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DilloCrafter
11-28-2006, 07:47 PM
I need some experienced eyes to have a look at how I've placed the oil pressure gauge line and the partial flow filter line on my rebuilt motor. The original engine that's in the truck now does not have an oil filter, so the pressure gauge line is coming off of the oil pump. But the manual seems to indicate that entire rail is carrying oil at pressure, or so it looks to me.

How about it? Did I get it right, or what can I do if it's wrong?

Thanks,
Paul
http://rocketdillo.com/studebaker/misc/images/motor-WithOilLines.jpg

http://rocketdillo.com/studebaker/misc/images/Avacar-hcsdc.gif[/img=left]DilloCrafter

1955 1/2 Ton Pickup
[i]The Red-Headed Amazon
Deep in the heart of Texas

gecoe
11-28-2006, 08:06 PM
The oil pressure line is correct. The oil filter line typically came off the oil journal forward of the fuel pump. However, as you stated, the entire oil journal is pressurized so any of the ports will work. I haven't seen the filter input taken off the pump housing before but that proves nothing. It could have been done.

More important than the oil journal port used is the fact that the line has to be restricted. If the fitting you used is not restricted you will be pumping most of the oil to the filter and very little will get to the important places. After all the work on this engine you definately don't want that.

Gerry
NE Colorado

garyash
11-28-2006, 10:46 PM
Paul: Gerry's right about the orifice. They look like this:
http://www.studegarage.com/images/orifice2.jpg
You should be able to find one in the brass fittings bins at your FLAPS. The originals may have had 0.045" diameter orifices, but an 0.060" hole is OK, too. It will give you about 1 quart/minute through the filter at 30 psig when the oil is hot, so you won't reduce the oil pressure to the bearings.

My M5 has the oil pressure tap from the top of the oil pump and the filter tap just forward of the oil pump.

Are those lines copper? If so, I'd recommend replacing them with steel because the copper will eventually work harden from vibration and crack.

[img=left]http://www.studegarage.com/images/gary_ash_m5_sm.jpg[/img=left] Gary Ash
Dartmouth, Mass.
'48 M5
'65 Wagonaire Commander
'63 Wagonaire Standard
web site at http://www.studegarage.com

DilloCrafter
11-29-2006, 01:20 AM
Thanks for the advice, Gerry and Gary!

I'll have to look at the hole in the fitting (I suppose the right angled one in the top of the oil pump) that starts the line to the oil filter. For the pressure line, I bought a NPT compression fitting to go into the block, and the female part of it accepts "tube" thread, which is what is on that line.

And yes, they are copper lines. Looks like I have more parts to buy and more fabricating to do. You guys are saving me much grief later, and I do appreciate that.

http://rocketdillo.com/studebaker/misc/images/Avacar-hcsdc.gif[/img=left]DilloCrafter

1955 1/2 Ton Pickup
[i]The Red-Headed Amazon
Deep in the heart of Texas

Roscomacaw
11-29-2006, 01:21 AM
I think you could silver solder it too. And then drill as Gerry did.:D

Miscreant adrift in
the BerStuda Triangle!!

1957 Transtar 1/2ton
1960 Larkvertible V8
1958 Provincial wagon
1953 Commander coupe

gecoe
11-29-2006, 01:34 AM
I had no luck finding a restricted fitting a while back and resorted to brazing shut the hole in a standard fitting and drilling it with a 1/16" (.0625") bit. If you're careful with the heat the brazing rod will flow just before the fitting does.

Gerry
NE Colorado

starlightchamp
11-29-2006, 04:36 PM
I have tried many auto and hydraulic stores trying to find that restricitor fitting with
no luck. SI sent me a replacement oil line that runs from block to the Filter, but it had no
restiction. I'm going to remove it and plug the block hole because I worry the front
bearings are not getting enough oil.
Anyone have one of these fittings or know a source ??
...Dick Curtis

1950 Champion Starlight
1963 Hawk GT
Santa Barbara
CA

gecoe
11-29-2006, 07:43 PM
They're readily available at your flaps. They just have to be modified as I mentioned above. After reading Mr. Biggs' post I think I'd do it his way next time but either way it's a few min. work.

Gerry
NE Colorado

starlightchamp
11-29-2006, 08:04 PM
Thank you all. I'm brazing challenged but good at siver solder (RC model plane landing gear),
so will try that. Many kudo's to Mr. Mr. Biggs for his 5000++ help !!
...Dick Curtis

1950 Champion Starlight
1963 Hawk GT
Santa Barbara
CA

DilloCrafter
11-29-2006, 10:10 PM
quote:Originally posted by DilloCrafter
I'll have to look at the hole in the fitting (I suppose the right angled one in the top of the oil pump) that starts the line to the oil filter.
Good news... I unscrewed the right angle fitting from the top of the oil pump housing, and it has a 1/16" hole in it - restrictor! Now I don't have to search for or modify one.

And I am going to get steel lines tomorrow, to replace the old copper lines. Hmmm, should I get those lines chrome plated?

http://rocketdillo.com/studebaker/misc/images/Avacar-hcsdc.gif[/img=left]DilloCrafter

1955 1/2 Ton Pickup
[i]The Red-Headed Amazon
Deep in the heart of Texas

CHAMP
11-30-2006, 06:54 AM
The chrome oil lines is one of those little details that would put your engine over the top!!! I like it!!!:)

GARY H 2DR.SEDAN 48 STUDEBAKER CHAMPION NORTHEAST MD.

CHAMP
11-30-2006, 06:58 AM
One more thing. You could polish the steel lines and spray with clearcoat and it would look almost as good as chrome!:)

GARY H 2DR.SEDAN 48 STUDEBAKER CHAMPION NORTHEAST MD.

garyash
11-30-2006, 10:33 AM
You can also use stainless steel hydraulic tubing for the lines. To dress them up, you can buff them. To get them really shiny, get them electropolished after buffing - they'll be as bright as chrome and a lot cheaper than chrome plating. You probably need to get them electropolished before you put the nuts on and double-flare the ends, because brass won't survive the acid in the electropolish tank. Stainless tube is more difficult to make flares in, so try a test flare before you spend a lot of time at this. You might get pre-polished tubing from a specialty stainless steel supplier, but your FLAPS should have the tubing. Also look here: http://www.classictube.com

I'm not sure about polishing regular steel lines. As I remember, steel hydraulic line is "terne coated", meaning it has thin coating of lead on it to prevent corrosion. If you polish the lead off and get a pinhole or scratch in a clear overcoat, it may rust quickly. On the other hand, this is an oil line in a Studebaker, so oil leaks from other places on the engine will prevent rust anyway!

Gary Ash

curt
11-30-2006, 11:46 AM
Sterv Allen had some used restricted 90 degree futtings last fall, 2005.