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52hawk
11-21-2006, 08:39 AM
I have new master cyl,all new lines,and all new wheel cylinders on my 61 Hawk.What's the easiest way to get them bled? Should I bench bleed the MC and just start pumping,or could I use my mighty vac,one corner at a time,to pull the fluid from the MC??

LaSalle,Il
61Hawk
60Lark

am not r2
11-21-2006, 09:30 AM
I will take a stab at this because I did it last year, bench bleed the mc. then get the wife to help pump. they like helping and it is good communication practice. they get to say they heelped.etc.
have fun.
use the vac once you have juice at all four. (don't ask how I learned this)
I was wondering what fluid you are using in an all new system? rich

64 Daytona HT
Mohawk Trails Chapter SDC

mapman
11-21-2006, 12:09 PM
Bleed the MC then bleed wheel cylinders working away from the MC. LF, RF, LR, RR. This helps push any possible contaminents out.
The pressure built in the system seals it and pushes fluid through it. It is possible to draw air in around the seals with vacuum. There are commercial pressure bleeders available and I have seen home made ones just using a brake fluid can and a hose through an old cap. they are very low pressure (couple lbs.)just to push the fluid through.
Rob

Dick Steinkamp
11-21-2006, 12:25 PM
quote:Originally posted by mapman

Bleed the MC then bleed wheel cylinders working away from the MC. LF, RF, LR, RR.


I think the bleeding sequence is one of those things that there will always be (strong) differences of opinion on.

When I do an internet search on this subject, the only advice I get is to start with the cylinder FURTHEST away from the MC (RR, LR, RF, LF)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brake_bleeding

http://www.4x4wire.com/toyota/maintenance/bleedingbrakes/

When I check my vintage Motors Manuals, they say start with the CLOSEST wheel cylinder (LF, RF, LR, RR).

I've always started with the FURTHEST and never had any problems...but I'll bet those that start with the CLOSEST don't have any problems either [^]. (Maybe those that do it randomly don't have any problems either).

Go figure :)

http://static.flickr.com/100/301465853_2dbe07b7c6_m.jpg
Dick Steinkamp
Bellingham, WA

mapman
11-21-2006, 03:43 PM
I was taught in the 70's that following the push it through method was the way to go (Motors Manual suggestion). When you rebuild the brakes you should be starting with a clean system so the real concern is just to get the air out. If you only did one wheel that would be the one you would bleed, so probably whatever gets to a firm pedal.
Rob

CHAMP
11-21-2006, 05:44 PM
I'm old school which is start from fartherest wheel away from Master Cylinder, but as the years go by I wonder if it really matters[?]

GARY H 2DR.SEDAN 48 STUDEBAKER CHAMPION NORTHEAST MD.

52hawk
11-22-2006, 08:20 AM
Thank you guys!! am not r2-I think I will go with the dot 5,since it won't be driven much,in fact will go directly to winter storage when I have brakes done.
[I know I may have to change the brake light switch later]
Without SDC and this forum,I think this car might still have been just a truck load of parts!!!

LaSalle,Il
61Hawk
60Lark

hank63
11-22-2006, 09:07 AM
Well, I've always started with whichever wheel was handy and never had any problems. But, I've always tried to make it easy to see when the old fluid is all expelled. I just buy a different colour fluid. Usually either green or red, as long as it is different from the one in the system.
/H

52 Ragtop
11-22-2006, 11:52 PM
Easiest way I've found, is to lower the rear as low as you can get it, while rasing the front. open both rear bleeders and let "gravity" do it's job. Then do the fronts the same way. One pump on each wheel and your done.
I always start at the rr, then lr, rf, lf. If you have a hill holder, bleed it first, after bench bleeding the M/C.

Jim

chocolate turkey
11-23-2006, 09:54 AM
Having been "schooled" on brake work in several countries! I have been taught that you always bench bleed the master before installing, then bleed the cylinders farthest away first, assuming the vehicle in question has 4 wheel drum brakes. When the fluid is coming out clean and the lack of air is evident, pedal hard, DONE!
I have three different tools for this process; a vacuum pump, an air pump that sucks out the juice, and a pressure bleeder. All of them work very well. I bleed my brake systems regularly and have not had to rebuild them at all over many years.

Brian

Brian K. Curtis

53k
11-23-2006, 09:22 PM
quote:Originally posted by 52hawk

Thank you guys!! am not r2-I think I will go with the dot 5,since it won't be driven much,in fact will go directly to winter storage when I have brakes done.
[I know I may have to change the brake light switch later]
Without SDC and this forum,I think this car might still have been just a truck load of parts!!!

You might want to re-think DOT-5. My experience has been that it is much more prone to leaking than DOT-3.
Another poster mentioned bleeding the Hill Holder first. I give that a big amen!. I went through over a quart of DOT-5 trying to get the pedal up and hard in my Wagonaire. I finally read about bleeding the Hill Holder- problem solved (but it was a pain to do- had to unbolt it and drop it down to reach the bleeder valve).

[img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/64%20Daytona%20Convertible/Copy%20of%20DaytonaConvert7-20-06.JPG[/img=right]

Paul Johnson
'53 Commander Starliner (since 1966)
'64 Daytona Wagonaire (original owner)
'64 Daytona Convertible (2006)
Museum R-4 engine

52hawk
11-24-2006, 07:15 AM
53k,I hadn't heard of the 'leakability'of dot5-I might just go with the 3.No hillholder on this car. Thanks!!

LaSalle,Il
61Hawk

CHAMP
11-24-2006, 07:24 AM
I have used DOT 5 for about twenty years and have never had a problem with it leaking.

GARY H 2DR.SEDAN 48 STUDEBAKER CHAMPION NORTHEAST MD.