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garyash
11-26-2006, 06:37 PM
The 1959 Lark with the Porsche engine, as built by Curtis-Wright Corporation in 1959, is on its way to the Studebaker National Museum. I had the privilege of picking it up from the donors today and storing it in the Studegarage at my house until it can be picked up. The car is little changed from when it was put together in 1959, but needs a little paint and cosmetics and new brake lines to put it 100%. The 1500 cc engine and transaxle fit neatly in the trunk, the floor humps were removed to show the benefits of a rear engine car, and the gas tank is up front. The trunk lid sits up 3 or 4 inches to add a little air cooling and some bracing was added to the rear window area because the floors and frame had to be cut away a good bit. By next summer for the International meet in South bend, it ought to be on display (or at least in visible storage) at the museum.
http://www.studegarage.com/images/porschelark/porschelark_frontqtr.jpg
The Silver Mist '59 Lark with my '63 Wagonaire and the mannequin who watches the garage.

http://www.studegarage.com/images/porschelark/porschelark_rearqtr.jpg
The rear deck lid and rear quarter bracing around the window.

http://www.studegarage.com/images/porschelark/porschelark_engine_left.jpg
1952 Porsche engine - 1500 cc, 70 hp

http://www.studegarage.com/images/porschelark/porschelark_underhood.jpg
Under the hood - spare tire, battery, and gas tank

http://www.studegarage.com/images/porschelark/porschelark_interior_left.jpg
Interior with Porsche floor shift and flat floors

http://www.studegarage.com/images/porschelark/porschelark_in_studegarage.jpg
The PorscheLark parked between two Wagonaires, and in front of the M5 trailer with Caravan top.


[img=left]http://www.studegarage.com/images/gary_ash_m5_sm.jpg[/img=left] Gary Ash
Dartmouth, Mass.
'48 M5
'65 Wagonaire Commander
'63 Wagonaire Standard
web site at http://www.studegarage.com

mbstude
11-26-2006, 06:50 PM
I've heard of people putting Porsche motors in Volkswagens, but...
I saw a pretty Karmen Ghia not long ago with Porsche running gear.

How does it drive? ;)



_____________________________________

Matthew Burnette
Hazlehurst, Georgia
'59 Scotsman PU
'63 Daytona HT

http://i81.photobucket.com/albums/j209/mbstude/side_body_avatar.jpg

http://mbstudebaker.blogspot.com/
http://thestudillac.blogspot.com/

mbstude
11-26-2006, 06:50 PM
I've heard of people putting Porsche motors in Volkswagens, but...
I saw a pretty Karmen Ghia not long ago with Porsche running gear.

How does it drive? ;)



_____________________________________

Matthew Burnette
Hazlehurst, Georgia
'59 Scotsman PU
'63 Daytona HT

http://i81.photobucket.com/albums/j209/mbstude/side_body_avatar.jpg

http://mbstudebaker.blogspot.com/
http://thestudillac.blogspot.com/

r1lark
11-26-2006, 06:57 PM
Great pics! Great to hear the car is going to the Museum.

But I don't understand......your post on 11/24 on the 'porche powered 60 lark' thread said that you had last talked to the owner a couple of years ago. Now it is being donated to the Museum, and is stored temporarily in your garage. What did I miss? Relate the whole story, inquiring minds want to know how this came about all of a sudden!

Paul

Visit The Studebaker Skytop Registry website at: http://hometown.aol.com/r1skytop/myhomepage/index.html

r1lark
11-26-2006, 06:57 PM
Great pics! Great to hear the car is going to the Museum.

But I don't understand......your post on 11/24 on the 'porche powered 60 lark' thread said that you had last talked to the owner a couple of years ago. Now it is being donated to the Museum, and is stored temporarily in your garage. What did I miss? Relate the whole story, inquiring minds want to know how this came about all of a sudden!

Paul

Visit The Studebaker Skytop Registry website at: http://hometown.aol.com/r1skytop/myhomepage/index.html

monomaniac
11-26-2006, 08:16 PM
Gary, I certainly hope you are preparing some type of report for Turning Wheels. ???

monomaniac
11-26-2006, 08:16 PM
Gary, I certainly hope you are preparing some type of report for Turning Wheels. ???

garyash
11-26-2006, 08:41 PM
The rest of the story: Well, I was amazed a week or so ago when the subject of this car got posted. Negotiations between the museum and donor had been going on for just a little while, had to move quickly, and I happened to get a call from the museum because they knew me - but not because they knew of my past interest in the car. Skip's questions about the car set a few of us "a-tingling", seeing someone not previously involved bringing the car into the bright light. I wasn't in a position to spell out the whole story last week, I just volunteered to help the donor and the museum to solve some minor technical issues about transport and temporary storage. I did call Skip and found out he had driven down that road and seen the car a couple of months ago. Quite naturally, he wanted to know more details about it and just happened to post the question last week.

As it turned out, the very generous donor carried through with the plans. I rented a U-Haul car hauler trailer today and drove the 125 miles each way to get it so that it would be out of winter weather until complete transportation arrangements could be made to get it to South Bend. Since the brakes don't work and it has no battery, it can't be driven just now. It also has no parking brake - hasn't had one since Curtis-Wright removed the original rear axle. That made it a little tricky to get on and off the trailer, but we managed with my little come-along winch and my adventurous wife steering and using the clutch and 1st gear as a brake against the non-operating engine. [The engine does run when a battery is installed.] Sometime in the next couple of weeks, a professional transport company will take it to the museum. The museum will eventually display all of the details and history.

Yes, I had wanted to buy this car at one point in the past, but it really does belong in the Studebaker National Museum as an interesting side light of the Studebaker - Curtis Wright relationship and as a unique example of a rear-engined Studebaker. I've got enough projects going as it is. I'm told that the use of the VW microbus gear reduction units on the rear wheels limits top speed to 55-60 mph and putting 1500 cc of engine in a 3000 lb car makes it slow off the line. That said, the previous owner claims to have driven it all over New England during the last 30 years or so. The car really is a mind-bender!

Gary Ash
Dartmouth, MA

garyash
11-26-2006, 08:41 PM
The rest of the story: Well, I was amazed a week or so ago when the subject of this car got posted. Negotiations between the museum and donor had been going on for just a little while, had to move quickly, and I happened to get a call from the museum because they knew me - but not because they knew of my past interest in the car. Skip's questions about the car set a few of us "a-tingling", seeing someone not previously involved bringing the car into the bright light. I wasn't in a position to spell out the whole story last week, I just volunteered to help the donor and the museum to solve some minor technical issues about transport and temporary storage. I did call Skip and found out he had driven down that road and seen the car a couple of months ago. Quite naturally, he wanted to know more details about it and just happened to post the question last week.

As it turned out, the very generous donor carried through with the plans. I rented a U-Haul car hauler trailer today and drove the 125 miles each way to get it so that it would be out of winter weather until complete transportation arrangements could be made to get it to South Bend. Since the brakes don't work and it has no battery, it can't be driven just now. It also has no parking brake - hasn't had one since Curtis-Wright removed the original rear axle. That made it a little tricky to get on and off the trailer, but we managed with my little come-along winch and my adventurous wife steering and using the clutch and 1st gear as a brake against the non-operating engine. [The engine does run when a battery is installed.] Sometime in the next couple of weeks, a professional transport company will take it to the museum. The museum will eventually display all of the details and history.

Yes, I had wanted to buy this car at one point in the past, but it really does belong in the Studebaker National Museum as an interesting side light of the Studebaker - Curtis Wright relationship and as a unique example of a rear-engined Studebaker. I've got enough projects going as it is. I'm told that the use of the VW microbus gear reduction units on the rear wheels limits top speed to 55-60 mph and putting 1500 cc of engine in a 3000 lb car makes it slow off the line. That said, the previous owner claims to have driven it all over New England during the last 30 years or so. The car really is a mind-bender!

Gary Ash
Dartmouth, MA

StudeDave57
11-26-2006, 08:43 PM
Looks like a front end collision would be something you only do once!!! :) [:o)] ;) [:0]

StudeDave [8D]
V/P San Diego County SDC
San Diego, Ca

'54 Commander 4dr 'Ruby'
'57 Parkview (it's a 2dr wagon...) 'Betsy'
'57 Commander 2dr 'Baby'
'57 Champion 2dr 'Jewel'
'58 Packard sedan 'Cleo'
'65 Cruiser 'Sweet Pea'

StudeDave57
11-26-2006, 08:43 PM
Looks like a front end collision would be something you only do once!!! :) [:o)] ;) [:0]

StudeDave [8D]
V/P San Diego County SDC
San Diego, Ca

'54 Commander 4dr 'Ruby'
'57 Parkview (it's a 2dr wagon...) 'Betsy'
'57 Commander 2dr 'Baby'
'57 Champion 2dr 'Jewel'
'58 Packard sedan 'Cleo'
'65 Cruiser 'Sweet Pea'

Thomas63R2
11-26-2006, 09:20 PM
Now that is interesting. It is amazing that unusual cars can fly under the radar for so long - and then like magic they come to light.

Gary, any idea why that weighs more than a standard Lark?

Thomas

New Stude guy! Long time hot rodder
'63 Avanti R2 4 speed with interesting plans

Thomas63R2
11-26-2006, 09:20 PM
Now that is interesting. It is amazing that unusual cars can fly under the radar for so long - and then like magic they come to light.

Gary, any idea why that weighs more than a standard Lark?

Thomas

New Stude guy! Long time hot rodder
'63 Avanti R2 4 speed with interesting plans

mbstude
11-27-2006, 07:51 AM
Is the trunk lid closed in this position? Or does it go down more?

http://www.studegarage.com/images/porschelark/porschelark_rearqtr.jpg

_____________________________________

Matthew Burnette
Hazlehurst, Georgia
'59 Scotsman PU
'63 Daytona HT

http://i81.photobucket.com/albums/j209/mbstude/side_body_avatar.jpg

http://mbstudebaker.blogspot.com/
http://thestudillac.blogspot.com/

mbstude
11-27-2006, 07:51 AM
Is the trunk lid closed in this position? Or does it go down more?

http://www.studegarage.com/images/porschelark/porschelark_rearqtr.jpg

_____________________________________

Matthew Burnette
Hazlehurst, Georgia
'59 Scotsman PU
'63 Daytona HT

http://i81.photobucket.com/albums/j209/mbstude/side_body_avatar.jpg

http://mbstudebaker.blogspot.com/
http://thestudillac.blogspot.com/

Roscomacaw
11-27-2006, 10:02 AM
Thanks for sharing, Gary!:D Pretty danged cool that something like this survived - as well as the oft-discussed diesel Lark that's still around!

OK - now when is a front wheel drive prototype gonna surface??? Or how about a dark and cobwebbed old garage in South Bend yielding a '65 Packard!!![:0][:0][:0]

BTW, Gary. You CAN NOT let this car set in your garage without getting some photos of the underpinnings for us to gawk at!!![}:)]

Miscreant adrift in
the BerStuda Triangle!!

1957 Transtar 1/2ton
1960 Larkvertible V8
1958 Provincial wagon
1953 Commander coupe

Roscomacaw
11-27-2006, 10:02 AM
Thanks for sharing, Gary!:D Pretty danged cool that something like this survived - as well as the oft-discussed diesel Lark that's still around!

OK - now when is a front wheel drive prototype gonna surface??? Or how about a dark and cobwebbed old garage in South Bend yielding a '65 Packard!!![:0][:0][:0]

BTW, Gary. You CAN NOT let this car set in your garage without getting some photos of the underpinnings for us to gawk at!!![}:)]

Miscreant adrift in
the BerStuda Triangle!!

1957 Transtar 1/2ton
1960 Larkvertible V8
1958 Provincial wagon
1953 Commander coupe

Dick Steinkamp
11-27-2006, 10:29 AM
Pretty special, Gary!! [:p][8D]

I wonder why Curtis-Wright used a 7 year old Porsche engine? By 1959 Porsche was using a 1600 CC engine, up to 102 HP. 50% more HP would have helped a lot I would guess.


http://static.flickr.com/100/301465853_2dbe07b7c6_m.jpg
Dick Steinkamp
Bellingham, WA

Dick Steinkamp
11-27-2006, 10:29 AM
Pretty special, Gary!! [:p][8D]

I wonder why Curtis-Wright used a 7 year old Porsche engine? By 1959 Porsche was using a 1600 CC engine, up to 102 HP. 50% more HP would have helped a lot I would guess.


http://static.flickr.com/100/301465853_2dbe07b7c6_m.jpg
Dick Steinkamp
Bellingham, WA

garyash
11-27-2006, 06:12 PM
Matthew: the deck lid sits up because the previous owner found that engine overheated. Appparently, the small vent in the middle of the deck lid is not enough of an air inlet. A couple of aluminum blocks were added between the hinges and lid to raise the lid up. A short chain with spring-loaded hook clips to the normal latch. No new holes were drilled, so the lid could go back down for display purposes, but the car needs more cooling some how if it's to be driven.

I'm trying to figure out how to get some good under-the-car photos to show the engine, transaxle, frame modifications, and gear reduction boxes. As soon as I have some more good pictures, I'll post them. Basically, you could look under any VW bug or bus of the mid '50s and see what's there, because I think they put the Porsche stuff in whole. Of course, only the bus and transporter trucks had gear reduction boxes at each rear wheel.

As for Dick's question of "why not a better/newer Porsche engine?", that, too, is a bit of a mystery. While the Porsche 1600 Carrera engine may have had 102 hp in 1959, it was the top of the line and very expensive in those days. Curtis-Wright bought a cheaper rebuilt 1500 engine. The 1600 Normal was 75 hp as I remember and Super engines had about 90 hp. I had a 1959 Porsche 356B with the 1600 Super engine back in 1965 - after I sold my '53 Commander Starliner [Gary, you dummy!]. See http://www.studegarage.com/othercar.htm for pics of the Porsche and others. When my 1600 Super engine blew, the estimate to rebuild it was well over $3000 in 1965, far beyond my means as a college student, so I had a used 1600 Normal engine put in. The Super and Carrera engines had one-piece rods and multipiece crankshafts that required heating some parts while freezing others in liquid nitrogen to assemble the lower end. Remember, though, that this '59 Lark was slated to receive a Wan_kel rotary engine. The Curtis-Wright project got cancelled before that happened. Maybe Curtis-Wright couldn't get a rotary engine that was reliable enough and had adequate hp in those days. It was a long time before good rotary engines were in production. They may have abandoned the project because the Lark, as built, was a slow dog.

I'm guessing a lot about the car weight. I assume that the finished car weighed several hundred pounds less than the original car. It had come with Flight-O-Matic (a correction to my earlier statement about a 3-speed manual). A Champ 6, Flight-O-Matic, leaf springs, and Dana 27 axle has got to weigh twice what the Porsche assembly with torsion bars weighs, say 1100 lbs vs. 550 lbs. Anyone got real data? What did a standard Lark 2-dr sedan weigh?


[img=left]http://www.studegarage.com/images/gary_ash_m5_sm.jpg[/img=left] Gary Ash
Dartmouth, Mass.
'48 M5
'65 Wagonaire Commander
'63 Wagonaire Standard
web site at http://www.studegarage.com

garyash
11-27-2006, 06:12 PM
Matthew: the deck lid sits up because the previous owner found that engine overheated. Appparently, the small vent in the middle of the deck lid is not enough of an air inlet. A couple of aluminum blocks were added between the hinges and lid to raise the lid up. A short chain with spring-loaded hook clips to the normal latch. No new holes were drilled, so the lid could go back down for display purposes, but the car needs more cooling some how if it's to be driven.

I'm trying to figure out how to get some good under-the-car photos to show the engine, transaxle, frame modifications, and gear reduction boxes. As soon as I have some more good pictures, I'll post them. Basically, you could look under any VW bug or bus of the mid '50s and see what's there, because I think they put the Porsche stuff in whole. Of course, only the bus and transporter trucks had gear reduction boxes at each rear wheel.

As for Dick's question of "why not a better/newer Porsche engine?", that, too, is a bit of a mystery. While the Porsche 1600 Carrera engine may have had 102 hp in 1959, it was the top of the line and very expensive in those days. Curtis-Wright bought a cheaper rebuilt 1500 engine. The 1600 Normal was 75 hp as I remember and Super engines had about 90 hp. I had a 1959 Porsche 356B with the 1600 Super engine back in 1965 - after I sold my '53 Commander Starliner [Gary, you dummy!]. See http://www.studegarage.com/othercar.htm for pics of the Porsche and others. When my 1600 Super engine blew, the estimate to rebuild it was well over $3000 in 1965, far beyond my means as a college student, so I had a used 1600 Normal engine put in. The Super and Carrera engines had one-piece rods and multipiece crankshafts that required heating some parts while freezing others in liquid nitrogen to assemble the lower end. Remember, though, that this '59 Lark was slated to receive a Wan_kel rotary engine. The Curtis-Wright project got cancelled before that happened. Maybe Curtis-Wright couldn't get a rotary engine that was reliable enough and had adequate hp in those days. It was a long time before good rotary engines were in production. They may have abandoned the project because the Lark, as built, was a slow dog.

I'm guessing a lot about the car weight. I assume that the finished car weighed several hundred pounds less than the original car. It had come with Flight-O-Matic (a correction to my earlier statement about a 3-speed manual). A Champ 6, Flight-O-Matic, leaf springs, and Dana 27 axle has got to weigh twice what the Porsche assembly with torsion bars weighs, say 1100 lbs vs. 550 lbs. Anyone got real data? What did a standard Lark 2-dr sedan weigh?


[img=left]http://www.studegarage.com/images/gary_ash_m5_sm.jpg[/img=left] Gary Ash
Dartmouth, Mass.
'48 M5
'65 Wagonaire Commander
'63 Wagonaire Standard
web site at http://www.studegarage.com

Randy_G
11-27-2006, 06:34 PM
a Standard 1959 Lark VI 2dr "59S-F4" sedan just like the porsche lark and the same one sitting at my storage lot awaiting the turn of the new year, weighs #2577. glad I could help. :D

Randy_G
1959 Lark (project)
www.automotivehistoryonline.com
http://www.automotivehistoryonline.com/sedan4small.jpg

Randy_G
11-27-2006, 06:34 PM
a Standard 1959 Lark VI 2dr "59S-F4" sedan just like the porsche lark and the same one sitting at my storage lot awaiting the turn of the new year, weighs #2577. glad I could help. :D

Randy_G
1959 Lark (project)
www.automotivehistoryonline.com
http://www.automotivehistoryonline.com/sedan4small.jpg

Dick Steinkamp
11-27-2006, 06:38 PM
quote:Originally posted by garyash

As for Dick's question of "why not a better/newer Porsche engine?", that, too, is a bit of a mystery. While the Porsche 1600 Carrera engine may have had 102 hp in 1959, it was the top of the line and very expensive in those days.


Actually, the Super 90 was the 102 HP (SAE) engine I was refering to (90 DIN HP). It was just a step up from the Super...same overhead valve configuration. The same engine I had in my '67 912. The 4 cam Carrera engine was indeed super rare and super expensive. It was actually 2 liters and produced about 130 HP. It was essentially a "race only" engine and wouldn't do too well in a Lark daily driver.

http://static.flickr.com/100/301465853_2dbe07b7c6_m.jpg
Dick Steinkamp
Bellingham, WA

Dick Steinkamp
11-27-2006, 06:38 PM
quote:Originally posted by garyash

As for Dick's question of "why not a better/newer Porsche engine?", that, too, is a bit of a mystery. While the Porsche 1600 Carrera engine may have had 102 hp in 1959, it was the top of the line and very expensive in those days.


Actually, the Super 90 was the 102 HP (SAE) engine I was refering to (90 DIN HP). It was just a step up from the Super...same overhead valve configuration. The same engine I had in my '67 912. The 4 cam Carrera engine was indeed super rare and super expensive. It was actually 2 liters and produced about 130 HP. It was essentially a "race only" engine and wouldn't do too well in a Lark daily driver.

http://static.flickr.com/100/301465853_2dbe07b7c6_m.jpg
Dick Steinkamp
Bellingham, WA

Roscomacaw
11-27-2006, 06:47 PM
No doubt about it, Studebaker had some cool ideas up their sleeves right up until the end. Too bad this Wright Stuff(ing) didn't bear fruit. Imagine Stude's aborted flat four (or expanded to a six!) tucked in there. Or how about a two-seater with their flat engine amidships!???
Too little cash flow to do much of any of this.[V]

Miscreant adrift in
the BerStuda Triangle!!

1957 Transtar 1/2ton
1960 Larkvertible V8
1958 Provincial wagon
1953 Commander coupe

Roscomacaw
11-27-2006, 06:47 PM
No doubt about it, Studebaker had some cool ideas up their sleeves right up until the end. Too bad this Wright Stuff(ing) didn't bear fruit. Imagine Stude's aborted flat four (or expanded to a six!) tucked in there. Or how about a two-seater with their flat engine amidships!???
Too little cash flow to do much of any of this.[V]

Miscreant adrift in
the BerStuda Triangle!!

1957 Transtar 1/2ton
1960 Larkvertible V8
1958 Provincial wagon
1953 Commander coupe

VWandSTUDEBAKER
11-28-2006, 08:42 PM
[8D] I have all the parts to duplicate it. Just need good pictures and info. Got a 67 bus tranny and vw engine in the garge needing a home [:p]

David

1963 R2 Super Lark
1963 Lark HT
1951 Champion 2dr sedan
1957 Broadmoore wagon
1957 Broadmoore wagon
1958 Provincial wagon (maybe for sale)
1966 Daytona 2dr sedan
1951 1 1/2 ton truck
and others, plus various air cooled VW's
1966 Cadillac Coupe DeVille 2dr HT (for sale or trade)
1964 Cadillac Camper (for sale or trade)

http://s18.photobucket.com/albums/b147/VWandSTUDEBAKER/Cars/?action=view&current=MyOwnCarShow70s.jpg&refPage=&imgAnch=imgAnch1

VWandSTUDEBAKER
11-28-2006, 08:42 PM
[8D] I have all the parts to duplicate it. Just need good pictures and info. Got a 67 bus tranny and vw engine in the garge needing a home [:p]

David

1963 R2 Super Lark
1963 Lark HT
1951 Champion 2dr sedan
1957 Broadmoore wagon
1957 Broadmoore wagon
1958 Provincial wagon (maybe for sale)
1966 Daytona 2dr sedan
1951 1 1/2 ton truck
and others, plus various air cooled VW's
1966 Cadillac Coupe DeVille 2dr HT (for sale or trade)
1964 Cadillac Camper (for sale or trade)

http://s18.photobucket.com/albums/b147/VWandSTUDEBAKER/Cars/?action=view&current=MyOwnCarShow70s.jpg&refPage=&imgAnch=imgAnch1

gordr
11-28-2006, 11:28 PM
A Porsche-powered Lark? Would that be a Plark?

It's certainly unique, although I must say it looks like a pretty crude conversion, considering its provenance. Curtiss-Wright clearly didn't break the piggy bank on this one.

I wonder if it takes a six-volt battery? I know VW used six volt electrics right through 1966. I don't know if Porsche followed suit, but I'd be willing to wager that they were using six volt batteries in '52.

I remember putting a VW transporter transaxle into a dune buggy I had. You had to flop the ring gear in the transaxle in order to accomplish this job.

It is very good news to see this one has been donated to the museum.

Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

gordr
11-28-2006, 11:28 PM
A Porsche-powered Lark? Would that be a Plark?

It's certainly unique, although I must say it looks like a pretty crude conversion, considering its provenance. Curtiss-Wright clearly didn't break the piggy bank on this one.

I wonder if it takes a six-volt battery? I know VW used six volt electrics right through 1966. I don't know if Porsche followed suit, but I'd be willing to wager that they were using six volt batteries in '52.

I remember putting a VW transporter transaxle into a dune buggy I had. You had to flop the ring gear in the transaxle in order to accomplish this job.

It is very good news to see this one has been donated to the museum.

Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

Guido
11-29-2006, 06:17 AM
quote:Originally posted by gordr

A Porsche-powered Lark? Would that be a Plark?
I think either a Pork or a Park. :D

http://thumb14.webshots.net/t/53/453/1/21/36/2964121360097493054pVJTFL_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/57/757/2/88/4/2023288040097493054SEKowB_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/18/19/8/37/21/2050837210097493054IYBJJL_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/59/559/1/43/57/2876143570097493054jKVhDw_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/22/22/0/2/68/2589002680097493054ftBuBw_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/28/28/8/30/30/2075830300097493054aSSlFv_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/59/459/2/23/86/2067223860097493054YoeGMx_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/28/28/5/18/33/2537518330097493054OgEKcN_th.jpg
Guido Salvage - "Where rust is beautiful"

Studebaker horse drawn buggy; 1946 M-16 fire truck; 1948 M-16 grain truck; 1949 2R16A grain truck; 1949 2R17A fire truck; 1950 2R5 pickup; 1952 2R17A grain truck; 1952 Packard 200 4 door; 1955 E-38 grain truck; 1957 3E-40 flatbed; 1961 6E-28 grain truck; 1962 7E-13D 4x4 rack truck; 1962 7E-7 Champ pickup; 1962 GT Hawk 4 speed; 1963 8E-28 flatbed; 1964 Avanti R2 4 speed; 1964 Cruiser and various other "treasures".

Hiding and preserving Studebakers in Richmond, Goochland & Louisa, Va.

Guido
11-29-2006, 06:17 AM
quote:Originally posted by gordr

A Porsche-powered Lark? Would that be a Plark?
I think either a Pork or a Park. :D

http://thumb14.webshots.net/t/53/453/1/21/36/2964121360097493054pVJTFL_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/57/757/2/88/4/2023288040097493054SEKowB_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/18/19/8/37/21/2050837210097493054IYBJJL_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/59/559/1/43/57/2876143570097493054jKVhDw_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/22/22/0/2/68/2589002680097493054ftBuBw_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/28/28/8/30/30/2075830300097493054aSSlFv_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/59/459/2/23/86/2067223860097493054YoeGMx_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/28/28/5/18/33/2537518330097493054OgEKcN_th.jpg
Guido Salvage - "Where rust is beautiful"

Studebaker horse drawn buggy; 1946 M-16 fire truck; 1948 M-16 grain truck; 1949 2R16A grain truck; 1949 2R17A fire truck; 1950 2R5 pickup; 1952 2R17A grain truck; 1952 Packard 200 4 door; 1955 E-38 grain truck; 1957 3E-40 flatbed; 1961 6E-28 grain truck; 1962 7E-13D 4x4 rack truck; 1962 7E-7 Champ pickup; 1962 GT Hawk 4 speed; 1963 8E-28 flatbed; 1964 Avanti R2 4 speed; 1964 Cruiser and various other "treasures".

Hiding and preserving Studebakers in Richmond, Goochland & Louisa, Va.

mbstude
11-29-2006, 07:59 AM
quote: I have all the parts to duplicate it. Just need good pictures and info. Got a 67 bus tranny and vw engine in the garge needing a home

You need a few more projects around your place. :D
How's the '51 coming along?

_____________________________________

Matthew Burnette
Hazlehurst, Georgia
'59 Scotsman PU
'63 Daytona HT

http://i81.photobucket.com/albums/j209/mbstude/side_body_avatar.jpg

http://mbstudebaker.blogspot.com/
http://thestudillac.blogspot.com/

mbstude
11-29-2006, 07:59 AM
quote: I have all the parts to duplicate it. Just need good pictures and info. Got a 67 bus tranny and vw engine in the garge needing a home

You need a few more projects around your place. :D
How's the '51 coming along?

_____________________________________

Matthew Burnette
Hazlehurst, Georgia
'59 Scotsman PU
'63 Daytona HT

http://i81.photobucket.com/albums/j209/mbstude/side_body_avatar.jpg

http://mbstudebaker.blogspot.com/
http://thestudillac.blogspot.com/