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lstude
12-03-2006, 11:49 AM
While I was looking through the 58 Studebaker Accessories catalog for another thread, I ran accross this interesting item. It is called Minit Heat. Has anyone ever seen one of these? Were they ever put on a car and how did they work? Maybe some of you Canadians have seen them. Or was it like the mechanical power steering that was introduced in 53 but was quickly discontinued?.
http://i99.photobucket.com/albums/l288/lstude/58StudebakeraccessoriescatalogMinit.jpg


Leonard Shepherd, editor, The Commanding Leader, Central Virginia Chapter, http://centralvirginiachapter.org/
http://i99.photobucket.com/albums/l288/lstude/Mein64Daytonasm.jpghttp://i99.photobucket.com/albums/l288/lstude/52inyardsm-1.jpg

r1lark
12-03-2006, 12:23 PM
There was one on eBay a couple of years ago, and I saw one at a swap meet (one of the Nationals maybe) probably 15 years ago.

Paul

Visit The Studebaker Skytop Registry website at: http://hometown.aol.com/r1skytop/myhomepage/index.html

r1lark
12-03-2006, 12:23 PM
There was one on eBay a couple of years ago, and I saw one at a swap meet (one of the Nationals maybe) probably 15 years ago.

Paul

Visit The Studebaker Skytop Registry website at: http://hometown.aol.com/r1skytop/myhomepage/index.html

lstude
12-03-2006, 12:26 PM
It says it connects to the fuel pump, so I assume this was a gasoline heater!

Leonard Shepherd, editor, The Commanding Leader, Central Virginia Chapter, http://centralvirginiachapter.org/
http://i99.photobucket.com/albums/l288/lstude/Mein64Daytonasm.jpghttp://i99.photobucket.com/albums/l288/lstude/52inyardsm-1.jpg

lstude
12-03-2006, 12:26 PM
It says it connects to the fuel pump, so I assume this was a gasoline heater!

Leonard Shepherd, editor, The Commanding Leader, Central Virginia Chapter, http://centralvirginiachapter.org/
http://i99.photobucket.com/albums/l288/lstude/Mein64Daytonasm.jpghttp://i99.photobucket.com/albums/l288/lstude/52inyardsm-1.jpg

showbizkid
12-03-2006, 01:29 PM
Notice the copy doesn't claim it improves fuel economy! :D


[img=left]http://members.cox.net/clarknovak/lark.gif[/img=left]

Clark in San Diego
'63 F2/Lark Standard
http://studeblogger.blogspot.com

showbizkid
12-03-2006, 01:29 PM
Notice the copy doesn't claim it improves fuel economy! :D


[img=left]http://members.cox.net/clarknovak/lark.gif[/img=left]

Clark in San Diego
'63 F2/Lark Standard
http://studeblogger.blogspot.com

lstude
12-03-2006, 01:34 PM
I guess they didn't sell enough of them for the owners to experience fires like some Corvair owners did! :D:D

Leonard Shepherd, editor, The Commanding Leader, Central Virginia Chapter, http://centralvirginiachapter.org/
http://i99.photobucket.com/albums/l288/lstude/Mein64Daytonasm.jpghttp://i99.photobucket.com/albums/l288/lstude/52inyardsm-1.jpg

lstude
12-03-2006, 01:34 PM
I guess they didn't sell enough of them for the owners to experience fires like some Corvair owners did! :D:D

Leonard Shepherd, editor, The Commanding Leader, Central Virginia Chapter, http://centralvirginiachapter.org/
http://i99.photobucket.com/albums/l288/lstude/Mein64Daytonasm.jpghttp://i99.photobucket.com/albums/l288/lstude/52inyardsm-1.jpg

Randy_G
12-03-2006, 02:29 PM
"It dont get hot enough under the hood of a car now they came up with a camp fire for it." That should have been the slogan to sell this death trap.[:o)]

Randy_G
1959 Lark (project)
Waxahachie, Texas.
www.automotivehistoryonline.com
http://www.automotivehistoryonline.com/sedan4small.jpg

Randy_G
12-03-2006, 02:29 PM
"It dont get hot enough under the hood of a car now they came up with a camp fire for it." That should have been the slogan to sell this death trap.[:o)]

Randy_G
1959 Lark (project)
Waxahachie, Texas.
www.automotivehistoryonline.com
http://www.automotivehistoryonline.com/sedan4small.jpg

mdelapp
12-03-2006, 03:02 PM
I recall there was a gas heater by South Wind that did a great job of instant heat. It was quie popular at the time. I saw one the last week or so on Ebay. ot sure how dangerous they were except it kept my brother's 36 ford warm.

http://i81.photobucket.com/albums/j231/druefer/Stude4.jpg

mdelapp
12-03-2006, 03:02 PM
I recall there was a gas heater by South Wind that did a great job of instant heat. It was quie popular at the time. I saw one the last week or so on Ebay. ot sure how dangerous they were except it kept my brother's 36 ford warm.

http://i81.photobucket.com/albums/j231/druefer/Stude4.jpg

58PackardWagon
12-03-2006, 03:18 PM
Minit-Heat was a gasoline fired system heater for quick warm ups in cold weather. It was AC-2891 in 1958. The picture above is also featured in Turning Wheels August of 1991 page 13.

58 Packard Wagon (Parade Red)
58 Packard Wagon (Park Green)
58 Packard Hardtop
58 Packard Sedan
57 Packard Wagon
62 Daytona
63 Lark Custom 2 Door Sedan R2

58PackardWagon
12-03-2006, 03:18 PM
Minit-Heat was a gasoline fired system heater for quick warm ups in cold weather. It was AC-2891 in 1958. The picture above is also featured in Turning Wheels August of 1991 page 13.

58 Packard Wagon (Parade Red)
58 Packard Wagon (Park Green)
58 Packard Hardtop
58 Packard Sedan
57 Packard Wagon
62 Daytona
63 Lark Custom 2 Door Sedan R2

dclewallen
12-03-2006, 04:45 PM
I saw a setup like this recently on a fellows VW. He liked it and said it worked great and he claimed safely? He also added that they were more popular in europe. I guess Americans were more affraid of flaming gasoline under the hood.

Darryl C. Lewallen Clarkesville, Ga.

dclewallen
12-03-2006, 04:45 PM
I saw a setup like this recently on a fellows VW. He liked it and said it worked great and he claimed safely? He also added that they were more popular in europe. I guess Americans were more affraid of flaming gasoline under the hood.

Darryl C. Lewallen Clarkesville, Ga.

gordr
12-03-2006, 05:12 PM
quote:Originally posted by showbizkid

Notice the copy doesn't claim it improves fuel economy! :D


[img=left]http://members.cox.net/clarknovak/lark.gif[/img=left]

Clark in San Diego
'63 F2/Lark Standard
http://studeblogger.blogspot.com


Actually, Clark, read it again. It says "stops excessive gas consumption during warm-up period."

And I'm prepared to believe that. Remember, the heated water goes through the block, too, so the engine will get to operating temperature faster, so the automatic choke will come off sooner as well. And less raw gas will wash oil off the cylinder walls.

It's just a little gasoline-fired coil stove. Not really an "open" flame, as the fire is inside a combustion chamber with forced air draft through it. I've never run a Minit-Heat, but I've owned several VWs with gas heaters, one of which was a Hupp Perfection, made in USA. Sometimes they will "pop" and blow smoke and flame out the exhaust pipe for an instant. No big deal.

There is a similar unit burning Diesel, manufactured by Webasto, and it is pretty much a necessity on big trucks operating in a Northern climate in winter.

I have a little gas-fired heater sitting on the shelf in my shop, a swap meet find. Don't know the maker's name. It is a six-volt unit. I need something like it in my Diesel Suburban. They are slow to warm up, too.

Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

gordr
12-03-2006, 05:12 PM
quote:Originally posted by showbizkid

Notice the copy doesn't claim it improves fuel economy! :D


[img=left]http://members.cox.net/clarknovak/lark.gif[/img=left]

Clark in San Diego
'63 F2/Lark Standard
http://studeblogger.blogspot.com


Actually, Clark, read it again. It says "stops excessive gas consumption during warm-up period."

And I'm prepared to believe that. Remember, the heated water goes through the block, too, so the engine will get to operating temperature faster, so the automatic choke will come off sooner as well. And less raw gas will wash oil off the cylinder walls.

It's just a little gasoline-fired coil stove. Not really an "open" flame, as the fire is inside a combustion chamber with forced air draft through it. I've never run a Minit-Heat, but I've owned several VWs with gas heaters, one of which was a Hupp Perfection, made in USA. Sometimes they will "pop" and blow smoke and flame out the exhaust pipe for an instant. No big deal.

There is a similar unit burning Diesel, manufactured by Webasto, and it is pretty much a necessity on big trucks operating in a Northern climate in winter.

I have a little gas-fired heater sitting on the shelf in my shop, a swap meet find. Don't know the maker's name. It is a six-volt unit. I need something like it in my Diesel Suburban. They are slow to warm up, too.

Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

Transtar56
12-03-2006, 08:43 PM
We had one of the VW heaters in our ice fishing shsck. It warmed theplace really well.
Had a heavy winter rain and quick thaw and I lost my shack and heater too.

Transtar56
12-03-2006, 08:43 PM
We had one of the VW heaters in our ice fishing shsck. It warmed theplace really well.
Had a heavy winter rain and quick thaw and I lost my shack and heater too.

ST2DE5
12-03-2006, 08:54 PM
In 1959 I lived in Colorado Springs, Co. And had a 48 Packard with the South Wind heater and it sure was nice on cold mornings going to work. You only used it for a few miles and then the water was hot enough to turn on the heater. Good for defrosting to.

ST2DE5
12-03-2006, 08:54 PM
In 1959 I lived in Colorado Springs, Co. And had a 48 Packard with the South Wind heater and it sure was nice on cold mornings going to work. You only used it for a few miles and then the water was hot enough to turn on the heater. Good for defrosting to.

showbizkid
12-03-2006, 09:08 PM
quote:Actually, Clark, read it again. It says "stops excessive gas consumption during warm-up period."


Oh yeah - I should've thought of that before I commenced to being glib [:I] Being a California boy all my life, I have no experience with really cold weather. My jaw hit the floor recently when a lady from Toronto told me that she has to warm her car up for 20 minutes every morning before she drives [:0]


[img=left]http://members.cox.net/clarknovak/lark.gif[/img=left]

Clark in San Diego
'63 F2/Lark Standard
http://studeblogger.blogspot.com

showbizkid
12-03-2006, 09:08 PM
quote:Actually, Clark, read it again. It says "stops excessive gas consumption during warm-up period."


Oh yeah - I should've thought of that before I commenced to being glib [:I] Being a California boy all my life, I have no experience with really cold weather. My jaw hit the floor recently when a lady from Toronto told me that she has to warm her car up for 20 minutes every morning before she drives [:0]


[img=left]http://members.cox.net/clarknovak/lark.gif[/img=left]

Clark in San Diego
'63 F2/Lark Standard
http://studeblogger.blogspot.com

Transtar56
12-03-2006, 09:56 PM
" a lady from Toronto told me that she has to warm her car up for 20 minutes every morning before she drives"

Thats nuts. No matter how cold it is you don't need to wait that long,give it a minute or two,then drive carefully untill your rig warms up.
You can do a lot of damage just hitting large holes and bumps hard with a frozen car.
I used to start my 318 powered plymouth Fury routinely at -40, in nothern Ontario.
You know its cold when the seat feels like a cement bench.

Transtar56
12-03-2006, 09:56 PM
" a lady from Toronto told me that she has to warm her car up for 20 minutes every morning before she drives"

Thats nuts. No matter how cold it is you don't need to wait that long,give it a minute or two,then drive carefully untill your rig warms up.
You can do a lot of damage just hitting large holes and bumps hard with a frozen car.
I used to start my 318 powered plymouth Fury routinely at -40, in nothern Ontario.
You know its cold when the seat feels like a cement bench.

gordr
12-04-2006, 01:03 AM
quote:Originally posted by Transtar56

" a lady from Toronto told me that she has to warm her car up for 20 minutes every morning before she drives"

Thats nuts. No matter how cold it is you don't need to wait that long,give it a minute or two,then drive carefully untill your rig warms up.
You can do a lot of damage just hitting large holes and bumps hard with a frozen car.
I used to start my 318 powered plymouth Fury routinely at -40, in nothern Ontario.
You know its cold when the seat feels like a cement bench.


Yep, agree 100%, Robert. Twenty minutes is a totally excessive warmup period, leastwise as far as the needs of the engine are concerned. Get the oil and coolant circulating, and off the fastest step on the choke cam, and you are good to go, driving gently at first.

That lady is is warming her car up 20 minutes so she can go drive off in a car with warm interior and defrosted windows. She is exactly the kind of person that Minit-Heat was intended for.:D Nowadays, an electric in-car warmer and/or heated seats are the easiest option for personal comfort in the nasty cold weather.

Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

gordr
12-04-2006, 01:03 AM
quote:Originally posted by Transtar56

" a lady from Toronto told me that she has to warm her car up for 20 minutes every morning before she drives"

Thats nuts. No matter how cold it is you don't need to wait that long,give it a minute or two,then drive carefully untill your rig warms up.
You can do a lot of damage just hitting large holes and bumps hard with a frozen car.
I used to start my 318 powered plymouth Fury routinely at -40, in nothern Ontario.
You know its cold when the seat feels like a cement bench.


Yep, agree 100%, Robert. Twenty minutes is a totally excessive warmup period, leastwise as far as the needs of the engine are concerned. Get the oil and coolant circulating, and off the fastest step on the choke cam, and you are good to go, driving gently at first.

That lady is is warming her car up 20 minutes so she can go drive off in a car with warm interior and defrosted windows. She is exactly the kind of person that Minit-Heat was intended for.:D Nowadays, an electric in-car warmer and/or heated seats are the easiest option for personal comfort in the nasty cold weather.

Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

bob40
12-04-2006, 04:05 PM
All those who can remember taking off in whatever minus degree weather and enjoying square tires and a manual trans stuck in first gear until the grease warmed up raise your hand.

Bob-40 below

bob40
12-04-2006, 04:05 PM
All those who can remember taking off in whatever minus degree weather and enjoying square tires and a manual trans stuck in first gear until the grease warmed up raise your hand.

Bob-40 below

John Kirchhoff
12-04-2006, 05:16 PM
The fastest way to warm a car up is to get it on the road. The faster you run gas through them, the faster they warm up. My Dodge truck isn't the quickest thing to warm up, but regardless of how cold it is, take off with a 12,000 pound load (it ain't fast!) and the water's up to operating temperature within a half mile. I've never been one to let a car warm up for long periods of time and cold starts haven't seemed to hurt my 265,000 mile Dodge Caravan or 204,000 mile Ford Tempo.

John Kirchhoff
12-04-2006, 05:16 PM
The fastest way to warm a car up is to get it on the road. The faster you run gas through them, the faster they warm up. My Dodge truck isn't the quickest thing to warm up, but regardless of how cold it is, take off with a 12,000 pound load (it ain't fast!) and the water's up to operating temperature within a half mile. I've never been one to let a car warm up for long periods of time and cold starts haven't seemed to hurt my 265,000 mile Dodge Caravan or 204,000 mile Ford Tempo.

gordr
12-05-2006, 01:27 AM
quote:Originally posted by bob40

All those who can remember taking off in whatever minus degree weather and enjoying square tires and a manual trans stuck in first gear until the grease warmed up raise your hand.

Bob-40 below


Gee, like maybe two weeks ago, when I started my 3 ton grain truck and moved it into the shop to use it as a scaffold to hang my lights?

I can't vouch for the tires being square, but the tranny was some stiff.:D

Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

gordr
12-05-2006, 01:27 AM
quote:Originally posted by bob40

All those who can remember taking off in whatever minus degree weather and enjoying square tires and a manual trans stuck in first gear until the grease warmed up raise your hand.

Bob-40 below


Gee, like maybe two weeks ago, when I started my 3 ton grain truck and moved it into the shop to use it as a scaffold to hang my lights?

I can't vouch for the tires being square, but the tranny was some stiff.:D

Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands