PDA

View Full Version : Diesels - What years and models?



mausersmth
01-30-2009, 02:43 PM
In an attempt to improve my education, I'm interested in when Studebaker offered a diesel engine (I know there are a few experimental diesels, but I'm talking about production models offered to the public) What years, models and engines were involved?
Thanks!

Charles Eck
Essex, MD

'57 Commander 4 door sedan, 'Bluebird'
'66 Ford F-250
'53 John Deere 50

Studebakers were made to drive! (Besides, they don't get lost as easy in the Wal-Mart parking lot!)

coyote
01-30-2009, 03:07 PM
I'm not an expert, but all the Studebaker diesel trucks I have seen were all Detroit Diesel powered, 53 series engines. The 53 stands for 53 cubic inches per cylinder.

Steve
Minden, Nevada

1950 2R5 truck
1960 Hawk R1 4 speed project

studelark
01-30-2009, 07:27 PM
Charles; The history of Studebaker diesel truck production came in two phases, pre-WWII and post-WWII.

Pre-WWII- Diesel trucks produced in the 1937 and 1938 model years. The engine used in these trucks was the Hercules model DJXB 6 cylinder diesel engine that produced 77 horsepower. There were 37 J20D diesel trucks built in 1937 and 49 K20D model trucks built in 1938. Production then ceased as the numbers did not justify continuation as the company's 'truck thinking' was moving away from the larger J and K models to the up-coming M series in 1941. The M series was a lighter truck line using Studebaker engines exclusively.

Post-WWII- The Studebaker Corp. made a more concerted effort in the early 1960's to bring diesel power to its truck line. Studebaker engineers saw the writing on the wall that diesel trucks were the future. Unfortunately, the bean-counters in the Corp. did not give the engineers a lot of help.

Studebaker got serious about diesel trucks in the 1961 model year. A number of prototypes were successfully built and the truck folks were ready to introduce their diesel trucks as model 6E's in the Spring of 1961. In fact, the first factory diesel literature, PD-61-75 and PD-61-79 are 1961 brochures. But a decision was made to hold introduction until the 1962 model year.

For the 1962 model year, the new 7E series of trucks were introduced which included 1 1/2 (7E35), 2 (7E45A) and 2 ton HD (7E45E) rated chassis with diesel engines. These models were offered in a selection of five (5) wheelbases from 131" to 195". The only engine offered in 1962 was General Motors Detroit Diesel 4-53 model (four cylinders) of 212 cubic inches producing 130 horsepower. For the 1963 and 1964 model years, Studebaker offered two (2) smaller diesel trucks, the E15 1 ton and the E25 light 1 1/2 ton chassis. These trucks were provided with the General Motors 3-53 model engine (three cylinders) of 159 cubic inches producing 97 horsepower. All diesel truck manufacturing ceased in the 1964 model year when the South Bend facility closed permanently.

If you have other questions about Studebaker diesel trucks, just ask. Yes, there were other diesel vehicles, even cars, built both as experimental and production models using foreign built engines. Hope this answers your questions.:)

Frank Drumheller
Louisa, VA
60S-W6
1948 M16-52 Boyer fire truck

mbstude
01-30-2009, 07:50 PM
Check this out, Charles...

http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.com/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=16107

Matthew Burnette
Hazlehurst, GA

mausersmth
01-31-2009, 01:23 PM
Now the question is, which one would make the best tow vehicle for that three or four car gooseneck trailer I want?[8D]

Charles Eck
Essex, MD

'57 Commander 4 door sedan, 'Bluebird'
'66 Ford F-250
'53 John Deere 50

Studebakers were made to drive! (Besides, they don't get lost as easy in the Wal-Mart parking lot!)

jclary
01-31-2009, 03:58 PM
Charles, from what I am reading in your posts, you seem to be very serious about shows and competing. One thing I like about the Stude’s is that they are not as common as the Chevy’s, Ford’s, and Mopar’s. In shows like AACA events, you face negative popularity prejudice and often encounter ignorant judges. However, the fact that you show up in a Studebaker with “paint all over it” can be an advantage! I have seen Mustangs and ’57 Chevy’s checked with white gloves. Never a Studebaker.
In my younger days, it was all about the show and the trophies. Now I am happy to just attend the events, show a car if I take one, make new friends, and talk with old friends.
As far as diesels…I have driven many and ridden in a couple of Stude diesels. Unless you are hell bent to do a stock Studebaker diesel, my suggestion would be to look for a late model diesel chassis with full-computerized EFI. With the current economy, independent truckers are parking and walking away from trucks in droves. As long as were dreaming,[8D] a box truck chassis, (or small motor home), topped off with a Studebaker cab would be the way to go. One of the biggest challenges will be to dampen and insulate the truck so that you could hear yourself think! A few club members have military trucks, dump trucks, and I think a couple of 5th wheel tractors. Try to find one and take a ride. If anyone in your area has an old Mack H model that could give you a similar experience. That would give you an idea of what a long trip hauling your Studiebabes would be like. My fertile imagination can go wild when it is dreaming of spending your money and not mine!:)
http://i518.photobucket.com/albums/u346/jconln/avitar48-2.jpg

John Clary
Greer, SC
SDC member since 1975

PackardV8
01-31-2009, 04:51 PM
X2 on the reality of the noise. The folloing is JMHO and your opinions may differ:

We've all seen the beautiful Stude Diesel restorations, and they do sound so cool coming into the show grounds. However. the longest, most uncomfortable Studebaker summer afternoon I ever spent was on the highway in a C-cab 3-53 with a chrome vertical side stack. I expected the ride to be rough and it was, but add the heat and the din from the engine and the exhaust and it was literally painful. After that ride, I wouldn't have driven the truck home if it were free. Suggest before laying out big bucks on a Stude Diesel, put in a day driving one through traffic and on the highway loaded and unloaded.

thnx, jack vines

P.S. - this after driving a C-cab '55 3/4t 4-speed for the past 29 years, so my tolerance for rough, hot and noisy is pretty high. ;)

PackardV8

mausersmth
02-01-2009, 10:41 AM
Spent many hours as a kid riding in 1 1/2 to 2 ton trucks with my Dad. He did excavating and used a '57 Dodge tractor and an early '60's Ford flatbed to transport his machines.

Maybe I should look for a 'glider kit', a truck with no drive line that I could drop a late model Cummins or Cat into, along with a more modern rear axle. (Looks like Div. 9 for this one, eh?)

Like Fozzie in The Muppet Movie, Studebakers are my natural habitat! I know how to work on them, I know where to get parts, they don't lose value like a new car, (Lost $22k selling a three year old Volvo once![:0]) and I love the conversations I get into in parking lots and stuff! (Delivered Pizza with my '57 a few times! Should have heard the comments!)

I figure on taking three years to get the '57 in shape. I want to try to keep it up, a new project every three to five years. I'm building them to drive, my only Brand X that I intend to keep is my uncle's '66 F-250! (He bought it new, it's family!) Main purpose for showing them is to share what I've done and see how it stacks up to others. I'm looking down the road a project or two because I know one day I'll need a tow vehicle and I'm NOT using a Brand X! I want a '57 - '64 Transtar!

Charles Eck
Essex, MD

'57 Commander 4 door sedan, 'Bluebird'
'66 Ford F-250
'53 John Deere 50

Studebakers were made to drive! (Besides, they don't get lost as easy in the Wal-Mart parking lot!)