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Studedude1961
11-10-2006, 04:54 PM
I see in the newest Turning Wheels that the old Studebaker Administration Building is now vacant..the South Bend Public Schools Corporation has left. The future of the building is very much up in the air. I also see where a tour of the building has been tentatively scheduled by the folks planning the South Bend meet. Has anyone here been in the building recently? Any further news on its status? Once upon a time I (and others I'm sure) had hopes the building would one day serve as the new Studebaker National Museum and that the building could have been restored back to its former grandeur. Many of us who have toured the Auburn-Cord-Duesenberg Museum (in the old Auburn Admin. Building) had visions of something similar at "our" Administration Building. Not to put down the new museum building at all (we are most probably better off) but wouldn't it have been something...

Studedude1961
--1963 Cruiser

imported_n/a
11-10-2006, 05:16 PM
Saw this article, too. I hate it when this type of thing called "obsolescence" happens. Given the resources expended to construct buildings like it, it should be used much longer. It looks like a fairly large building, and that may be why finding a new occupant for the long term may be problematic. Failing that(and I'm being half facetious, here)the SDC could lease it, and use it for car meets. We could bring our camping gear & stay in the building to cut our travel expenses. Vendors could have permanent booths and warehouse space. Sorry, just thinking outside the box. ;)At least it might keep it going awhile longer.

imported_n/a
11-10-2006, 05:16 PM
Saw this article, too. I hate it when this type of thing called "obsolescence" happens. Given the resources expended to construct buildings like it, it should be used much longer. It looks like a fairly large building, and that may be why finding a new occupant for the long term may be problematic. Failing that(and I'm being half facetious, here)the SDC could lease it, and use it for car meets. We could bring our camping gear & stay in the building to cut our travel expenses. Vendors could have permanent booths and warehouse space. Sorry, just thinking outside the box. ;)At least it might keep it going awhile longer.

8E45E
11-10-2006, 05:28 PM
I also see where a tour of the building has been tentatively scheduled by the folks planning the South Bend meet. Has anyone here been in the building recently? Any further news on its status? Once upon a time I (and others I'm sure) had hopes the building would one day serve as the new Studebaker National Museum and that the building could have been restored back to its former grandeur.

Yes, I had that same thought, also, after taking a tour of it in 2002. I thought what an excellent venue for the SNM, given its historical significance. Not to mention, the freco on the top floor, stained glass windows in the boardroom, walk-in safe, and monogramed brass door knobs, among other things still in place. I certainly hope it does get a new tenant that has preservation in mind.

Craig

8E45E
11-10-2006, 05:28 PM
I also see where a tour of the building has been tentatively scheduled by the folks planning the South Bend meet. Has anyone here been in the building recently? Any further news on its status? Once upon a time I (and others I'm sure) had hopes the building would one day serve as the new Studebaker National Museum and that the building could have been restored back to its former grandeur.

Yes, I had that same thought, also, after taking a tour of it in 2002. I thought what an excellent venue for the SNM, given its historical significance. Not to mention, the freco on the top floor, stained glass windows in the boardroom, walk-in safe, and monogramed brass door knobs, among other things still in place. I certainly hope it does get a new tenant that has preservation in mind.

Craig

studeclunker
11-10-2006, 06:24 PM
What I don't get, is that the museum bought an unrelated building and is going to retrofit it for the archives. Wouldn't the old admin. building be better? They could lease out the space they don't need. I'm sure the city would cut them a good deal (espically being that the museum is owned by the city...). But what do I know?

http://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b18/Studeclunker/studebaby/54wagonblue-2.jpghttp://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b18/Studeclunker/studebaby/red54wagon-1.jpg http://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b18/Studeclunker/studebaby/62lark-1.jpg
Lotsa Larks!
K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
Ron Smith

studeclunker
11-10-2006, 06:24 PM
What I don't get, is that the museum bought an unrelated building and is going to retrofit it for the archives. Wouldn't the old admin. building be better? They could lease out the space they don't need. I'm sure the city would cut them a good deal (espically being that the museum is owned by the city...). But what do I know?

http://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b18/Studeclunker/studebaby/54wagonblue-2.jpghttp://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b18/Studeclunker/studebaby/red54wagon-1.jpg http://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b18/Studeclunker/studebaby/62lark-1.jpg
Lotsa Larks!
K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
Ron Smith

DEEPNHOCK
11-10-2006, 06:55 PM
The archives building is right next door (across the street due South)to the SNM (in an old corner old bar).
Jeff[8D]


quote:Originally posted by studeclunker

What I don't get, is that the museum bought an unrelated building and is going to retrofit it for the archives. Wouldn't the old admin. building be better? They could lease out the space they don't need. I'm sure the city would cut them a good deal (espically being that the museum is owned by the city...). But what do I know?
Ron Smith

DEEPNHOCK
11-10-2006, 06:55 PM
The archives building is right next door (across the street due South)to the SNM (in an old corner old bar).
Jeff[8D]


quote:Originally posted by studeclunker

What I don't get, is that the museum bought an unrelated building and is going to retrofit it for the archives. Wouldn't the old admin. building be better? They could lease out the space they don't need. I'm sure the city would cut them a good deal (espically being that the museum is owned by the city...). But what do I know?
Ron Smith

Roscomacaw
11-10-2006, 10:11 PM
When I was in SB in 97, I just walked into the bldg and asked the first person I came across if there'd be a problem looking around. This fella consulted with a couple other folks there and gave me the go-ahead to take a look.
More than anything, I wanted to see the murals depicting the history of wheeled travel that covers the upper walls of the conference room. I did just that. Further, I got to see the president's office that overlooked the main entrance and even got pretty snoopy since no one challenged my wanderings until some gal detected me going up an access stairwell of some sort that I THINK led to the roof. I ALMOST got to open the door at the top of this steep stairs before she called up from below me and asked what I thought I was doing.
Once I explained that I'd cleared my "tour" with some folks downstairs, she turned friendly and was willing to answer some questions as best she could. In fact, she led me to an office and introduced me to a gal that had worked there during Studebaker's final days!
The decor of the place was pure 60s and that in itself was a cool sorta time warp! Damned shame if it comes to it being torn down, BUT - I believe a brand new museum serves the club and artifacts better.;)

Miscreant adrift in
the BerStuda Triangle!!

1957 Transtar 1/2ton
1960 Larkvertible V8
1958 Provincial wagon
1953 Commander coupe

Roscomacaw
11-10-2006, 10:11 PM
When I was in SB in 97, I just walked into the bldg and asked the first person I came across if there'd be a problem looking around. This fella consulted with a couple other folks there and gave me the go-ahead to take a look.
More than anything, I wanted to see the murals depicting the history of wheeled travel that covers the upper walls of the conference room. I did just that. Further, I got to see the president's office that overlooked the main entrance and even got pretty snoopy since no one challenged my wanderings until some gal detected me going up an access stairwell of some sort that I THINK led to the roof. I ALMOST got to open the door at the top of this steep stairs before she called up from below me and asked what I thought I was doing.
Once I explained that I'd cleared my "tour" with some folks downstairs, she turned friendly and was willing to answer some questions as best she could. In fact, she led me to an office and introduced me to a gal that had worked there during Studebaker's final days!
The decor of the place was pure 60s and that in itself was a cool sorta time warp! Damned shame if it comes to it being torn down, BUT - I believe a brand new museum serves the club and artifacts better.;)

Miscreant adrift in
the BerStuda Triangle!!

1957 Transtar 1/2ton
1960 Larkvertible V8
1958 Provincial wagon
1953 Commander coupe

Scott
11-11-2006, 08:21 AM
I've heard of buildings being sold for a dollar. Maybe South Bend would sell it to a preservation committee organized by the Studebaker Drivers Club for $1. That would be exciting. I'm not sure how we'd pay for maintenance, but maybe in conjunction with another group it could be done. It OUGHT to be on the National Register of Historic Places. That's something the club could also spearhead. If it is on the list it can't be torn down without TONS of approvals, and maybe not even then. I've heard of some very ugly and obscure things being on the register that really probably shouldn't be. I'm actually surprised that this building isn't already on the list. Time to mobilize.

Scott
11-11-2006, 08:21 AM
I've heard of buildings being sold for a dollar. Maybe South Bend would sell it to a preservation committee organized by the Studebaker Drivers Club for $1. That would be exciting. I'm not sure how we'd pay for maintenance, but maybe in conjunction with another group it could be done. It OUGHT to be on the National Register of Historic Places. That's something the club could also spearhead. If it is on the list it can't be torn down without TONS of approvals, and maybe not even then. I've heard of some very ugly and obscure things being on the register that really probably shouldn't be. I'm actually surprised that this building isn't already on the list. Time to mobilize.

DEEPNHOCK
11-11-2006, 08:27 AM
Mobilize?
Who are you kidding?
Nobody wants the building, the maintenance, the asbestos.
The only thing anyone wants is the tax revenue, and that won't happen until the old building is gone and a new whatevermall is built and occupied.
Spearhead?
Maybe the SDC could buy it with all the missing funds we never hear about being (not) recovered...
I'd sooner see the membership spearhead that recovery than an old unused building.
Jeff[8D]


quote:Originally posted by Scott

I've heard of buildings being sold for a dollar. Maybe South Bend would sell it to a preservation committee organized by the Studebaker Drivers Club for $1. That would be exciting. I'm not sure how we'd pay for maintenance, but maybe in conjunction with another group it could be done. It OUGHT to be on the National Register of Historic Places. That's something the club could also spearhead. If it is on the list it can't be torn down without TONS of approvals, and maybe not even then. I've heard of some very ugly and obscure things being on the register that really probably shouldn't be. I'm actually surprised that this building isn't already on the list. Time to mobilize.


http://i77.photobucket.com/albums/j54/deepnhock/Jeff%20Rice%20Studebaker%20Pictures/1937StudebakerCoupeExpressJeffRicee.jpg

DEEPNHOCK at Gmail.com
Brooklet, Georgia
'37 Coupe Express (never ending project)
'37 Coupe Express Trailer (project)
'61 Hawk (project)
http://community.webshots.com/user/deepnhock

DEEPNHOCK
11-11-2006, 08:27 AM
Mobilize?
Who are you kidding?
Nobody wants the building, the maintenance, the asbestos.
The only thing anyone wants is the tax revenue, and that won't happen until the old building is gone and a new whatevermall is built and occupied.
Spearhead?
Maybe the SDC could buy it with all the missing funds we never hear about being (not) recovered...
I'd sooner see the membership spearhead that recovery than an old unused building.
Jeff[8D]


quote:Originally posted by Scott

I've heard of buildings being sold for a dollar. Maybe South Bend would sell it to a preservation committee organized by the Studebaker Drivers Club for $1. That would be exciting. I'm not sure how we'd pay for maintenance, but maybe in conjunction with another group it could be done. It OUGHT to be on the National Register of Historic Places. That's something the club could also spearhead. If it is on the list it can't be torn down without TONS of approvals, and maybe not even then. I've heard of some very ugly and obscure things being on the register that really probably shouldn't be. I'm actually surprised that this building isn't already on the list. Time to mobilize.


http://i77.photobucket.com/albums/j54/deepnhock/Jeff%20Rice%20Studebaker%20Pictures/1937StudebakerCoupeExpressJeffRicee.jpg

DEEPNHOCK at Gmail.com
Brooklet, Georgia
'37 Coupe Express (never ending project)
'37 Coupe Express Trailer (project)
'61 Hawk (project)
http://community.webshots.com/user/deepnhock

Scott
11-11-2006, 08:50 AM
Jeff,

Your opinion is obviously held by a minority of persons that have posted on the topic. I don't care much about most of the other buildings, but this one is different. We talk about the history of Studebaker and its vehicles. If we're not ready to help save the headquarters where a lot of that history happened then I'm not sure what the purpose of the club is. It's also not just about the cars, but about an attractive historic building that is usable and can be saved. We're not talking about a burned out hulk or some warehouse. Historic preservation is not supported by a fringe element, but by people who finally had enough of the rape of our cities by "progress". South Bend is no shining example of good stewardship of older buildings, but that doesn't mean this one has to come down, too.

Scott
11-11-2006, 08:50 AM
Jeff,

Your opinion is obviously held by a minority of persons that have posted on the topic. I don't care much about most of the other buildings, but this one is different. We talk about the history of Studebaker and its vehicles. If we're not ready to help save the headquarters where a lot of that history happened then I'm not sure what the purpose of the club is. It's also not just about the cars, but about an attractive historic building that is usable and can be saved. We're not talking about a burned out hulk or some warehouse. Historic preservation is not supported by a fringe element, but by people who finally had enough of the rape of our cities by "progress". South Bend is no shining example of good stewardship of older buildings, but that doesn't mean this one has to come down, too.

DEEPNHOCK
11-11-2006, 09:20 AM
Opinions are like.....
Yes, I may well be in the minority of posters on this forum (or with this subject).. But this is not a new subject, or a new issue. This buildings future has been in doubt, and a subject of much discussion, since Studebaker shut down the last part of their auto business decades ago (wasn't that SASCO?). Having a majority of people have the desire to see something saved won't mean it will be saved. Money will be what decides this issue. Hard earned money. That will just fix the building. Then, after that is done it will take more money. That money will be for the taxes due. The 'value' of that building to the local government is not 'historical' the them. The revenue the property will generate in taxes is the 'value' that they see and seek.
What I am saying here is that the building is doomed unless money comes forward to turn the heads of local taxpayers, businessmen, and local government agencies. The populace of South Bend doesn't give a whit about the building, especially if it means their tax dollars will end up supporting it. Tell them that the property will generate more tax revenue as an industrial park, or a shopping center...and it is gone. (Shoot, they would have gladly blown it up in 1967)...
I understand the sentiment to see it saved, and don't disagree with it.
But...
The historical aspect of Studebaker has had all the chips placed within the SNM building(s), and possibly Tippecanoe place. There has been no headstrong attempt to save much else of the Studebaker architecture in South Bend. Having said that, the placing of that particular building on the National Register of Historic Buildings will bring with it a huge burdon to whomever does the deed. The upkeep, maintenance, and tax burden will be borne by who? A bunch of Studebaker enthusiasts? Shoot, that group couldn't even agree on the SNM site for years and years, let alone the funding for it.
I am not being a naysayer here. Just a realist.
If you want to see that building saved, go out and find a tenant for it that will put the money into it that it needs. Maybe that should be the cause that the club membership should rallye around.
Jeff[8D]



quote:Originally posted by Scott

Jeff,
Your opinion is obviously held by a minority of persons that have posted on the topic. I don't care much about most of the other buildings, but this one is different. We talk about the history of Studebaker and its vehicles. If we're not ready to help save the headquarters where a lot of that history happened then I'm not sure what the purpose of the club is. It's also not just about the cars, but about an attractive historic building that is usable and can be saved. We're not talking about a burned out hulk or some warehouse. Historic preservation is not supported by a fringe element, but by people who finally had enough of the rape of our cities by "progress". South Bend is no shining example of good stewardship of older buildings, but that doesn't mean this one has to come down, too.

DEEPNHOCK
11-11-2006, 09:20 AM
Opinions are like.....
Yes, I may well be in the minority of posters on this forum (or with this subject).. But this is not a new subject, or a new issue. This buildings future has been in doubt, and a subject of much discussion, since Studebaker shut down the last part of their auto business decades ago (wasn't that SASCO?). Having a majority of people have the desire to see something saved won't mean it will be saved. Money will be what decides this issue. Hard earned money. That will just fix the building. Then, after that is done it will take more money. That money will be for the taxes due. The 'value' of that building to the local government is not 'historical' the them. The revenue the property will generate in taxes is the 'value' that they see and seek.
What I am saying here is that the building is doomed unless money comes forward to turn the heads of local taxpayers, businessmen, and local government agencies. The populace of South Bend doesn't give a whit about the building, especially if it means their tax dollars will end up supporting it. Tell them that the property will generate more tax revenue as an industrial park, or a shopping center...and it is gone. (Shoot, they would have gladly blown it up in 1967)...
I understand the sentiment to see it saved, and don't disagree with it.
But...
The historical aspect of Studebaker has had all the chips placed within the SNM building(s), and possibly Tippecanoe place. There has been no headstrong attempt to save much else of the Studebaker architecture in South Bend. Having said that, the placing of that particular building on the National Register of Historic Buildings will bring with it a huge burdon to whomever does the deed. The upkeep, maintenance, and tax burden will be borne by who? A bunch of Studebaker enthusiasts? Shoot, that group couldn't even agree on the SNM site for years and years, let alone the funding for it.
I am not being a naysayer here. Just a realist.
If you want to see that building saved, go out and find a tenant for it that will put the money into it that it needs. Maybe that should be the cause that the club membership should rallye around.
Jeff[8D]



quote:Originally posted by Scott

Jeff,
Your opinion is obviously held by a minority of persons that have posted on the topic. I don't care much about most of the other buildings, but this one is different. We talk about the history of Studebaker and its vehicles. If we're not ready to help save the headquarters where a lot of that history happened then I'm not sure what the purpose of the club is. It's also not just about the cars, but about an attractive historic building that is usable and can be saved. We're not talking about a burned out hulk or some warehouse. Historic preservation is not supported by a fringe element, but by people who finally had enough of the rape of our cities by "progress". South Bend is no shining example of good stewardship of older buildings, but that doesn't mean this one has to come down, too.

imported_n/a
11-11-2006, 01:13 PM
Old buildings are like old cars--most people take the path of least resistance, and opt for a new one, if they can. Not advocating that approach, necessarily. It is just the way it is in our society, and the bean-counters usually back them up. Around here, the average life expectancy of a convenience store, restaurant, bank branch or convnience store building is 25 years, and getting even shorter. You've generally got that syndrome of obsolescence working against you, when it comes to saving good old buildings. Sure, there are preservationists at work--but they are usually faced with very high costs in bringing a building up to "Code" and making the end result nice enough to be able to justify the expense to investors and community leaders. So, it ends up costing nearly as much as a new one, or more. By the way--they are getting ready to demolish a 30 year old shopping mall here. The location is good, structure is sound, community is growing--but going to that Mall is "so totally uncool!". Progress, I guess they'd say. [:0]

imported_n/a
11-11-2006, 01:13 PM
Old buildings are like old cars--most people take the path of least resistance, and opt for a new one, if they can. Not advocating that approach, necessarily. It is just the way it is in our society, and the bean-counters usually back them up. Around here, the average life expectancy of a convenience store, restaurant, bank branch or convnience store building is 25 years, and getting even shorter. You've generally got that syndrome of obsolescence working against you, when it comes to saving good old buildings. Sure, there are preservationists at work--but they are usually faced with very high costs in bringing a building up to "Code" and making the end result nice enough to be able to justify the expense to investors and community leaders. So, it ends up costing nearly as much as a new one, or more. By the way--they are getting ready to demolish a 30 year old shopping mall here. The location is good, structure is sound, community is growing--but going to that Mall is "so totally uncool!". Progress, I guess they'd say. [:0]

Studedude1961
11-11-2006, 02:03 PM
Here in Omaha, and perhaps in South Bend or in your town, we hear the "Oh God if onlys" more and more often now that old buildings really do generate not only good feelings but money. In Omaha a generation ago you couldn't GIVE away old buildings and warehouses. Now the buildings that escaped the wrecking ball are being rehabbed into lofts, apartments and neat shopping destinations and are certainly back on the tax rolls earning as much, if not more than convenience stores and strip malls. Our old buildings are what define what is special about any town. "God does Omaha have a cool Wal-Mart or WHAT?" seldom slips from the lips of anyone but everyone loves our historic Old Market area. I'd hate to see the old Administration Building torn down 10 years before it could have been saved and treasured but as DEEP so rightfully said, right now nobody wants the maintenance and asbestos. When I started this topic I hoped perhaps someone had an inside news tip that indeed the building would be saved, but that doesn't appear likely.

Studedude1961
11-11-2006, 02:03 PM
Here in Omaha, and perhaps in South Bend or in your town, we hear the "Oh God if onlys" more and more often now that old buildings really do generate not only good feelings but money. In Omaha a generation ago you couldn't GIVE away old buildings and warehouses. Now the buildings that escaped the wrecking ball are being rehabbed into lofts, apartments and neat shopping destinations and are certainly back on the tax rolls earning as much, if not more than convenience stores and strip malls. Our old buildings are what define what is special about any town. "God does Omaha have a cool Wal-Mart or WHAT?" seldom slips from the lips of anyone but everyone loves our historic Old Market area. I'd hate to see the old Administration Building torn down 10 years before it could have been saved and treasured but as DEEP so rightfully said, right now nobody wants the maintenance and asbestos. When I started this topic I hoped perhaps someone had an inside news tip that indeed the building would be saved, but that doesn't appear likely.

Swifster
11-11-2006, 02:24 PM
The architecture on those old buildings is fabulous...but, money talks. There are untold numbers of old buildings in downtown Detroit that have been left vacant for years. Vandals have stripped every piece of salvagable copper, steel and whatnot leaving nothing but an ugly shell. And when talk of tearing down these old relics surfaces, a small group shows up, moans and groans about the past and says someone should save the building.

And no one is willing to pay for what's left, let alone the cost of refurbishment. Jeff is absolutely correct. The city wants tax revenues. An old, abandoned building creates $0 for the city. The cost of the asbestos removal alone would be more than the buildings worth. The property these old buildings sit on is worth far more. The only reason those buildings still stand at this time is the cost of demolition.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Tom - Lakeland, FL

1964 Studebaker Daytona

Michigan Speed - www.michiganspeed.com
Club Hot Rod - www.clubhotrod.com
LS1 Tech - www.ls1tech.com

Swifster
11-11-2006, 02:24 PM
The architecture on those old buildings is fabulous...but, money talks. There are untold numbers of old buildings in downtown Detroit that have been left vacant for years. Vandals have stripped every piece of salvagable copper, steel and whatnot leaving nothing but an ugly shell. And when talk of tearing down these old relics surfaces, a small group shows up, moans and groans about the past and says someone should save the building.

And no one is willing to pay for what's left, let alone the cost of refurbishment. Jeff is absolutely correct. The city wants tax revenues. An old, abandoned building creates $0 for the city. The cost of the asbestos removal alone would be more than the buildings worth. The property these old buildings sit on is worth far more. The only reason those buildings still stand at this time is the cost of demolition.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Tom - Lakeland, FL

1964 Studebaker Daytona

Michigan Speed - www.michiganspeed.com
Club Hot Rod - www.clubhotrod.com
LS1 Tech - www.ls1tech.com

lstude
11-11-2006, 02:58 PM
No one could even save to old Packard administration building in Detroit. This picture was taken by a Packard Club member just before it was torn down.

http://i99.photobucket.com/albums/l288/lstude/PackardbyAdministrationbuilding.jpg



Leonard Shepherd, editor, The Commanding Leader, Central Virginia Chapter, http://centralvirginiachapter.org/
http://i99.photobucket.com/albums/l288/lstude/Mein64Daytonasm.jpghttp://i99.photobucket.com/albums/l288/lstude/52inyardsm-1.jpg

lstude
11-11-2006, 02:58 PM
No one could even save to old Packard administration building in Detroit. This picture was taken by a Packard Club member just before it was torn down.

http://i99.photobucket.com/albums/l288/lstude/PackardbyAdministrationbuilding.jpg



Leonard Shepherd, editor, The Commanding Leader, Central Virginia Chapter, http://centralvirginiachapter.org/
http://i99.photobucket.com/albums/l288/lstude/Mein64Daytonasm.jpghttp://i99.photobucket.com/albums/l288/lstude/52inyardsm-1.jpg

Scott
11-11-2006, 03:09 PM
What you say is true of a large number of buildings that are on the National Register of Historic Places. Renovation is costly, but the historic value is the key to saving a building like this, not money alone. That's part of the idea of having a national register. It helps protect buildings from a pure "money talks" attitude. In Minneapolis we saved the Milwaukee Road Depot after it had been vacant for about 20 years and not used as a terminal in probably more like 30. It came close to being torn down more than once. Finally, a proposal to make the covered track area a skating rink and the interior as part of a Marriot (with the rooms decorated in 1920s style) along with a swanky restaurant in the large waiting area saved the day. The building WAS derelict and no doubt had asbestos, but it was saved and now is a really beaulitful place to go to. Pessimism doesn't win the day on buildings like this. It's a long slow process with the probability of some false starts, but it doesn't get done unless it gets STARTED. That's where we're at on the administration building. The city would probably back an initiative by outsiders that's realistic, but it's unlikely to be the originators of a scheme, since they've not done so to this point that I know of.

Scott
11-11-2006, 03:09 PM
What you say is true of a large number of buildings that are on the National Register of Historic Places. Renovation is costly, but the historic value is the key to saving a building like this, not money alone. That's part of the idea of having a national register. It helps protect buildings from a pure "money talks" attitude. In Minneapolis we saved the Milwaukee Road Depot after it had been vacant for about 20 years and not used as a terminal in probably more like 30. It came close to being torn down more than once. Finally, a proposal to make the covered track area a skating rink and the interior as part of a Marriot (with the rooms decorated in 1920s style) along with a swanky restaurant in the large waiting area saved the day. The building WAS derelict and no doubt had asbestos, but it was saved and now is a really beaulitful place to go to. Pessimism doesn't win the day on buildings like this. It's a long slow process with the probability of some false starts, but it doesn't get done unless it gets STARTED. That's where we're at on the administration building. The city would probably back an initiative by outsiders that's realistic, but it's unlikely to be the originators of a scheme, since they've not done so to this point that I know of.

Swifster
11-11-2006, 03:34 PM
quote:Originally posted by Scott

The city would probably back an initiative by outsiders that's realistic, but it's unlikely to be the originators of a scheme, since they've not done so to this point that I know of.


Most cities would. The question becomes, what is realistic? Has anyone put a plan in motion? There are all kinds of 'historic' buildings but what is worth saving? The Packard building was designed by Albert Kahn, a renowned architech in his day and famous in the Detroit area. And that didn't save a building that was partially occupied.

Other than this was a Studebaker building, what makes this historical? Is the architecture uncommon? Was it used for something other than an office building? I also like Chryslers, but I shed no tears when many of the old buildings in Highland Park were torn down.

Speaking of railroads, the city of Detroit would like someone to come up with a plan for this....

http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i280/Swifster/54mcfull.jpg

It's the Michigan Central Railroad Station. It's on the Register for Historic Places. It's been abandoned for over 30 years. The city can't afford to tear it down, and no one wants it. It's sad to see a proud building reduced to this.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Tom - Lakeland, FL

1964 Studebaker Daytona

Michigan Speed - www.michiganspeed.com
Club Hot Rod - www.clubhotrod.com
LS1 Tech - www.ls1tech.com

Swifster
11-11-2006, 03:34 PM
quote:Originally posted by Scott

The city would probably back an initiative by outsiders that's realistic, but it's unlikely to be the originators of a scheme, since they've not done so to this point that I know of.


Most cities would. The question becomes, what is realistic? Has anyone put a plan in motion? There are all kinds of 'historic' buildings but what is worth saving? The Packard building was designed by Albert Kahn, a renowned architech in his day and famous in the Detroit area. And that didn't save a building that was partially occupied.

Other than this was a Studebaker building, what makes this historical? Is the architecture uncommon? Was it used for something other than an office building? I also like Chryslers, but I shed no tears when many of the old buildings in Highland Park were torn down.

Speaking of railroads, the city of Detroit would like someone to come up with a plan for this....

http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i280/Swifster/54mcfull.jpg

It's the Michigan Central Railroad Station. It's on the Register for Historic Places. It's been abandoned for over 30 years. The city can't afford to tear it down, and no one wants it. It's sad to see a proud building reduced to this.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Tom - Lakeland, FL

1964 Studebaker Daytona

Michigan Speed - www.michiganspeed.com
Club Hot Rod - www.clubhotrod.com
LS1 Tech - www.ls1tech.com

imported_n/a
11-11-2006, 04:30 PM
The bean-counters aren't always right. I've read (here) that saving a dollar or two on every car was the reason Studebaker didn't install a deflector/wheelhouse on the front end of their cars, and so they rusted faster. It sounds like a pretty self-defeating policy. Someday, I hope everyone will realize the throwaway, quick-buck, new-is-good, old-is-bad approach isn't the answer.

imported_n/a
11-11-2006, 04:30 PM
The bean-counters aren't always right. I've read (here) that saving a dollar or two on every car was the reason Studebaker didn't install a deflector/wheelhouse on the front end of their cars, and so they rusted faster. It sounds like a pretty self-defeating policy. Someday, I hope everyone will realize the throwaway, quick-buck, new-is-good, old-is-bad approach isn't the answer.

Scott
11-11-2006, 04:44 PM
Tom,

That Michigan Central building looks like a great candidate for rehabilitation. It's an eyesore now maybe, but being on the list gives it a chance of outliving the current status quo of the city and someday being something special again. It happened here. It can happen there, too, I would think.

Too bad about the Packard building. They can't always be saved in time. :(

Scott
11-11-2006, 04:44 PM
Tom,

That Michigan Central building looks like a great candidate for rehabilitation. It's an eyesore now maybe, but being on the list gives it a chance of outliving the current status quo of the city and someday being something special again. It happened here. It can happen there, too, I would think.

Too bad about the Packard building. They can't always be saved in time. :(

studeclunker
11-11-2006, 06:50 PM
Jeff, you make a living, or at least support your hobby, on the whatnots that keep obsolete cars on the road. You do this with an excellence that commends you. In fact, you drive the equivilent of a dinosaur, in the automobile industry. You bring up some valid points. Please forgive me saying this, but many of your previous arguments don't do you justice.

I've seen pictures of the Studebaker Administration Building. It's not much to look at architecturally. Historically speaking, the building represents a great deal in the background of South Bend. Part of this accounts for the animosity boiling in the background of the residents of South Bend. They resent that the town's largest employer abandoned them.

The fact remains that Studebaker had a great deal to do with the development and growth of South Bend. Also remember please folks, Studebaker didn't just build automobiles. They also built horsedrawn vehicles. In fact, they were at one time the largest manufacturer of such in the world. THIS is the reason for preserving the Admin. Building. The rest of the buildings must, sadly, go. This one should by rights be saved.

How does one argue the virtues of historical preservation? It by logic and economy is foolish and counter-productive. Still, a city has a history and a past that can't be ignored. We have seen perhaps, more than our share of the destruction of our past in Southern California and the west coast. Erasing the past of a city is harmful to the wellbeing of it's inhabitants and removes the character of that city. Not all of us love WalMart and the shopping mall.

I'm going to quit here before being accused of another rant. Just keep in mind, the preservation of the Studebaker Administration building is a worthy and excellent cause for the Studebaker Driver's club. After all, our organization would'nt exist but for this building and it's generations of inhabitants.

One more thing, then I promise to shut up.

There are considerable tax and governmental benefits to be gained in having a building named on the historical register. One doesn't have to be the owner of a building, by the way, to get it named as such. The owner can oppose, and has considerable weight in doing so, but they cannot stop the process. Many buildings have been saved this way when an owner wanted to destroy it. The tax burden of the building has been mentioned. This can be reduced, even eliminated, by the city and the federal government.

I admit and conceed that these afore mentioned benefits do not even come close to covering the cost of preserving and restoring historical buildings. They just help considerably.

Now, as promised, I'm shutting up

http://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b18/Studeclunker/studebaby/54wagonblue-2.jpghttp://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b18/Studeclunker/studebaby/red54wagon-1.jpg http://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b18/Studeclunker/studebaby/62lark-1.jpg
Lotsa Larks!
K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
Ron Smith

studeclunker
11-11-2006, 06:50 PM
Jeff, you make a living, or at least support your hobby, on the whatnots that keep obsolete cars on the road. You do this with an excellence that commends you. In fact, you drive the equivilent of a dinosaur, in the automobile industry. You bring up some valid points. Please forgive me saying this, but many of your previous arguments don't do you justice.

I've seen pictures of the Studebaker Administration Building. It's not much to look at architecturally. Historically speaking, the building represents a great deal in the background of South Bend. Part of this accounts for the animosity boiling in the background of the residents of South Bend. They resent that the town's largest employer abandoned them.

The fact remains that Studebaker had a great deal to do with the development and growth of South Bend. Also remember please folks, Studebaker didn't just build automobiles. They also built horsedrawn vehicles. In fact, they were at one time the largest manufacturer of such in the world. THIS is the reason for preserving the Admin. Building. The rest of the buildings must, sadly, go. This one should by rights be saved.

How does one argue the virtues of historical preservation? It by logic and economy is foolish and counter-productive. Still, a city has a history and a past that can't be ignored. We have seen perhaps, more than our share of the destruction of our past in Southern California and the west coast. Erasing the past of a city is harmful to the wellbeing of it's inhabitants and removes the character of that city. Not all of us love WalMart and the shopping mall.

I'm going to quit here before being accused of another rant. Just keep in mind, the preservation of the Studebaker Administration building is a worthy and excellent cause for the Studebaker Driver's club. After all, our organization would'nt exist but for this building and it's generations of inhabitants.

One more thing, then I promise to shut up.

There are considerable tax and governmental benefits to be gained in having a building named on the historical register. One doesn't have to be the owner of a building, by the way, to get it named as such. The owner can oppose, and has considerable weight in doing so, but they cannot stop the process. Many buildings have been saved this way when an owner wanted to destroy it. The tax burden of the building has been mentioned. This can be reduced, even eliminated, by the city and the federal government.

I admit and conceed that these afore mentioned benefits do not even come close to covering the cost of preserving and restoring historical buildings. They just help considerably.

Now, as promised, I'm shutting up

http://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b18/Studeclunker/studebaby/54wagonblue-2.jpghttp://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b18/Studeclunker/studebaby/red54wagon-1.jpg http://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b18/Studeclunker/studebaby/62lark-1.jpg
Lotsa Larks!
K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
Ron Smith

Scott
11-11-2006, 08:09 PM
It was mentioned that there are murals in the conference room. What other unique and irreplaceable things are in the building? Architecturally, I agree with the assessment that the building is not gorgeous. But from what I read at the link given below, Studebaker's management didn't want an ostentatious building, but one that reflected the serious, practical and sturdy qualities of the company. I think they succeeded there. Here is a site that lists this as an endangered building: http://www.historiclandmarks.org/news/2006_10Most/10most06-10.html

I might contact them next week and find out what individuals can do to help. It can't hurt to ask, and that seems to be what they want.

Scott
11-11-2006, 08:09 PM
It was mentioned that there are murals in the conference room. What other unique and irreplaceable things are in the building? Architecturally, I agree with the assessment that the building is not gorgeous. But from what I read at the link given below, Studebaker's management didn't want an ostentatious building, but one that reflected the serious, practical and sturdy qualities of the company. I think they succeeded there. Here is a site that lists this as an endangered building: http://www.historiclandmarks.org/news/2006_10Most/10most06-10.html

I might contact them next week and find out what individuals can do to help. It can't hurt to ask, and that seems to be what they want.

studeclunker
11-12-2006, 01:33 AM
quote:
http://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b18/Studeclunker/studebaby/studeadminbuilding.jpg
The South Bend School Corporation plans to vacate the 1909 Studebaker Administration Building in summer 2006. Without a new use, the building could face demolition.


10 Most Endangered (2006)
Studebaker Administration Building
(New on 10 Most list)
635 North Main Street, South Bend

From 1868 to 1963, Studebaker wagons and automobiles rolled out of the manufacturer’s South Bend plants and into America’s garages and hearts. By 2008, only two landmarks will remain to mark the company’s storied industrial presence in the city. The four-story Studebaker Administration Building opened in 1909 to accommodate the firm’s expanding white-color staff. Designed in the Renaissance Revival style by influential architect Solon Spencer Beman, the massive red-brick structure also housed employee clubs that offered recreation and fellowship, with a bowling alley, billiard tables, an exercise room and more. In 1941, the company declared the Administration Building a landmark reflection of “the character of Studebaker….strong…ruddy and robust, but not fancy or smeared with gadgets.”

The threat: The South Bend School Corporation owns the Administration Building, which it received as a gift from the city in 1970 and will occupy until this summer. Negative local perceptions of the building’s size—150,000 square feet—and reusability cloud its prospects. Historic Landmarks has been given permission to market the structure for redevelopment; if we don’t find a buyer, the building may meet the same fate as all but one of the many historic Studebaker manufacturing facilities—demolition.



I thought this might be of interest to all and sundry. Notice please, that the building is still in reasonably good condition. Unlike the Packard or MCRR station. If we can rattle the cages of our wealthier patrons, perhaps, just perhaps, this one part of the Studebaker complex can be saved.

This was sent to me tonight in an e-mail. The sender has given me permission to reproduce it here. It's something else I thought everyone might find interesting:


quote:I've been in the old administration building a couple months ago. My late Mother used to teach elementary school in SB (I could go into many more stories on this topic, but I won't) so with some name-dropping I was granted full snooping to the building. I would say very little has changed since Studebaker moved out in the mid-60's. Everything is retro 60's looking with the exception of the third floor. The third floor looks very much like it would have about 1920. Also the basement still contains the original cast-iron coal furnaces from the 1900's.

I get really annoyed at the lack of anyone wanting to preserve anything Studebaker. In Feb 2005 I attended the demolition of the main Studebaker plant (stamping plant). I weaseled by way into getting a tour through the buildings the day before. I was absolutely amazed at how much Studebaker memorabilia and artifacts still existed in the buildings. I ended up spending the whole day loading my 61 lark I drove down with signs from the old stude assembly line, etc. I even got one sign that said "Studebaker policy, no men allowed riding cars down assembly line". I mentioned the vast amount of these artifacts to **** **** and *** ****, and they were like, nah nothing worth saving there. I was shocked of how easily they are letting history slip away.


I must repeat, I'm grateful to people like Dr. Cade and many others that have done so much to preserve these cars. My gratitude is tempered by thier doing so to their own benefit. They restored the

studeclunker
11-12-2006, 01:33 AM
quote:
http://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b18/Studeclunker/studebaby/studeadminbuilding.jpg
The South Bend School Corporation plans to vacate the 1909 Studebaker Administration Building in summer 2006. Without a new use, the building could face demolition.


10 Most Endangered (2006)
Studebaker Administration Building
(New on 10 Most list)
635 North Main Street, South Bend

From 1868 to 1963, Studebaker wagons and automobiles rolled out of the manufacturer’s South Bend plants and into America’s garages and hearts. By 2008, only two landmarks will remain to mark the company’s storied industrial presence in the city. The four-story Studebaker Administration Building opened in 1909 to accommodate the firm’s expanding white-color staff. Designed in the Renaissance Revival style by influential architect Solon Spencer Beman, the massive red-brick structure also housed employee clubs that offered recreation and fellowship, with a bowling alley, billiard tables, an exercise room and more. In 1941, the company declared the Administration Building a landmark reflection of “the character of Studebaker….strong…ruddy and robust, but not fancy or smeared with gadgets.”

The threat: The South Bend School Corporation owns the Administration Building, which it received as a gift from the city in 1970 and will occupy until this summer. Negative local perceptions of the building’s size—150,000 square feet—and reusability cloud its prospects. Historic Landmarks has been given permission to market the structure for redevelopment; if we don’t find a buyer, the building may meet the same fate as all but one of the many historic Studebaker manufacturing facilities—demolition.



I thought this might be of interest to all and sundry. Notice please, that the building is still in reasonably good condition. Unlike the Packard or MCRR station. If we can rattle the cages of our wealthier patrons, perhaps, just perhaps, this one part of the Studebaker complex can be saved.

This was sent to me tonight in an e-mail. The sender has given me permission to reproduce it here. It's something else I thought everyone might find interesting:


quote:I've been in the old administration building a couple months ago. My late Mother used to teach elementary school in SB (I could go into many more stories on this topic, but I won't) so with some name-dropping I was granted full snooping to the building. I would say very little has changed since Studebaker moved out in the mid-60's. Everything is retro 60's looking with the exception of the third floor. The third floor looks very much like it would have about 1920. Also the basement still contains the original cast-iron coal furnaces from the 1900's.

I get really annoyed at the lack of anyone wanting to preserve anything Studebaker. In Feb 2005 I attended the demolition of the main Studebaker plant (stamping plant). I weaseled by way into getting a tour through the buildings the day before. I was absolutely amazed at how much Studebaker memorabilia and artifacts still existed in the buildings. I ended up spending the whole day loading my 61 lark I drove down with signs from the old stude assembly line, etc. I even got one sign that said "Studebaker policy, no men allowed riding cars down assembly line". I mentioned the vast amount of these artifacts to **** **** and *** ****, and they were like, nah nothing worth saving there. I was shocked of how easily they are letting history slip away.


I must repeat, I'm grateful to people like Dr. Cade and many others that have done so much to preserve these cars. My gratitude is tempered by thier doing so to their own benefit. They restored the

Swifster
11-12-2006, 11:49 AM
quote:Originally posted by studeclunker

I must repeat, I'm grateful to people like Dr. Cade and many others that have done so much to preserve these cars. My gratitude is tempered by thier doing so to their own benefit. They restored the cars for themselves. Just like I tinker with my cars for myself. Still, were I in the same wealthy position, would I think beyond my own selfishness to another cause to benefit generations yet to come?

Ron Smith


I'm sorry Ron, but I find this to be just wrong. If it makes good business sense, someone will utlize the building. Pandering to someone else to purchase the building and calling them selfish if they don't just isn't right. I'd suggest that if you are that passionate about that building that you lay out your money, or secure the funding necessary like any other business enterprise (use of the building, business plan, locating local partners, securing funding, etc.) and put follow it thru.

If there is a logic business model to keep this building (lofts, office space, etc.), the building will be used. It's been a couple years since I was in that area (for the museum) and can't remember seeing this as an area where lofts would do well. I also don't remember this as an area that was thriving to the point where the building would be seen as a 'can't miss' proposition. If I won the lottery, I'd be more inclined to buy Tiger Stadium in Detroit than the Stude Admin building from a business perspective.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Tom - Lakeland, FL

1964 Studebaker Daytona

Michigan Speed - www.michiganspeed.com
Club Hot Rod - www.clubhotrod.com
LS1 Tech - www.ls1tech.com

Swifster
11-12-2006, 11:49 AM
quote:Originally posted by studeclunker

I must repeat, I'm grateful to people like Dr. Cade and many others that have done so much to preserve these cars. My gratitude is tempered by thier doing so to their own benefit. They restored the cars for themselves. Just like I tinker with my cars for myself. Still, were I in the same wealthy position, would I think beyond my own selfishness to another cause to benefit generations yet to come?

Ron Smith


I'm sorry Ron, but I find this to be just wrong. If it makes good business sense, someone will utlize the building. Pandering to someone else to purchase the building and calling them selfish if they don't just isn't right. I'd suggest that if you are that passionate about that building that you lay out your money, or secure the funding necessary like any other business enterprise (use of the building, business plan, locating local partners, securing funding, etc.) and put follow it thru.

If there is a logic business model to keep this building (lofts, office space, etc.), the building will be used. It's been a couple years since I was in that area (for the museum) and can't remember seeing this as an area where lofts would do well. I also don't remember this as an area that was thriving to the point where the building would be seen as a 'can't miss' proposition. If I won the lottery, I'd be more inclined to buy Tiger Stadium in Detroit than the Stude Admin building from a business perspective.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Tom - Lakeland, FL

1964 Studebaker Daytona

Michigan Speed - www.michiganspeed.com
Club Hot Rod - www.clubhotrod.com
LS1 Tech - www.ls1tech.com

Studedude1961
11-12-2006, 02:37 PM
The Administration building isn't in the greatest location for lofts/shops etc. It is partially obscured and divided from downtown South Bend by an elevated rail bed and bridge and the only scenery visible from the south end of the building would be a prison. You would spot, a few blocks away...the SASCO Building (old Studebaker Engineering). Otherwise the area is pretty spartan and run down.

After reading everyone's pros and cons on this forum and with some experience in witnessing how these things usually go, the Administration Building is most probably a goner. Hopefully demolition will be put off until after the 2007 meet so we can all say goodbye and snoop around a bit.

Studedude1961
11-12-2006, 02:37 PM
The Administration building isn't in the greatest location for lofts/shops etc. It is partially obscured and divided from downtown South Bend by an elevated rail bed and bridge and the only scenery visible from the south end of the building would be a prison. You would spot, a few blocks away...the SASCO Building (old Studebaker Engineering). Otherwise the area is pretty spartan and run down.

After reading everyone's pros and cons on this forum and with some experience in witnessing how these things usually go, the Administration Building is most probably a goner. Hopefully demolition will be put off until after the 2007 meet so we can all say goodbye and snoop around a bit.

studeclunker
11-12-2006, 03:43 PM
You know Dude, that's a great idea! Perhaps tours could be arranged with the city. It would be a nice addition to the meet.

Tom, for your info, from Encylopedia Britannica World Language Dictonary:
Pan der noun One who minisers to the passions or base desires of others: a procurer: Pimp.
1 To minister to the passions or prejudices of others; procure for others the means of gratifying lust.

You might want to check the definition of a word before you use it. Still, I get the gist. I have already established that if I had the money it would go this way. Also mentioned, or at least intimated, was that I don't have it. Nevertheless, if someone doesn't shake the trees from time to time the apples won't fall on their own. If someone is in the position to get things going I am more than willing to donate the two things I have: time and knowledge. How about you?

Historical preservation very rarely makes good business sense. Often it's for the benefit of the residents of a given community. Loosely defined as a community, the SDC could be included with the city of South Bend. It is to our benefit for this building to be perserved as much as the city's residents. Had the business acumen been applied, places like the Old Market area in Omaha, the Milwaukee Road Depot, Olvera Street in Los Angeles, etc, would never have been done.

There was a movie put out in the early '70s that dealt with the psycological fallout from the modernizing and bulldozing of historic communities. In Europe the results of WWII was that enormous sections of cities were completely leveled. This was largely replaced with modern buildings. The result was the erasing of the character of many communities. The population of these communities responded very negatively to this. This psycological reaction was named (and the movie as well); Future Shock.

It has been clinically proven that the erasing of a community's physical past has a negative effect on that community's population. Yes, urban blight needs cleaning up. Most of the Studebaker complex has become a blight on the community of South Bend. It needed removing. Still, this one part, this one building, could be a start on revitalizing the area. It's a nice building. Why waste it?

Since it looks like this building may go the way of the rest of these structures, perhaps some of the elements could be saved. The conference room could be saved. So could other elements of the building. In fact, that could be a project the SDC is more than capable of doing.

If I have come on too strong in this thread and offended anyone, My appologies to your offense. In no way or form did I mean to single out anyone (least of all the good Doctor). I do not in any way appologise for my passion to historical preservation. I think it's essential to our country and people. If business had their way the downtown areas of most communities would be bulldozed to make way for big box stores like WalMart and Home Depot.

After all, that's one of the reasons I drive a forty year old car...:D

http://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b18/Studeclunker/studebaby/54wagonblue-2.jpghttp://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b18/Studeclunker/studebaby/red54wagon-1.jpg
Lotsa Larks!
K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
Ron Smith

studeclunker
11-12-2006, 03:43 PM
You know Dude, that's a great idea! Perhaps tours could be arranged with the city. It would be a nice addition to the meet.

Tom, for your info, from Encylopedia Britannica World Language Dictonary:
Pan der noun One who minisers to the passions or base desires of others: a procurer: Pimp.
1 To minister to the passions or prejudices of others; procure for others the means of gratifying lust.

You might want to check the definition of a word before you use it. Still, I get the gist. I have already established that if I had the money it would go this way. Also mentioned, or at least intimated, was that I don't have it. Nevertheless, if someone doesn't shake the trees from time to time the apples won't fall on their own. If someone is in the position to get things going I am more than willing to donate the two things I have: time and knowledge. How about you?

Historical preservation very rarely makes good business sense. Often it's for the benefit of the residents of a given community. Loosely defined as a community, the SDC could be included with the city of South Bend. It is to our benefit for this building to be perserved as much as the city's residents. Had the business acumen been applied, places like the Old Market area in Omaha, the Milwaukee Road Depot, Olvera Street in Los Angeles, etc, would never have been done.

There was a movie put out in the early '70s that dealt with the psycological fallout from the modernizing and bulldozing of historic communities. In Europe the results of WWII was that enormous sections of cities were completely leveled. This was largely replaced with modern buildings. The result was the erasing of the character of many communities. The population of these communities responded very negatively to this. This psycological reaction was named (and the movie as well); Future Shock.

It has been clinically proven that the erasing of a community's physical past has a negative effect on that community's population. Yes, urban blight needs cleaning up. Most of the Studebaker complex has become a blight on the community of South Bend. It needed removing. Still, this one part, this one building, could be a start on revitalizing the area. It's a nice building. Why waste it?

Since it looks like this building may go the way of the rest of these structures, perhaps some of the elements could be saved. The conference room could be saved. So could other elements of the building. In fact, that could be a project the SDC is more than capable of doing.

If I have come on too strong in this thread and offended anyone, My appologies to your offense. In no way or form did I mean to single out anyone (least of all the good Doctor). I do not in any way appologise for my passion to historical preservation. I think it's essential to our country and people. If business had their way the downtown areas of most communities would be bulldozed to make way for big box stores like WalMart and Home Depot.

After all, that's one of the reasons I drive a forty year old car...:D

http://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b18/Studeclunker/studebaby/54wagonblue-2.jpghttp://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b18/Studeclunker/studebaby/red54wagon-1.jpg
Lotsa Larks!
K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
Ron Smith

Studedude1961
11-12-2006, 04:41 PM
Ron thanks for plugging the Old Market here in Omaha. I live about 10 blocks southwest of the Old Market in a 1915 four-square so yeah, I like old buildings. Omaha found out (rudely) that once old buildings are bulldozed they are GONE. The Old Market could have been double the size it is right now had "a large multinational agricultural marketing firm that will go unnamed" not blackmailed Omaha into bulldozing dozens of old warehouse buildings so it could built its world headquarters campus on the edge of the Missouri River. The corporation has been laying off people since. Its campus is nice but looks very suburban and does not fit the area. The Old Market has grown as much as it can because of lack of buildings. The "old crap buildings" of the 1970s are now highly coveted in the Old Market area. Fortunately, the north Downtown area, once populated with furniture builders and other small industries, is now being looked at as the next Old Market. Called "NoDo" (for north downtown) one of the largest developments has been the complete conversion of the old Ford Motor Co. assembly plant here into apartments and lofts. 25 years ago it would have been torn down. South Bend, though sick of the Studebaker corridor now, may one day look back and say "if only we had saved it."

Studedude1961
11-12-2006, 04:41 PM
Ron thanks for plugging the Old Market here in Omaha. I live about 10 blocks southwest of the Old Market in a 1915 four-square so yeah, I like old buildings. Omaha found out (rudely) that once old buildings are bulldozed they are GONE. The Old Market could have been double the size it is right now had "a large multinational agricultural marketing firm that will go unnamed" not blackmailed Omaha into bulldozing dozens of old warehouse buildings so it could built its world headquarters campus on the edge of the Missouri River. The corporation has been laying off people since. Its campus is nice but looks very suburban and does not fit the area. The Old Market has grown as much as it can because of lack of buildings. The "old crap buildings" of the 1970s are now highly coveted in the Old Market area. Fortunately, the north Downtown area, once populated with furniture builders and other small industries, is now being looked at as the next Old Market. Called "NoDo" (for north downtown) one of the largest developments has been the complete conversion of the old Ford Motor Co. assembly plant here into apartments and lofts. 25 years ago it would have been torn down. South Bend, though sick of the Studebaker corridor now, may one day look back and say "if only we had saved it."

Scott
11-12-2006, 06:02 PM
I'd rather not be in the position of having to explain to new members in 5 years how the SDC membership didn't think it worthwhile to try to save the corporate headquarters from the wrecking ball when something could have been done.

I also would want to ask where the Studebaker family organization stands on all this. We don't hear much from them, which is something I don't quite undestand, but you'd think that organization might also have some interest in this building not being torn down.

It's often a single building in a run down district that becomes the focal point for a revitalization of an area.

New isn't always better either. The Metropolitan Building in Minneapolis was shamelessly destroyed in the early 1960s even though it was full of tenants and the building was in very good shape. It was beautiful, and irreplaceable, but the city tore it down over protests and the site ended up as a vacant lot until 1980. I wouldn't want South Bend to make as big a blunder as that.

Scott
11-12-2006, 06:02 PM
I'd rather not be in the position of having to explain to new members in 5 years how the SDC membership didn't think it worthwhile to try to save the corporate headquarters from the wrecking ball when something could have been done.

I also would want to ask where the Studebaker family organization stands on all this. We don't hear much from them, which is something I don't quite undestand, but you'd think that organization might also have some interest in this building not being torn down.

It's often a single building in a run down district that becomes the focal point for a revitalization of an area.

New isn't always better either. The Metropolitan Building in Minneapolis was shamelessly destroyed in the early 1960s even though it was full of tenants and the building was in very good shape. It was beautiful, and irreplaceable, but the city tore it down over protests and the site ended up as a vacant lot until 1980. I wouldn't want South Bend to make as big a blunder as that.

Swifster
11-12-2006, 08:20 PM
quote:Originally posted by studeclunker

Tom, for your info, from Encylopedia Britannica World Language Dictonary:
Pan der noun One who minisers to the passions or base desires of others: a procurer: Pimp.
1 To minister to the passions or prejudices of others; procure for others the means of gratifying lust.

You might want to check the definition of a word before you use it.

I won't get into the nuts and bolts of why I think this word fits, but I stand by what I wrote. Let's just say that liberating Dr. Cade's money from his wallet for that building ends with the same result [:o)].

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Tom - Lakeland, FL

1964 Studebaker Daytona

Michigan Speed - www.michiganspeed.com
Club Hot Rod - www.clubhotrod.com
LS1 Tech - www.ls1tech.com

Swifster
11-12-2006, 08:20 PM
quote:Originally posted by studeclunker

Tom, for your info, from Encylopedia Britannica World Language Dictonary:
Pan der noun One who minisers to the passions or base desires of others: a procurer: Pimp.
1 To minister to the passions or prejudices of others; procure for others the means of gratifying lust.

You might want to check the definition of a word before you use it.

I won't get into the nuts and bolts of why I think this word fits, but I stand by what I wrote. Let's just say that liberating Dr. Cade's money from his wallet for that building ends with the same result [:o)].

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Tom - Lakeland, FL

1964 Studebaker Daytona

Michigan Speed - www.michiganspeed.com
Club Hot Rod - www.clubhotrod.com
LS1 Tech - www.ls1tech.com

imported_n/a
11-12-2006, 08:45 PM
OH, I don't know--I think it might make a good home office for an insurance claims adjusting service. :)

imported_n/a
11-12-2006, 08:45 PM
OH, I don't know--I think it might make a good home office for an insurance claims adjusting service. :)

Swifster
11-12-2006, 09:18 PM
quote:Originally posted by Packebaker

OH, I don't know--I think it might make a good home office for an insurance claims adjusting service. :)


Heck, I still have room in my 12' X 12' office...[:p]

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Tom - Lakeland, FL

1964 Studebaker Daytona

Michigan Speed - www.michiganspeed.com
Club Hot Rod - www.clubhotrod.com
LS1 Tech - www.ls1tech.com

Swifster
11-12-2006, 09:18 PM
quote:Originally posted by Packebaker

OH, I don't know--I think it might make a good home office for an insurance claims adjusting service. :)


Heck, I still have room in my 12' X 12' office...[:p]

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Tom - Lakeland, FL

1964 Studebaker Daytona

Michigan Speed - www.michiganspeed.com
Club Hot Rod - www.clubhotrod.com
LS1 Tech - www.ls1tech.com

8E45E
11-13-2006, 07:13 AM
Noble as your desire is, nobody is going to say a word about it.


[size=1][quote]Originally posted by Scott
. The Metropolitan Building in Minneapolis was shamelessly destroyed in the early 1960s even though it was full of tenants and the building was in very good shape. It was beautiful, and irreplaceable, but the city tore it down over protests and the site ended up as a vacant lot until 1980. I wouldn't want South Bend to make as big a blunder as that.

All I can say is, if it truly has to be razed, I would like to see all the interior trimming that is Studebaker related saved and transplanted to the new museum. i.e., the doors with the monogrammed door handles can be removed, and saved. Also the President's Office (and Vice President's) fireplaces and other 4th floor woodwork can be transplanted into 'themerooms' at the new museum, as with the stained glass. The only challenge will be the mural-of-transportation on the top floor that would have to be carefully removed, but it can be done. True, it will take a lot of work, but I would volunteer my time to assist in the removal of these irreplacable components and transfer them to the new museum.

Craig

8E45E
11-13-2006, 07:13 AM
Noble as your desire is, nobody is going to say a word about it.


[size=1][quote]Originally posted by Scott
. The Metropolitan Building in Minneapolis was shamelessly destroyed in the early 1960s even though it was full of tenants and the building was in very good shape. It was beautiful, and irreplaceable, but the city tore it down over protests and the site ended up as a vacant lot until 1980. I wouldn't want South Bend to make as big a blunder as that.

All I can say is, if it truly has to be razed, I would like to see all the interior trimming that is Studebaker related saved and transplanted to the new museum. i.e., the doors with the monogrammed door handles can be removed, and saved. Also the President's Office (and Vice President's) fireplaces and other 4th floor woodwork can be transplanted into 'themerooms' at the new museum, as with the stained glass. The only challenge will be the mural-of-transportation on the top floor that would have to be carefully removed, but it can be done. True, it will take a lot of work, but I would volunteer my time to assist in the removal of these irreplacable components and transfer them to the new museum.

Craig

DEEPNHOCK
11-13-2006, 07:44 AM
I guess that is where I see the disconnect Scott.
Most members don't care now, let alone 5 years from now (that is an assumption, but it does have some history behind it)
That may sound coarse, but it has already been proven with the SNM project. Noble as your desire is, nobody is going to say a word about it.
Continuing, the Studebaker 'family' has had very little to do with anything 'Studebaker' except the geneaology and historical family references, and even that has been a private family matter (apologies to any Studebaker family member if I am wrong here)..
You are right about a single building making a difference. It is usually a building that is the cornerstone of a coordinated effort that is supported by both the local government, and the community (ie: banking, real estate, and contractors). That is non-existant here. Shoot, the city already 'gave' the building to a taxpayer supported organization, and even they decided to leave it. They decided that leaving was a more prudent use of taxpayer dollars (or felt the rath of the taxpaying citizenship about spending to keep this building up and running).
My point in the original comment was that this idea has no support from the 2/3 of the organizations that would be required to make it happen. The local citizenship doesn't seem to care. If you took ALL of the SDC membership and tried to do a mass campaign, you would only have a minimum of 7.7% people in favor of this (2000 census population of 107,789 compared to 14,000 {est) SDC members).
While I do think that the building is interesting, I do not see the local government getting behind this idea. The local government in South Bend would probably not see the removal of that building as a blunder. Especially if it were to be replaced with a tax revenue generating building.
The Metropolitan Co. never attempted to do anything with that building in Minnesota, did they? (I ask that because I do not know the details of that razing)
The desire for a philanthropist to step in is a good one. Attracting a philanthropist to step forward will never happen if one goes about it by saying out loud they should spread their wealth in a particular direction, or point out that the investments they have made in whatever projects they have is a selfish one. Philanthropists operate a bit differently than that.
In closing, I want to say again that I have no problem with trying to save this, or any other building. I am just saying that there must be support from many venues (besides the SDC, or it's members)to get it to happen. This particular idea does not appear to have this support.
Maybe that will change.
Jeff[8D]



quote:Originally posted by Scott

I'd rather not be in the position of having to explain to new members in 5 years how the SDC membership didn't think it worthwhile to try to save the corporate headquarters from the wrecking ball when something could have been done.
I also would want to ask where the Studebaker family organization stands on all this. We don't hear much from them, which is something I don't quite undestand, but you'd think that organization might also have some interest in this building not being torn down.
It's often a single building in a run down district that becomes the focal point for a revitalization of an area.
New isn't always better either. The Metropolitan Building in Minneapolis was shamelessly destroyed in the early 1960s even though it was full of tenants and the building was in very good shape. It was beautiful, and irreplaceable, but the city tore it down over protests and the site ended up as a vacant lot until 1980. I wouldn't want South Bend to make as big a blunder as that.

DEEPNHOCK
11-13-2006, 07:44 AM
I guess that is where I see the disconnect Scott.
Most members don't care now, let alone 5 years from now (that is an assumption, but it does have some history behind it)
That may sound coarse, but it has already been proven with the SNM project. Noble as your desire is, nobody is going to say a word about it.
Continuing, the Studebaker 'family' has had very little to do with anything 'Studebaker' except the geneaology and historical family references, and even that has been a private family matter (apologies to any Studebaker family member if I am wrong here)..
You are right about a single building making a difference. It is usually a building that is the cornerstone of a coordinated effort that is supported by both the local government, and the community (ie: banking, real estate, and contractors). That is non-existant here. Shoot, the city already 'gave' the building to a taxpayer supported organization, and even they decided to leave it. They decided that leaving was a more prudent use of taxpayer dollars (or felt the rath of the taxpaying citizenship about spending to keep this building up and running).
My point in the original comment was that this idea has no support from the 2/3 of the organizations that would be required to make it happen. The local citizenship doesn't seem to care. If you took ALL of the SDC membership and tried to do a mass campaign, you would only have a minimum of 7.7% people in favor of this (2000 census population of 107,789 compared to 14,000 {est) SDC members).
While I do think that the building is interesting, I do not see the local government getting behind this idea. The local government in South Bend would probably not see the removal of that building as a blunder. Especially if it were to be replaced with a tax revenue generating building.
The Metropolitan Co. never attempted to do anything with that building in Minnesota, did they? (I ask that because I do not know the details of that razing)
The desire for a philanthropist to step in is a good one. Attracting a philanthropist to step forward will never happen if one goes about it by saying out loud they should spread their wealth in a particular direction, or point out that the investments they have made in whatever projects they have is a selfish one. Philanthropists operate a bit differently than that.
In closing, I want to say again that I have no problem with trying to save this, or any other building. I am just saying that there must be support from many venues (besides the SDC, or it's members)to get it to happen. This particular idea does not appear to have this support.
Maybe that will change.
Jeff[8D]



quote:Originally posted by Scott

I'd rather not be in the position of having to explain to new members in 5 years how the SDC membership didn't think it worthwhile to try to save the corporate headquarters from the wrecking ball when something could have been done.
I also would want to ask where the Studebaker family organization stands on all this. We don't hear much from them, which is something I don't quite undestand, but you'd think that organization might also have some interest in this building not being torn down.
It's often a single building in a run down district that becomes the focal point for a revitalization of an area.
New isn't always better either. The Metropolitan Building in Minneapolis was shamelessly destroyed in the early 1960s even though it was full of tenants and the building was in very good shape. It was beautiful, and irreplaceable, but the city tore it down over protests and the site ended up as a vacant lot until 1980. I wouldn't want South Bend to make as big a blunder as that.

lstude
11-13-2006, 07:01 PM
I may be veering way off the subject here, but I would like to see the Studebaker Administration building saved, also. I have seen some buildings saved here in Richmond, VA, mainly due to historical preservation money and finding uses for the buildings. The one I am the most happy about is the Lauritzen Nash Dealership building. Lauritzen sold Studebakers before WWII, but switched to Nash during the war and moved to another building. The building has just been renovated. There are some other buildings that are not architecturally significant that have also been renovated here. One is the Todd?s Ham building. I was somewhat involved in that one and it was a very difficult building to renovate with the solid concrete floors and ceilings. It has been turned into living spaces. There is another old manufacturing building that is also being turned into living spaces and that is the old Southern Stove Works.
http://i99.photobucket.com/albums/l288/lstude/LauritzenNashbuilding11.jpg
http://i99.photobucket.com/albums/l288/lstude/Nashphotos091.jpg

Leonard Shepherd, editor, The Commanding Leader, Central Virginia Chapter, http://centralvirginiachapter.org/
http://i99.photobucket.com/albums/l288/lstude/Mein64Daytonasm.jpghttp://i99.photobucket.com/albums/l288/lstude/52inyardsm-1.jpg

lstude
11-13-2006, 07:01 PM
I may be veering way off the subject here, but I would like to see the Studebaker Administration building saved, also. I have seen some buildings saved here in Richmond, VA, mainly due to historical preservation money and finding uses for the buildings. The one I am the most happy about is the Lauritzen Nash Dealership building. Lauritzen sold Studebakers before WWII, but switched to Nash during the war and moved to another building. The building has just been renovated. There are some other buildings that are not architecturally significant that have also been renovated here. One is the Todd?s Ham building. I was somewhat involved in that one and it was a very difficult building to renovate with the solid concrete floors and ceilings. It has been turned into living spaces. There is another old manufacturing building that is also being turned into living spaces and that is the old Southern Stove Works.
http://i99.photobucket.com/albums/l288/lstude/LauritzenNashbuilding11.jpg
http://i99.photobucket.com/albums/l288/lstude/Nashphotos091.jpg

Leonard Shepherd, editor, The Commanding Leader, Central Virginia Chapter, http://centralvirginiachapter.org/
http://i99.photobucket.com/albums/l288/lstude/Mein64Daytonasm.jpghttp://i99.photobucket.com/albums/l288/lstude/52inyardsm-1.jpg

Dick Steinkamp
11-13-2006, 07:29 PM
quote:Originally posted by lstude

http://i99.photobucket.com/albums/l288/lstude/LauritzenNashbuilding11.jpg



That is a VERY attractive building [^]. I can picture it as one of those "specialty car dealers" that are becoming more common [8D].

One of the "keys"...as Jeff alluded to...is the economics of the whole thing. If somebody can't make money on a project like that, it's not going to happen.

Here in Bellingham, the whole "town" of Fairhaven is getting a makeover due to the economics of doing so. Here's a few pics of a car show we held there this year...

http://static.flickr.com/100/296890053_9c7bc93125.jpg

http://static.flickr.com/103/296890060_3098af3643.jpg

http://static.flickr.com/114/296890049_222fd9f0ec.jpg

Scott...if you can figure out a way for you or somebody else to make money by saving the Admin Building, then it can happen. If not, I don't think anybody will do it out of the goodness of their heart, unfortunately.



http://static.flickr.com/100/292046667_cc1661ba0e_m.jpg

Dick Steinkamp
11-13-2006, 07:29 PM
quote:Originally posted by lstude

http://i99.photobucket.com/albums/l288/lstude/LauritzenNashbuilding11.jpg



That is a VERY attractive building [^]. I can picture it as one of those "specialty car dealers" that are becoming more common [8D].

One of the "keys"...as Jeff alluded to...is the economics of the whole thing. If somebody can't make money on a project like that, it's not going to happen.

Here in Bellingham, the whole "town" of Fairhaven is getting a makeover due to the economics of doing so. Here's a few pics of a car show we held there this year...

http://static.flickr.com/100/296890053_9c7bc93125.jpg

http://static.flickr.com/103/296890060_3098af3643.jpg

http://static.flickr.com/114/296890049_222fd9f0ec.jpg

Scott...if you can figure out a way for you or somebody else to make money by saving the Admin Building, then it can happen. If not, I don't think anybody will do it out of the goodness of their heart, unfortunately.



http://static.flickr.com/100/292046667_cc1661ba0e_m.jpg

lstude
11-13-2006, 09:03 PM
quote:Here in Bellingham, the whole "town" of Fairhaven is getting a makeover due to the economics of doing so. Here's a few pics of a car show we held there this year...

When I went to the SDC International Meet in Spokane, I drove from Spokane to Seattle and then flew back to Virginia. I took a lot of back roads and went though some small towns that looked like time had passed them by. It was a very interesting trip since I love old buildings as much as old cars. Below are some pictures I took of a town in Washington State. Sorry, I can't remember the name of it. I love that Whispering Palms bar.
http://i99.photobucket.com/albums/l288/lstude/WesternWashingtonroadside005.jpg
http://i99.photobucket.com/albums/l288/lstude/WesternWashingtonroadside003.jpg
http://i99.photobucket.com/albums/l288/lstude/WesternWashingtonroadside001.jpg


Leonard Shepherd, editor, The Commanding Leader, Central Virginia Chapter, http://centralvirginiachapter.org/
http://i99.photobucket.com/albums/l288/lstude/Mein64Daytonasm.jpghttp://i99.photobucket.com/albums/l288/lstude/52inyardsm-1.jpg

lstude
11-13-2006, 09:03 PM
quote:Here in Bellingham, the whole "town" of Fairhaven is getting a makeover due to the economics of doing so. Here's a few pics of a car show we held there this year...

When I went to the SDC International Meet in Spokane, I drove from Spokane to Seattle and then flew back to Virginia. I took a lot of back roads and went though some small towns that looked like time had passed them by. It was a very interesting trip since I love old buildings as much as old cars. Below are some pictures I took of a town in Washington State. Sorry, I can't remember the name of it. I love that Whispering Palms bar.
http://i99.photobucket.com/albums/l288/lstude/WesternWashingtonroadside005.jpg
http://i99.photobucket.com/albums/l288/lstude/WesternWashingtonroadside003.jpg
http://i99.photobucket.com/albums/l288/lstude/WesternWashingtonroadside001.jpg


Leonard Shepherd, editor, The Commanding Leader, Central Virginia Chapter, http://centralvirginiachapter.org/
http://i99.photobucket.com/albums/l288/lstude/Mein64Daytonasm.jpghttp://i99.photobucket.com/albums/l288/lstude/52inyardsm-1.jpg

8E45E
11-14-2006, 08:01 AM
It was a very interesting trip since I love old buildings as much as old cars. Below are some pictures I took of a town in Washington State. Sorry, I can't remember the name of it. I love that Whispering Palms bar.


Its nice to see a late 40's, early 50's building like that still in use; especially as what it was originally designed for. Reminds me of the old Coffee Cup Inn (long gone) in Edmonton, with those rounded windows on it.

Craig.

8E45E
11-14-2006, 08:01 AM
It was a very interesting trip since I love old buildings as much as old cars. Below are some pictures I took of a town in Washington State. Sorry, I can't remember the name of it. I love that Whispering Palms bar.


Its nice to see a late 40's, early 50's building like that still in use; especially as what it was originally designed for. Reminds me of the old Coffee Cup Inn (long gone) in Edmonton, with those rounded windows on it.

Craig.

Scott
11-14-2006, 09:21 AM
I've spoken with the Historic Landmarks of Indiana Foundation and got some encouranging news that things are moving in a positive direction to save the administration building (keep your fingers crossed). If the building was to be torn down, the conference room interior and J.M.'s office would be salvaged for the museum. However, the entire building itself has a good chance of survival at this point.

To set the record straight on the condition of this building, this is what I now know: the building is solid as a rock and in excellent shape. There is little asbestos, and is primarily used around some pipes in the basement. J.M.'s office is extremely well preserved, as are the murals in the conference room. Some heat and air movement is still on in the building.

Maybe this will change the minds of a few that the building is worth saving.

Scott
11-14-2006, 09:21 AM
I've spoken with the Historic Landmarks of Indiana Foundation and got some encouranging news that things are moving in a positive direction to save the administration building (keep your fingers crossed). If the building was to be torn down, the conference room interior and J.M.'s office would be salvaged for the museum. However, the entire building itself has a good chance of survival at this point.

To set the record straight on the condition of this building, this is what I now know: the building is solid as a rock and in excellent shape. There is little asbestos, and is primarily used around some pipes in the basement. J.M.'s office is extremely well preserved, as are the murals in the conference room. Some heat and air movement is still on in the building.

Maybe this will change the minds of a few that the building is worth saving.

Dwain G.
11-14-2006, 11:20 AM
The name of the town in lstude's photos is Ritzville, an historic old town. Around 1900 they claimed to ship more wheat from Ritzville than any other inland port in the world. The parapet in the background in the middle photo is on a 1902 drugstore. It is restored and houses boutique shops as I recall.
I [i]always[i] stop in Ritzville when I'm crossing I-90. If you are there and have time, pick up the little booklet "Historic Ritzville, a Walking Tour" from one of the downtown businesses.

http://home.comcast.net/~jdwain/63.63.jpg
Dwain G.

Dwain G.
11-14-2006, 11:20 AM
The name of the town in lstude's photos is Ritzville, an historic old town. Around 1900 they claimed to ship more wheat from Ritzville than any other inland port in the world. The parapet in the background in the middle photo is on a 1902 drugstore. It is restored and houses boutique shops as I recall.
I [i]always[i] stop in Ritzville when I'm crossing I-90. If you are there and have time, pick up the little booklet "Historic Ritzville, a Walking Tour" from one of the downtown businesses.

http://home.comcast.net/~jdwain/63.63.jpg
Dwain G.

studeclunker
11-14-2006, 12:54 PM
Thank you for the encouraging news, Scott. One of the main things that do the most damage, in four season areas, is lack of environmental maintenance in old buildings. When one shuts all the systems off, everything goes to hell in a handbasket very quickly.

Dwain, which parapet are you talking about? I can see several large marquees across the intersection from that tower on the right. Then again there's the black and gold ones on the left foreground, but then you said background, so I'm confused. I don't blame you for stopping there so often. It looks like a really neat town.

Another town that did a nice job with it's old main street is Yuba City California. I would recommend a lesurely drive, north of Sacramento, down Hwy 99 and especially Hwy 70 through Marysville (scooting across the river to Yuba City), and Oroville. Then back to 99 after Oroville, through the college town of Chico, through Vina (pronounced Veen-ya), Los Molinos (Low-sse Moe-lee-noss), Dairyville and finally Red Bluff. Most of the small towns haven't changed much in the last fifty years. It's mostly farm land and just a spectacular drive in mid to late spring. The return trip could be taken down I-5 and several fun stops are to be had on that modern byway. Corning is the self-proclaimed capital of the olive growing industry in the western US. There is also a world renound glass blower there. Many of these small towns, along this loop, are painfully aware of the value of their historic districts. They lack the resources to do much, but at least they try.

http://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b18/Studeclunker/studebaby/54wagonblue-2.jpghttp://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b18/Studeclunker/studebaby/red54wagon-1.jpg
Lotsa Larks!
K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
Ron Smith

studeclunker
11-14-2006, 12:54 PM
Thank you for the encouraging news, Scott. One of the main things that do the most damage, in four season areas, is lack of environmental maintenance in old buildings. When one shuts all the systems off, everything goes to hell in a handbasket very quickly.

Dwain, which parapet are you talking about? I can see several large marquees across the intersection from that tower on the right. Then again there's the black and gold ones on the left foreground, but then you said background, so I'm confused. I don't blame you for stopping there so often. It looks like a really neat town.

Another town that did a nice job with it's old main street is Yuba City California. I would recommend a lesurely drive, north of Sacramento, down Hwy 99 and especially Hwy 70 through Marysville (scooting across the river to Yuba City), and Oroville. Then back to 99 after Oroville, through the college town of Chico, through Vina (pronounced Veen-ya), Los Molinos (Low-sse Moe-lee-noss), Dairyville and finally Red Bluff. Most of the small towns haven't changed much in the last fifty years. It's mostly farm land and just a spectacular drive in mid to late spring. The return trip could be taken down I-5 and several fun stops are to be had on that modern byway. Corning is the self-proclaimed capital of the olive growing industry in the western US. There is also a world renound glass blower there. Many of these small towns, along this loop, are painfully aware of the value of their historic districts. They lack the resources to do much, but at least they try.

http://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b18/Studeclunker/studebaby/54wagonblue-2.jpghttp://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b18/Studeclunker/studebaby/red54wagon-1.jpg
Lotsa Larks!
K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
Ron Smith

8E45E
11-14-2006, 01:08 PM
[quote]Originally posted by studeclunker

[font=Comic Sans MS]Thank you for the encouraging news, Scott. One of the main things that do the most damage, in four season areas, is lack of environmental maintenance in old buildings. When one shuts all the systems off, everything goes to hell in a handbasket very quickly.


You can be assured of that!! Check out www.dixiesquare.com...don't know what cause more damage to this abandoned shopping mall; the vandals or the elements!

Craig.

8E45E
11-14-2006, 01:08 PM
[quote]Originally posted by studeclunker

[font=Comic Sans MS]Thank you for the encouraging news, Scott. One of the main things that do the most damage, in four season areas, is lack of environmental maintenance in old buildings. When one shuts all the systems off, everything goes to hell in a handbasket very quickly.


You can be assured of that!! Check out www.dixiesquare.com...don't know what cause more damage to this abandoned shopping mall; the vandals or the elements!

Craig.

Scott
11-14-2006, 01:27 PM
I forgot to mention that I learned there is a good chance that tours will be organized of the administration build at next year's meet.

Scott
11-14-2006, 01:27 PM
I forgot to mention that I learned there is a good chance that tours will be organized of the administration build at next year's meet.

Dwain G.
11-14-2006, 01:52 PM
Behind the 'Division St.' sign. Sorry, I should have called it a turret. Here's a different view:
http://home.comcast.net/~jdwain/ritz.jpg

(There's a couple Studes in this town too).
_____________________________________________________

Dwain, which parapet are you talking about? I can see several large marquees across the intersection from that tower on the right. Then again there's the black and gold ones on the left foreground, but then you said background, so I'm confused. I don't blame you for stopping there so often. It looks like a really neat town.



http://home.comcast.net/~jdwain/63.63.jpg
Dwain G.

Dwain G.
11-14-2006, 01:52 PM
Behind the 'Division St.' sign. Sorry, I should have called it a turret. Here's a different view:
http://home.comcast.net/~jdwain/ritz.jpg

(There's a couple Studes in this town too).
_____________________________________________________

Dwain, which parapet are you talking about? I can see several large marquees across the intersection from that tower on the right. Then again there's the black and gold ones on the left foreground, but then you said background, so I'm confused. I don't blame you for stopping there so often. It looks like a really neat town.



http://home.comcast.net/~jdwain/63.63.jpg
Dwain G.

prager
11-15-2006, 08:58 AM
Hello all! I work at the public works across the street from the ad building. The school corp still has items in the building, and the heat is still on...not too high;). A friend of mine is the Maintenance director for the corp. I will inquire again if he has any new news, but at last inquiry, the word on the street had it that the city gets it back , and after one year of having it back with no action, the building reverts back to the school corp, and poissibly demoed. I would think that the city would not pay to demo if they can have the school corp foot the bill..we'll see..

Still working to restore my 62 Lark in South Bend, Indiana

prager
11-15-2006, 08:58 AM
Hello all! I work at the public works across the street from the ad building. The school corp still has items in the building, and the heat is still on...not too high;). A friend of mine is the Maintenance director for the corp. I will inquire again if he has any new news, but at last inquiry, the word on the street had it that the city gets it back , and after one year of having it back with no action, the building reverts back to the school corp, and poissibly demoed. I would think that the city would not pay to demo if they can have the school corp foot the bill..we'll see..

Still working to restore my 62 Lark in South Bend, Indiana

JBOYLE
11-15-2006, 10:35 AM
As an examle of what can be done, in Indianapolis a developer has saved the old Stutz factory and turned it into retail/office/artist spaces. I believe it has gone over so well that he's expanding into an adjecent old Stutz building.
Heck, he even owns a copule of Stutz cars and has joined the Stutz Club.
The only trouble I can see is that I'd guess that South Bend is not Indianapolis in terms of money or need of space. Still someone might want to look at the Stutz project for ideas or as a business model.

63 Avanti R1 2788
1914 Stutz Bearcat
(George Barris replica)

Washington State

JBOYLE
11-15-2006, 10:35 AM
As an examle of what can be done, in Indianapolis a developer has saved the old Stutz factory and turned it into retail/office/artist spaces. I believe it has gone over so well that he's expanding into an adjecent old Stutz building.
Heck, he even owns a copule of Stutz cars and has joined the Stutz Club.
The only trouble I can see is that I'd guess that South Bend is not Indianapolis in terms of money or need of space. Still someone might want to look at the Stutz project for ideas or as a business model.

63 Avanti R1 2788
1914 Stutz Bearcat
(George Barris replica)

Washington State