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View Full Version : Plain Brown Wrapper @ SNM w/ on-site photo



BobPalma
11-05-2008, 08:21 PM
:) Thursday, November 6, I'll be transporting The Plain Brown Wrapper from Ted Harbit's place to The Studebaker National Museum, where it will be displayed through mid-July 2009.

It was displayed at the old museum during the winter of 1999-2000, but this will be its first trip to, and inside, the new museum.

So if you're in the area and have a few hours to again take in the new Studebaker National Museum, or see it for the first time, here's another example of the constantly-changing environment that makes it worthwhile to stop in the SNM every time you are near <s>Mecca</s> er, South Bend. :DBP

StudeRich
11-05-2008, 09:36 PM
That's great news Bob, I am sure the SNM will create a super display for our beloved Historic PBR, one that will make cousin George proud!

I wish I could be there to see it, but if you are on the walkway to that early Studebaker Wheel Monument from the unused front double doors, check out our Brick at the right front corner! [^]

You'll be seeing it in person anyway, before I am! [:0]

StudeRich
Studebakers Northwest
Ferndale, WA

Chucks Stude
11-05-2008, 10:40 PM
This is really great. Even more of a reason to visit South Bend. Congratulations.

ddub
11-06-2008, 01:07 PM
Great, how about posting a picture when it is on display?

Don Wilson
53 Commander Hardtop
64 Champ 1/2 ton
Centralia, WA

Roscomacaw
11-06-2008, 01:24 PM
Not for me to say, of course - but I'd like to think that car - with all the history it's created for the marque - would eventually end up in the museum's hands.[^]

1957 Transtar 1/2ton
1960 Larkvertible V8
1958 Provincial wagon
1953 Commander coupe
1957 President two door

DEEPNHOCK
11-06-2008, 06:24 PM
Don't take this wrong...
I am glad it is just 'on loan'...
At least there is some true control over the object by the owner.
Museums are...well...museums..
They are entrusted with artifacts.
Artifacts that can be moved around as 'they' seem fit.
How many Stude's are sold (by museums) as 'surplus' that have some history attached to them.
Does the 'enthusiast' apply that history value to them?
Tough call.
Glad the owner has decided to 'share' his Studebaker with museum goers.
Glad he has retained control of his Stude, though....
Just an opinion...
Jeff[8D]


quote:Originally posted by Mr.Biggs

Not for me to say, of course - but I'd like to think that car - with all the history it's created for the marque - would eventually end up in the museum's hands.[^]


http://i77.photobucket.com/albums/j54/deepnhock/1937CEBearfootingArtwithLabelgif-1.jpghttp://i77.photobucket.com/albums/j54/deepnhock/SDClogo4forum.jpghttp://i77.photobucket.com/albums/j54/deepnhock/StudebakerTruckFarmerStickerA-1.jpghttp://www.racingstudebakers.com/avatar_01.jpg http://community.webshots.com/user/deepnhock

BobPalma
11-06-2008, 10:06 PM
:) 'Just returned from the adventure. Up at 5:30 AM. 1957 Golden Hawk 400 guru Tom Lawlis appeared at 6:15 AM to go along.

'Hooked up the trailer, filled the truck with gas, and we were on the road to Ted Harbit's by 6:45. Arrived at Ted's earlier than expected; 8:20 AM instead of the projected 9 AM. Granddaughter Julia had stayed overnight, so Ted and Mary Ann had long been up...and had eaten all the pancakes![:0]:(

'Loaded the 'Wrapper and left Ted's, after appropriate discussion, at 9:05 AM.

'Arrived in South Bend and pulled up alongside the museum at almost exactly High Noon. 'Unloaded the 'Wrapper and drove it straight into the elevator at ground level on the south side of the musuem (after Andy Beckman opened the door, of course...)

The elevator made a quick trip to the second floor and the 'Wrapper was pushed off the elevator and onto the second floor gallery. Wheel jacks were positioned under each wheel so it could be rolled around. The car was rolled right into an empty "drive in" space at the mock Bonnie Doon drive-in eatery. The Wrapper is positioned right next to the first production Golden Hawk 400 and both have their hoods open. Museum visitors will be able to compare 1957 Golden Hawk and 1964 R3 supercharger setups side-by-side.

Display designer Don Filley surveyed the placed car and decided where to position the audio-visual kiosk that will be playing a continuous loop of the car running at The Pure Stock Drags, a disc Mary Ann made that accompanied the car on the trip to South Bend. (Expert photographer Tom Lawlis recorded everything but still prefers print film, so that will have to come later.)

Lunch followed at Joe's Bar near what little is left of The Oliver Chilled Plow industrial complex, with Andy Beckman, Tom, and Don Galeziewski.

(I had called ahead to local SDC friend Don Galezieski of South Bend to see if he wanted to join us for The Wrapper's placement and lunch. He was thrilled; he had taken the day off work at The South Bend Police Dept to get some work done around the house but gladly dropped everything to come over. It was such an unseasonably warm, pleasant day that he drove his gorgeous Red / Black Top / White Interior 1968 Dodge Dart GTS 383/4-speed to the museum and helped position the Wrapper before we went to lunch.)

Rain was forecast for later in the day, but did not begin until we were almost back to the Indianapolis area, so our early start got The Plain Brown Wrapper inside the museum several hours before any moisture appeared.

Overall, a super day with no glitches whatsoever. The car will be there until at least mid-July 2009, so stop by and have a look if you are in the area. :DBP

R3 challenger
11-08-2008, 12:28 PM
I want to thank the Studebaker National Museum for putting the Wrapper on display (it's a sneaky way to get free storage over the winter, no?) Seriously, we appreciate the interest in the car.

Our goal from the start has been to enhance the Studebaker performance image because we knew the R-engines had a potential that was virtually ignored by the muscle car community, both then and now, although that is changing thanks to Ted, Richard, Bob and many others. Those of us who were in our teens back in the late 50s and early 60s often wished that magazine coverage had been kinder, although we have to be thankful for what we got.

We're glad to hear that SNM may have an audio-visual display near the Wrapper showing its last run or two. The last run has been available for some time on the internet (PBW beat a 1970 Olds 442 with 455/365 engine). But not so well-known is the fact that it beat a red, 427 tri-power Corvette on its next-to-last run. We don't know what happened to the Corvette, but the run should have been closer than it was. But a win is a win, and we'll take it. Neither run was close.

Good idea, Dan, about posting a photo of the PBW in the museum. We'll stay on it.

George

george krem

studegary
11-08-2008, 08:48 PM
I am glad that the staff at the SNM is much better now than it was years ago when they gave my Avanti, that was on loan there, to someone else without even giving me a call. Because of this bad experience, I am now leary of musuem loans.

Gary L.
Wappinger, NY

SDC member since 1968
Studebaker enthusiast much longer

StudHawk60
11-09-2008, 11:44 AM
Just so happens that I was up in SB this past week. Went thru the museum on Thursday afternoon. I never caught on as to what car I was looking at, but I did take this picture:

http://i285.photobucket.com/albums/ll60/k2wilson/PBW.jpg


and here's the engine of that Golden Hawk 400 sitting next to it.
http://i285.photobucket.com/albums/ll60/k2wilson/GH400-1.jpg

studegary
11-09-2008, 01:11 PM
That Golden Hawk 400 engine compartment picture is good for another thread/topic where the guy claimed that a 1957 Golden Hawk 400 (the one in the SNM) had a Packard engine. I see that the GH 400 does have that rare invisible battery option &lt;G&gt;.

Gary L.
Wappinger, NY

SDC member since 1968
Studebaker enthusiast much longer

BobPalma
11-09-2008, 04:45 PM
quote:Originally posted by StudHawk60

Just so happens that I was up in SB this past week. Went thru the museum on Thursday afternoon. I never caught on as to what car I was looking at, but I did take this picture:

http://i285.photobucket.com/albums/ll60/k2wilson/PBW.jpg


and here's the engine of that Golden Hawk 400 sitting next to it.
http://i285.photobucket.com/albums/ll60/k2wilson/GH400-1.jpg


:) Boy, Keith; you are quick! Since you took those pictures Thursday afternoon, November 6th, the engine in The Plain Brown Wrapper was probably still warm...we placed the car and opened the hood just before 1 PM!

Thanks for the detail photos "on location." :DBP

StudHawk60
11-09-2008, 05:31 PM
quote:Originally posted by studegary

That Golden Hawk 400 engine compartment picture is good for another thread/topic where the guy claimed that a 1957 Golden Hawk 400 (the one in the SNM) had a Packard engine. I see that the GH 400 does have that rare invisible battery option &lt;G&gt;.

Gary L.
Wappinger, NY

SDC member since 1968
Studebaker enthusiast much longer



But at least the battery hold down is there.[8D]

Dwain G.
11-09-2008, 06:56 PM
Didn't PBW get a PowerShift trans installed shortly before 'retirement'? No ET comparisons available I don't suppose.

[IMG]http://i242.photobucket.com/albums/ff195/DwainG/champdoug.jpg[img]
Dwain G.

JRoberts
11-09-2008, 08:47 PM
quote:Originally posted by DEEPNHOCK

Don't take this wrong...
I am glad it is just 'on loan'...
At least there is some true control over the object by the owner.
Museums are...well...museums..
They are entrusted with artifacts.
Artifacts that can be moved around as 'they' seem fit.
How many Stude's are sold (by museums) as 'surplus' that have some history attached to them.
Does the 'enthusiast' apply that history value to them?
Tough call.
Glad the owner has decided to 'share' his Studebaker with museum goers.
Glad he has retained control of his Stude, though....
Just an opinion...
Jeff[8D]


quote:Originally posted by Mr.Biggs

Not for me to say, of course - but I'd like to think that car - with all the history it's created for the marque - would eventually end up in the museum's hands.[^]


http://i77.photobucket.com/albums/j54/deepnhock/1937CEBearfootingArtwithLabelgif-1.jpghttp://i77.photobucket.com/albums/j54/deepnhock/SDClogo4forum.jpghttp://i77.photobucket.com/albums/j54/deepnhock/StudebakerTruckFarmerStickerA-1.jpghttp://www.racingstudebakers.com/avatar_01.jpg http://community.webshots.com/user/deepnhock



I agree. I love the museum, but I would hate to see some of those beautiful examples simply sold off when room runs out. Cars like the PBW, need to be in the control of owners who love them and will continue their legacy.

Joe Roberts
'61 R1 Champ
'65 Cruiser
Editor of "The Down Easterner"
Eastern North Carolina Chapter

BobPalma
11-09-2008, 08:51 PM
quote:Originally posted by Dwain G.

Didn't PBW get a PowerShift trans installed shortly before 'retirement'? No ET comparisons available I don't suppose.

Dwain G.


:) Yes, Dwain; it got a complete Powershift conversion this summer. (Note the yellow transmission dipstick in the upper right corner of the engine room.)

The transmission swap was made to try to improve 60-foot times. Obviously, we planned on a full campaign appearance this year at The Pure Stock Drags, but rain prevented same. Without the rain, Ted would have had opportunity to sort out launches and such. As it was, all but three hours of test and tune were rained out at this year's event[xx(].

The Plain Brown Wrapper made three runs and Ted launched easier and better, with better average 60-foot times but no new record 60-foot time or elapsed time. We knew it would reduce terminal speed, and it did, but, of course, it's elapsed time that wins the race, not terminal speed. Really, we had little time to experiment with such a small window of actual track time available at the event this year.

The December Turning Wheels, out in a few weeks, includes a thorough report on all this, inlcuding our first inside-the-magazine color photo on one page of the report! Stay tuned.... :DBP

BobPalma
11-09-2008, 08:56 PM
quote:Originally posted by JRoberts


quote:Originally posted by DEEPNHOCK

Don't take this wrong...
I am glad it is just 'on loan'...
At least there is some true control over the object by the owner.
Museums are...well...museums..
They are entrusted with artifacts.
Artifacts that can be moved around as 'they' seem fit.
How many Stude's are sold (by museums) as 'surplus' that have some history attached to them.
Does the 'enthusiast' apply that history value to them?
Tough call.
Glad the owner has decided to 'share' his Studebaker with museum goers.
Glad he has retained control of his Stude, though....
Just an opinion...
Jeff[8D]



I agree. I love the museum, but I would hate to see some of those beautiful examples simply sold off when room runs out. Cars like the PBW, need to be in the control of owners who love them and will continue their legacy.

Joe Roberts


:) Not to worry, Jeff & Joe. George assures me the car will remain in private hands as long as one of us is alive.;) :DBP

barnlark
11-09-2008, 09:16 PM
Those engine compartments look great. That R3 is incredible to see close up. Thanks for the photos. Glad the PBW is safely tucked away this winter where folks can enjoy such an historic car. [^]
I have an ignorant question regarding the 400: Is that rubber air cleaner hose a non-original, later produced item, or stock? I have a few spare feet of different sizes of the original rubber wrapped canvas hose that Studebaker-Packard used to fit my vents and climatizer. Was that the correct material that should be there on that GH?

http://i253.photobucket.com/albums/hh48/newshooter44/DSCN1253_2.jpg

BobPalma
11-09-2008, 09:20 PM
:) Dave: The air cleaner-to-supercharger hose on the Golden Hawk 400 is a later material; probably not even available when the car was built. You likely have the correct material -or something closer to it- there in your stock, from what you said. :DBP

barnlark
11-09-2008, 09:46 PM
I wondered. The 59-60 heater core to cowl hose was the hardest to find in that material, but I found 4 feet of it. That size looks like my driver's side fender vent hose. The correct defroster hose was a tough find, too, but I sadly got a pair the same length and one is supposed to be longer. I have yet to have someone crawl up there and give a hoot other than me...every time I'm playing with gauges and my, lately, high maintenance clock.

sals54
11-10-2008, 01:30 AM
Fantastic looking cars and engine compartments. I would not mind taking a ride in the PBW. Even if it was just for a quarter of a mile.

sals54
http://i296.photobucket.com/albums/mm197/sals54/NewSignature.jpg

R3 challenger
11-10-2008, 12:57 PM
I've ridden with Ted Harbit in the PBW many times, and watching Ted at work behind the wheel is one of the biggest kicks I've ever had. Educational, too. Most of us (me included) mash the gas pedal and hang on. In the Wrapper, things happen so fast, one has enough to do just steering (keeping it going straight with the wheelspin) and trying to shift at the right times. But Ted doesn't get distracted by the rush of acceleration, wheelspin, engine roar, the guy in the other lane, etc. He's all business at all times....you get the feeling that nothing happens that he doesn't notice or that he isn't ready for.

Example: On the next-to-last run of the Wrapper (beating the 427 Corvette) we decided in advance to shift at 5,500 rpm because we were still sorting out the transmission and new tires, and there had been a lot of wheelspin on the first run. Just before the final run, however, I suggested to Ted that maybe 6,000 rpm shift points would be good to try because it was likely to be the last run of the year (heavy rain was predicted for the next day). 6,200 is even a better shift point for best times. The tach in PBW has a memory that shows exactly what the shift points were during the previous run, and, of course, it showed Ted had done exactly what we had planned. Most of us would get so pumped up with a 427 'Vette in the other lane, we would forget what was planned...but not Ted. Hope he lives forever!

George

george krem

Roscomacaw
11-10-2008, 01:17 PM
That Ted's all business on the strip is evident even from outside the car. The couple of times I've watched him drive the PBW and the 'mater, I've seen the look of calm, collected determination staring out from under the helmet.:(
While myself or others might be pumped and grinning from ear to ear, Ted's the epitome of a seasoned and focused veteran.
Less experienced, glad-handing challengers don't have much of a chance.
I feel ever-so-lucky to have watched this time machine of a car and time machine of a driver perform like a well-rehearsed symphony.[^]

1957 Transtar 1/2ton
1960 Larkvertible V8
1958 Provincial wagon
1953 Commander coupe
1957 President two door