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showbizkid
11-20-2006, 08:19 PM
I've been thinking a lot about how to press new bushings in and out of my old A-arms and searching for ways to do it without having to hunt down someone with the original Kent-Moore tool set, or trying to jury-rig my own.

I found a bushing-installer set from Minnesota Pneumatic that purports to do the job:

http://i132.photobucket.com/albums/q26/clarknovak/bushing.jpg

The description is as follows:

"Remove and install control arm bushings. Includes all adapters. Easily replace press-in type upper control arm bushings on most rear wheel drive Ford, GM and Chrysler vehicles. Mechanical screw power quickly removes the old bushing and installs the new one without damaging the control arm. Includes c-frame, screw assembly, and all adapters and inserts necessary to do the job correctly."

Whaddyou guys think? Look like it'll do the job? Anyone used one? [?]


[img=left]http://members.cox.net/clarknovak/lark.gif[/img=left]

Clark in San Diego
'63 F2/Lark Standard
http://studeblogger.blogspot.com

kmul221
11-20-2006, 08:40 PM
If it does the job without having to pull thr "A" arms & doing the bushings on a bench it sounds good to me !

gordr
11-21-2006, 03:24 AM
quote:Originally posted by showbizkid

I've been thinking a lot about how to press new bushings in and out of my old A-arms and searching for ways to do it without having to hunt down someone with the original Kent-Moore tool set, or trying to jury-rig my own.

I found a bushing-installer set from Minnesota Pneumatic that purports to do the job:

http://i132.photobucket.com/albums/q26/clarknovak/bushing.jpg

The description is as follows:

"Remove and install control arm bushings. Includes all adapters. Easily replace press-in type upper control arm bushings on most rear wheel drive Ford, GM and Chrysler vehicles. Mechanical screw power quickly removes the old bushing and installs the new one without damaging the control arm. Includes c-frame, screw assembly, and all adapters and inserts necessary to do the job correctly."

Whaddyou guys think? Look like it'll do the job? Anyone used one? [?]


[img=left]http://members.cox.net/clarknovak/lark.gif[/img=left]

Clark in San Diego
'63 F2/Lark Standard
http://studeblogger.blogspot.com


Looks like a good, sturdy tool.

Do double-check the available room in the car if you have hopes of being able to replace the bushings without removing the control arms.

Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

showbizkid
11-21-2006, 03:42 AM
I don't mind removing the arms from the car... just don't want to have to find someone who'll let me borrow their press, fab the installer, etc. etc. :D

BTW, I found this at www.sastool.com. Right on their homepage.


[img=left]http://members.cox.net/clarknovak/lark.gif[/img=left]

Clark in San Diego
'63 F2/Lark Standard
http://studeblogger.blogspot.com

Roscomacaw
11-21-2006, 02:18 PM
I'd love to try one!:)

Clark - try clicking on that link you gave us.[}:)]

Miscreant adrift in
the BerStuda Triangle!!

1957 Transtar 1/2ton
1960 Larkvertible V8
1958 Provincial wagon
1953 Commander coupe

62beater
11-21-2006, 03:49 PM
That is the exact press I used in removing and installing the bushings in my control arms (62 lark). It works ok, I had the motor out and the clip off it was still pretty hard to wiggle that thing in there. Also the steering box needed removed and the tie rods were disconected from the bell crank. Now even with that press getting the bushing out proved quite difficult requiring time, patients, three people, pry bars, and lots of heat. installing the bushings wasnt bad, one did pop out and i had to repress it in. it probably should be noted that i did this with the springs in place so i had to be very careful not to get carried away and knock the control arm off the shaft(i left the bolts in the shafts). Im not bashing this tool it works great its just a little tight in some places. good luck

Guido
11-21-2006, 05:31 PM
quote:Originally posted by 62beater

Now even with that press getting the bushing out proved quite difficult requiring time, patients, three people, pry bars, and lots of heat.
Never knew it took sick people to do this job! ;):D

http://thumb14.webshots.net/t/53/453/1/21/36/2964121360097493054pVJTFL_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/57/757/2/88/4/2023288040097493054SEKowB_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/18/19/8/37/21/2050837210097493054IYBJJL_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/59/559/1/43/57/2876143570097493054jKVhDw_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/22/22/0/2/68/2589002680097493054ftBuBw_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/28/28/8/30/30/2075830300097493054aSSlFv_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/59/459/2/23/86/2067223860097493054YoeGMx_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/28/28/5/18/33/2537518330097493054OgEKcN_th.jpg
Guido Salvage - "Where rust is beautiful"

Studebaker horse drawn buggy; 1946 M-16 fire truck; 1948 M-16 grain truck; 1949 2R16A grain truck; 1949 2R17A fire truck; 1950 2R5 pickup; 1952 2R17A grain truck; 1952 Packard 200 4 door; 1955 E-38 grain truck; 1957 3E-40 flatbed; 1961 6E-28 grain truck; 1962 7E-13D 4x4 rack truck; 1962 7E-7 Champ pickup; 1962 GT Hawk 4 speed; 1963 8E-28 flatbed; 1964 Avanti R2 4 speed; 1964 Cruiser and various other "treasures".

Hiding and preserving Studebakers in Richmond, Goochland & Louisa, Va.

CHAMP
11-21-2006, 05:39 PM
We are all sick Guido. We have Studebakeritis!:D

GARY H 2DR.SEDAN 48 STUDEBAKER CHAMPION NORTHEAST MD.

showbizkid
11-21-2006, 08:03 PM
quote:Originally posted by Mr.Biggs

I'd love to try one!:)

Clark - try clicking on that link you gave us.[}:)]


D'oh! One too many esses [:I] Try this instead:

http://www.sastool.com/


[img=left]http://members.cox.net/clarknovak/lark.gif[/img=left]

Clark in San Diego
'63 F2/Lark Standard
http://studeblogger.blogspot.com

sbca96
11-22-2006, 01:22 AM
Looks like something Harbor Freight has also.

I actually changed mine on the Hawk years ago "old school". I used a
short handled sledge hammer, one WACK knocked them out, a couple hits
with a socket over the end to contact the metal on the bushing was all
that was needed to get them back in. I used a floor jack under the
lower control arm, and removed the two bolts that hold the upper arm
to the frame. Removed the cap screws, and flipped the arm over so the
inner bushings were facing out. In my case the lower bushings were in
decent shape, the uppers were toast.

Tom

'63 Avanti, zinc plated drilled & slotted 03 Mustang Cobra 13" front disc/98 GT rear brakes, 03 Cobra 17" wheels, GM alt, 97 Z28 leather seats, soon: 97 Z28 T-56 6-spd, Ported heads w/SST full flow valves, 'R3' 276 cam, Edelbrock AFB Carb, GM HEI distributor, 8.8mm plug wires