PDA

View Full Version : 50 Pickup advice



mbaysinger
10-20-2008, 11:01 PM
newbie here

I have a 50 Studebaker pickup that is in original condition, and it is rough. Been in a barn since 88. My question is how much would something like that be worth unrestored if I just liquidated it. And would it be a good investment to restore to original or maybe customize? I'm not sure who I could have restore it in the midwest, or how much that would even cost. Any advice?

Thanks!

JDP
10-20-2008, 11:17 PM
Here's mine to give you a idea, but forget paying to have someone restore a rough truck.

http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&sspagename=STRK%3AMESELX%3AIT&viewitem=&item=290267401084



JDP/Maryland
"I'm a great believer in luck and I find the harder I work, the more I have of it."
Thomas Jefferson

StudeDave57
10-21-2008, 12:55 AM
quote:Originally posted by mbaysinger

newbie here~ My question is how much would something like that be worth unrestored if I just liquidated it. And would it be a good investment to restore to original or maybe customize? Any advice? Thanks!
Tough call~ Is the truck 'family' to you? Some vehicle's value is in what it means to you, as opposed to what the 'blue book' might say. There are so many variables to your question that it's not any easy one to answer, especially based on the little bit of info you've posted...

Give us more details and we might be able to help you better.
Pictures are always good!!! ;) :)

StudeDave '57 [8D]
San Diego, Ca. (for now...)
San Diego County SDC
www.studebakersandiego.com

'54 Commander Regal 4dr 'Ruby'
'57 Parkview 'Betsy' (she's a 2dr wagon...)
'57 Commander DeLuxe 2dr 'Baby'
'57 Champion Custom 2dr 'Jewel'
'58 Packard sedan 'Cleo'
'65 Cruiser 'Sweet Pea'

Part owner of the one and only
'55 PROTOTYPE panel van

Henry Votel
10-21-2008, 06:00 AM
Hi Mark,

Consider getting it reliably running and functioning. Let it keep it's blemishes and exterior reputation intact. Do a few renovations on some components for appearance or creature comfort. Then drive it frequently and attend some shows. You'll be very popular and you can have some fun hauling stuff, not worrying about damaging the restoration.

My 2ยข.

Henry Votel
Forest Lake, MN

52-fan
10-22-2008, 11:39 AM
I am late to this post, but I agree with Henry. If you can get the truck running and driving without spending a bundle of cash. Just drive it. You'll have fun and later you can decide if it is worth spending more to dress it up. Even if you just leave the cosmetics alone, someone will see you driving it who wants it worse than you do and you can move on to something else.

http://i152.photobucket.com/albums/s186/52-fan/StudebakersofArkansas2-1.jpg
1952 Champion Starlight, 1962 Daytona, both w/overdrive.Searcy,Arkansas
"I may be lazy, but I'm not shiftless."

garyash
10-22-2008, 02:09 PM
To paraphrase Forum member John Poulos: There is nothing more expensive than a free Studebaker!

I don't think anyone will claim that a Studebaker can be restored as an investment with a guarantee that you will make a profit. With the exception of a few rare models, it will probably cost about 3 times what you can sell it for. A 1950 pickup truck is not one of those rare models that would tempt anyone to invest heavily as a "get rich quick" scheme.

As the others have said, fix it and drive it for fun or pass it along to someone who wants that type of vehicle.

[img=left]http://www.studegarage.com/images/gary_ash_m5_sm.jpg[/img=left] Gary Ash
Dartmouth, Mass.
'48 M5
'65 Wagonaire Commander
'63 Wagonaire Standard
web site at http://www.studegarage.com

55 prez
10-22-2008, 02:29 PM
Welcome to the forum mbaysinger. I own a '50 pickup that I have enjoyed for several years without restoring. I have upgraded to a V8 engine and 12 volt system and the barn red paint is still faded but I don't have to worry about dings if I haul something.
My suggestion is to get the mechanicals trustworthy and then enjoy the truck until a latter decision on restoration. Two definite safety feature's are a dual master cylinder and seat belts.

Jim Caldwell