Palm Springs, California

Harv
01-19-2007, 08:53 PM
Now for my few cents. POR-15 is good stuff. Used it back in '94 on the frame-on resto of my '50 Champ Starlight Coupe. Coated (brush) the entire frame, top/bottoms of welded in new flooring & trunk, back side of all fenders, entire underhood area and backs of bumpers. You MUST wear protection and have NO EXPOSED skin as it won't come off except with time. I use a face shield & Nitrile Gloves (very cheap to buy at Harbour Freight!) to prevent brush splash from ruining by pail skin. I always have some on hand for touch-ups. The small can 6-pack is very handy, not cost wise, but overall a good thing to buy. [8D]

StudeBakerHarv

chocolate turkey
01-20-2007, 09:59 AM
As far back as 1975, I used a rust paint, RustOleum, or equivelent, then, when dry, used a good roofing tar that set up but never hardened over it. I filled the seams of my fenders (1964 Commander) and any other place that moisture could penetrate and then painted over it again as a finish in whatever color was appropriate.
The car lasted 225,000 miles, 25 yrs. without a problem in the treated areas.

Brian K. Curtis

Donald Erickson
01-21-2007, 10:31 AM
I also used POR-15 when I did the floor of my '53 Studebaker back last July. I used the metal prep and cleaner from por-15 on the new steel and the rusted areas I took a steel brush on my angel grinder and removed a good amount of rust before cleaning it and POR-15 coating it. It still looks as good as the day I brushed it on! When I positioned my front seat with the rails and brackets I slid the hole set up over the 3-day old POR-15 and not one scratch was made. This stuff is TUFF;)! I was sold on RustOleum products before this, but went to POR-15 after testing RustOleum on my rusted '51 GMC truck frame and found that I needed something better then RustOleum. I will use RustOleum spray cans on small rust-free parts, but nothing else.

Donald Erickson
Bemidji, MN
1953 Champion (project)
1956 Commander (driver)http://i85.photobucket.com/albums/k77/DonaldErickson/mystudes_0015.jpg

Donald Erickson
01-21-2007, 10:35 AM
POR-15 PORPATCH works great for small pin holes and building up thin spots!

Donald Erickson
Bemidji, MN
1953 Champion (project)
1956 Commander (driver)http://i85.photobucket.com/albums/k77/DonaldErickson/mystudes_0015.jpg