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lstude
11-06-2006, 07:37 AM
I think this might have been discussed before, but I couldn't find it. Before installing the S-10 rear end in my 52 Commander, I was just going to replace the rear spring bushings. Well, I couldn't even get the bolts out. I didn't have time to keep trying so I just installed the rear, but at some point, I need to change those bushings. Is there an easy way?

Leonard Shepherd, editor, The Commanding Leader, Central Virginia Chapter, http://centralvirginiachapter.org/
http://i99.photobucket.com/albums/l288/lstude/Mein64Daytonasm.jpghttp://i99.photobucket.com/albums/l288/lstude/52inyardsm-1.jpg

showbizkid
11-06-2006, 10:30 AM
Leonard, check out this page:

http://www.studebaker-info.org/rearbush.html

It's devoted to nothing but removing those bushings! Just be patient :)


[img=left]http://members.cox.net/clarknovak/lark.gif[/img=left]

Clark in San Diego
'63 F2/Lark Standard
http://studeblogger.blogspot.com

lstude
11-06-2006, 12:54 PM
Thanks for the info, Clark, but I asked for an EASY way! :D Just kidding!

Leonard Shepherd, editor, The Commanding Leader, Central Virginia Chapter, http://centralvirginiachapter.org/
http://i99.photobucket.com/albums/l288/lstude/Mein64Daytonasm.jpghttp://i99.photobucket.com/albums/l288/lstude/52inyardsm-1.jpg

Bills R2
11-06-2006, 08:43 PM
Harbor freight sell a tool to press out the old bushings and press in the new ones.It is of course "imported" but for the little you are likely to use it,it will be money well spent!

'64 R2 back on da road again
POCI,SCCA,SIMTA

53k
11-06-2006, 09:17 PM
quote:Originally posted by lstude

Thanks for the info, Clark, but I asked for an EASY way! :D Just kidding!

Leonard,
You have asked the wrong question. There is NO easy way. I recently took two days (and five Sawz-All blades) just to change the lower rear bushings.

[img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/64%20Daytona%20Convertible/Copy%20of%20DaytonaConvert7-20-06.JPG[/img=right]

Paul Johnson
'53 Commander Starliner (since 1966)
'64 Daytona Wagonaire (original owner)
'64 Daytona Convertible (2006)
Museum R-4 engine

garyash
11-06-2006, 09:36 PM
I'll second the opinion that there is no easy way. I tried the "pull it out with threaded rod" technique - no go! You probably need to use an air chisel to split the bushing shells and drive them out - after you melt out the rubber with a propane torch. Of course, you need to remove the fuel tank to do this - and the rubber will burn, so have some water and a sponge handy! A previous post on the forum here suggested [u]tightening</u> the shackle bolts first to break the rust bond between the bolts and the inner sleeves. Even if you get the bolts and the rubber out, the outer sleeves are probably stuck by rust. You need to cut through the sleeve to release the pressure, then drive them out with the air chisel. Be prepared for hours of nasty work. Coat the new outer bushing shells with copper grease before you pull them in with the threaded rod technique.

[img=left]http://www.studegarage.com/images/gary_ash_m5_sm.jpg[/img=left] Gary Ash
Dartmouth, Mass.
'48 M5
'65 Wagonaire Commander
'63 Wagonaire Standard
web site at http://www.studegarage.com

55Commander
11-06-2006, 11:03 PM
I did the threaded rod, nuts, washers, sockets of various sizes and
it was a real pain. The worst is the ones in the frame because the
body gets in the way of the threaded rod. Putting the new ones in
was a piece of cake.

Just don't give up once you start.

lstude
11-07-2006, 12:19 PM
Thanks for all the help guys! At least I know what I am getting myself into!

Leonard Shepherd, editor, The Commanding Leader, Central Virginia Chapter, http://centralvirginiachapter.org/
http://i99.photobucket.com/albums/l288/lstude/Mein64Daytonasm.jpghttp://i99.photobucket.com/albums/l288/lstude/52inyardsm-1.jpg

Rosstude
11-07-2006, 12:51 PM
The upper ones in the frame have proven to be a real pain for me. I have used a quick release skewer from a bicycle along with various washers, and sockets, to pull the old ones out. The quick releases can be had pretty cheap, and exert a tremendous amount of force, abate only 1/8" at a time.

Ross.
Riverside, Ca.
1957 Provincial X2
1958 Transtar
1963 Lark. F.S.

53k
08-25-2007, 04:43 PM
Some time back I bought a set of NOS HD rear springs for my Wagonaire. It had the original six-leaf HD springs (aka cop car springs) still on it, but with 130,000 miles and 43 years, I figured they were tired. A couple weeks ago I decided to tackle the replacement job. I put the car on stands, crawled under, put a couple wrenches on the frozen front bolt and decided "not for me"[:I]. So I took the car to a nearby spring shop (in business with the same family ownership since 1945). They changed them for me. I was suprised that the car didn't seem to sit any higher than before and I was surprised how good the old front bushings looked (the rears didn't look so good though:).
http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Spring%20bushing%20work%20for%20Forum%20post/Copy%20of%20old%20large%20bushing.jpghttp://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Spring%20bushing%20work%20for%20Forum%20post/Copy%20of%20old%20rear%20spring%20rear%20bushing.jpg

A couple days ago I decided to put new bushings in the old springs so I could put them on my convertible. The original four-leaf springs were obviously sagging. I knid of knew what to expect in getting out the old bushings (from this and other threads and some Bob Johnstone advice). The big bushings weren't too bad. I drilled out the rubber with a 1/4" bit and knocked out the center parts. I then used my Sawzall to cut the outer shell almost to the spring. Then I used a cold chisel to peel them out. The smaller rears were another story. The centers came out easily because because there was little rubber in them. However, I had a heck of a time peeling out the outer shells. I even dulled my cold chisel and sometime I'll learn how to hold a hammer (strong language followed).
http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Spring%20bushing%20work%20for%20Forum%20post/Copy%20of%20learn%20to%20hammer.jpg
To install the new bushings I painted the inside of the spring with never-seize then used a combination of 1/2"-drive sockets and a large carpentry clamp to squeeze the bushing in place. For the rears I used a combination of a long carriage bolt, a couple more 1/2" drive sockets and a 9/16" wrench and/or socket.

http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Spring%20bushing%20work%20for%20Forum%20post/Copy%20of%20tool%20to%20install%20large%20spring%20bushing.jpghttp://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Spring%20bushing%20work%20for%20Forum%20post/Copy%20of%20tool%20to%20install%20small%20bushing%202.jpg

Here are the completed springs.
http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Spring%20bushing%20work%20for%20Forum%20post/Copy%20of%20rebushed%20springs.jpg



[img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/R-4.JPG[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/64L.JPG[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/64P.jpg[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/53K.jpg[/img=right]Paul Johnson
'53 Commander Starliner (since 1966)
'64 Daytona Wagonaire (original owner)
'64 Daytona Convertible (2006)
Museum R-4 engine

studebakerkid
08-26-2007, 04:46 AM
I used the burn out methor on a few of my rigs but I have had to drill the bushings out in the frame and once you do that stock will not fit but then I did not use stock instead I had nylon bushings made so I will not have to ever replace them again.

If you car is ugly then it better be fast.....

65 2dr sedan
64 2dr sedan (Pinkie)
61 V8 Tcab
61 Tcab 20R powered
55 Commander Wagon
54 Champion Wagon
46 Gibson Model A
50 JD MC

52 Ragtop
08-26-2007, 08:57 AM
Studebaker had a tool to do this, I used on on the frame busings on my 52 ragtop, I did have the rear fenders off when I did it, but with the tool, it was easy. I borrowed the tool but, don't remember who from &lt;G&gt;

Jim

53k
09-18-2007, 10:44 PM
I have decided that I REALLY hate spring bushings. A few days ago I decided to go ahead and install the six-leaf springs on my convertible. Surprisingly, all the bolts on the old springs came out with no problem. Earlier I had to cut off the bolts on the lower rear bushings when I replaced them, but I guess the others were more protected (plus it was a California car most of its life). Flushed with success I decided to replace the upper rear bushings- BIG MISTAKE. I have decided that you can't get them out without (1) removing the rear fender, or (2) removing the gas tank, or (3) removing both. On the left I burned out the rubber and got the center out ok. I couldn't get a saw in the inside of the outer shell so I tried an air chisel- no joy, just chewed up the entire area because I just couldn't get a straight shot at it. I tried a cold chisel- same result. I bought a new die grinder a real Dremel (my Harbor Freight special started spitting pieces out the vents the third time I used it). I wanted to use router bits to notch the shell so I could peel it out. I just broke my bits. Then I tried pulling it from the inside using a 16 mm socket as the driver and a 1/2" bolt as the puller. I turned the nut with a breaker bar and found why they call them breaker bars- the 1/2" bolt sheared. So, the car is sitting down in my barn on jack stands. I don't have time to drop the tank before this weekend when I am leading a Fall Tour, so I guess I'll be driving the Brand "A"[V][V].

[img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/R-4.JPG[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/64L.JPG[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/64P.jpg[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/53K.jpg[/img=right]Paul Johnson
'53 Commander Starliner (since 1966)
'64 Daytona Wagonaire (original owner)
'64 Daytona Convertible (2006)
Museum R-4 engine

farmhawk
09-18-2007, 10:53 PM
I guess I should feel fortunate! After my Hawk sat in a Montana wheat field for 35 years I had mine changed out in an easy afternoon using the directions supplied by studebakerparts.com.

Wayen K.
Libby, MT
61 Hawk (Project)
48 Diamond T 306H (Waiting)

gordr
09-18-2007, 11:14 PM
With the smaller bushings, I'm wondering what would happen if you ran a coarse-thread tap through the bushing, a tap whose major diameter was JUST less than the O.D. of the bushing?

If you were able to cut a thread in the bushing shell, you could either screw in a bolt of the right size and use that to pull the bushing, or else simply grab an end, and peel it out spiral fashion. It's something I will have to try when I get home.

Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

Mark57
09-18-2007, 11:44 PM
quote:Originally posted by gordr

If you were able to cut a thread in the bushing shell, you could either screw in a bolt of the right size and use that to pull the bushing, or else simply grab an end, and peel it out spiral fashion. It's something I will have to try when I get home.

Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands


Gord - Sorry you did not make the Zone Meet in Penticton:(... maybe Oregon next summer?[?][^]

<h5>Mark
'57 Transtar
3E-6/7-122 </h5>
http://i186.photobucket.com/albums/x153/MarkH57/Mr.GreenJeans1002b.jpg

53k
09-28-2007, 09:54 PM
quote:Originally posted by gordr

With the smaller bushings, I'm wondering what would happen if you ran a coarse-thread tap through the bushing, a tap whose major diameter was JUST less than the O.D. of the bushing?
If you were able to cut a thread in the bushing shell, you could either screw in a bolt of the right size and use that to pull the bushing, or else simply grab an end, and peel it out spiral fashion. It's something I will have to try when I get home.

That's an interesting idea. I thought about trying it, but didn't have a big enough tap.
Anyhow, today I finally succeeded in getting the old bushing shell out and a new one pressed in. I gave up and took off the gas tank (see my post on makeshift gas tank jack). With the tank out of the way I had a straight shot at it. I used my Makita reciprocating saw and notched the bushing shell along the bottom (then the top too for good measure). I took a small cold chisel and started to peel up the old shell, but it was going pretty slow so I fired up the compressor and used my air hammer muffler tool to peel it some more. That kind of slowed down to so, remembering Bob Johnstone's advice to used a pointed chisel, I installed one in the air hammer and hit it again- popped it right out. You can see in the following pix that I had the hole pretty boogered up.
http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Spring%20bushing%20work%20for%20Forum%20post/Copy%20of%20gas%20tank%20removal%20010.jpghttp://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Spring%20bushing%20work%20for%20Forum%20post/Copy%20of%20gas%20tank%20removal%20008.jpg

After using my Dremel with a grinder tool to smooth out the rough places inside the hole in the frame, I used my combination of bolts, washers, sockets and wrenches to pull the new bushing in place.

http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Spring%20bushing%20work%20for%20Forum%20post/Copy%20of%20gas%20tank%20removal%20014.jpghttp://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Spring%20bushing%20work%20for%20Forum%20post/Copy%20of%20gas%20tank%20removal%20015.jpg
http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Spring%20bushing%20work%20for%20Forum%20post/Copy%20of%20gas%20tank%20removal%20016.jpghttp://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Spring%20bushing%20work%20for%20Forum%20post/Copy%20of%20gas%20tank%20removal%20017.jpg

[img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/R-4.JPG[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/64L.JPG[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/64P.jpg[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/53K.jpg[/img=right]Paul Johnson
'53 Commander Starliner (since 1966)
'64 Daytona Wagonaire (original owner)
'64 Daytona Convertible (2006)
Museum R-4 engine

garyash
09-28-2007, 10:58 PM
Paul, I feel much better now that I have seen your pictures and read the story. You have clearly demonstrated that my frustration with spring bushings was not unique. I had even cut off the bottoms of the inner and outer rear quarters of the '63 Wagonaire since they were rusted out anyway and it still wasn't any easier.
http://www.studegarage.com/images/63wagon/rearqtr_shackle1s.jpg
You also effectively demonstrated that all significant projects require a blood sacrifice! I hope you have recovered and can now move on to the next phase of your project.

[img=left]http://www.studegarage.com/images/gary_ash_m5_sm.jpg[/img=left] Gary Ash
Dartmouth, Mass.
'48 M5
'65 Wagonaire Commander
'63 Wagonaire Standard
web site at http://www.studegarage.com

leyrret
09-29-2007, 06:12 AM
After burning rubber out I split the shell with a aceteylene torch with a small tip and low flame. It melts shell. You might not want to
try this if you inexperienced with a torch.

63Avanti
09-29-2007, 03:28 PM
1. get a 3 dollar cutting wheel for your drill, and cut away. (USE GOGGLES)
2. put in a drill bit in that drill, a little narrower than the "cruddy rubber". Drill lots of holes in the cruddy rubber. put in your favorite water-displacement lubricant. let soak for a few hours, then elevate and wack! with a 3 pound hammer.

every other method was too much effort for me!


quote:Originally posted by lstude

I think this might have been discussed before, but I couldn't find it. Before installing the S-10 rear end in my 52 Commander, I was just going to replace the rear spring bushings. Well, I couldn't even get the bolts out. I didn't have time to keep trying so I just installed the rear, but at some point, I need to change those bushings. Is there an easy way?

Leonard Shepherd, editor, The Commanding Leader, Central Virginia Chapter, http://centralvirginiachapter.org/
http://i99.photobucket.com/albums/l288/lstude/Mein64Daytonasm.jpghttp://i99.photobucket.com/albums/l288/lstude/52inyardsm-1.jpg



Terry, North Texas
1963 Avanti R2, 63SR1065
(in stage 1 resto "Project A")
http://sterkel.org/avanti
1985 Kubota L2202(Diesel)
1999 Toyota rice burner
1986 Ford 150 Long Bed

53k
10-12-2007, 10:47 PM
And the spring bushing agony goes on.
I drove the convertible around the "block" yesterday for the first time since finishing the bushing/spring work. The ride and handling is significantly improved. Even with the original standard front springs, the spacers seemed to have really tightened them and the ancient NOS Gabriels, set on firm, seem to snub the rebound much better than the unknown vintage gas shocks that were on the front. However, the annoying rattle I haven't been able to find somewhere in the right rear was still there and it was joined by a metallic squeak. So, today I jacked it up again and looked closely with a bright light. I noticed that the outboard shackle was very close to the frame and appeared to have rubbed it. Looking further I found I should have replaced the upper bushing anyhow. I had decided that it was passable and didn't replace it because of the struggle on the other side. The problem is, the inner shell (that the bolt goes through) is separated from the rubber which allows the rear end of the spring to slide back and forth at the top.
So, here we go again. At least I should have some learning curve benefit from the first experience.


[img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/R-4.JPG[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/64L.JPG[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/64P.jpg[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/53K.jpg[/img=right]Paul Johnson
'53 Commander Starliner (since 1966)
'64 Daytona Wagonaire (original owner)
'64 Daytona Convertible (2006)
Museum R-4 engine

53k
10-27-2007, 10:41 PM
quote:Originally posted by 53k

And the spring bushing agony goes on.
I drove the convertible around the "block" yesterday for the first time since finishing the bushing/spring work. The ride and handling is significantly improved. Even with the original standard front springs, the spacers seemed to have really tightened them and the ancient NOS Gabriels, set on firm, seem to snub the rebound much better than the unknown vintage gas shocks that were on the front. However, the annoying rattle I haven't been able to find somewhere in the right rear was still there and it was joined by a metallic squeak. So, today I jacked it up again and looked closely with a bright light. I noticed that the outboard shackle was very close to the frame and appeared to have rubbed it. Looking further I found I should have replaced the upper bushing anyhow. I had decided that it was passable and didn't replace it because of the struggle on the other side. The problem is, the inner shell (that the bolt goes through) is separated from the rubber which allows the rear end of the spring to slide back and forth at the top.
So, here we go again. At least I should have some learning curve benefit from the first experience.

Today I finally got back to installing this last bushing. It went pretty well with some benefit from the learning curve. I had a little more trouble with the gas tank this time, but it had probably 12 gallons of gas in it. After burning out the rubber with a propane torch (fire extingusher and hose standing by- don't like open flame in an old wooden barn), I knocked out the center then notched the outer shell with my reciprocating saw. I used a small cold chisle to start peeling the shell from the frame, but gave up and got my compressor and air chisel to finish the job (took about three seconds). After de-burring the hole in the frame I pulled the new bushing through with no problems, hooked up the spring and re-installed the gas tank.
I can't wait to drive it to see if that FINALLY solved my annoying rattle in the right rear (too wet today to take it out of the barn and up a grassy hill). In the "before" pix below you can see where the shackle was rubbing on the frame, so I'm "cautiously optimistic".
Worst problem I had was getting the melted rubber on my skin and in my hair. Hand cleaner wouldn't touch it. I finally tried using WD-40 and it did take it off. I had my wife wetting paper towels with WD-40 and wiping the goop out of my hair and off my scalp[:I].
http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Spring%20bushing%20work%20for%20Forum%20post/Copy%20of%20Last%20bushing%20008.jpghttp://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Spring%20bushing%20work%20for%20Forum%20post/Copy%20of%20Last%20bushing%20016.jpg

[img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/R-4.JPG[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/64L.JPG[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/64P.jpg[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/53K.jpg[/img=right]Paul Johnson
'53 Commander Starliner (since 1966)
'64 Daytona Wagonaire (original owner)
'64 Daytona Convertible (2006)
Museum R-4 engine

JDP
10-27-2007, 11:18 PM
Would now be a bad time to mention the only thing that slowed me down on the bushing job on my dry climate R2 GT was adding spacers to pull the new bushing in.:) (took 1/2hour/bushing) BTW, (I have done the other kind, not much fun)

JDP/Maryland
64 R2 GT cost to date
$$60,984.29
63 R2 SuperHawk
63 Lark 2 door
54 Starlight
52 Starliner
51 Commander
39 Coupe express
39 Coupe express (rod)

53k
10-28-2007, 11:48 AM
quote:Originally posted by JDP

Would now be a bad time to mention the only thing that slowed me down on the bushing job on my dry climate R2 GT was adding spacers to pull the new bushing in.:) (took 1/2hour/bushing) BTW, (I have done the other kind, not much fun)

I wonder if they had been replaced before and lubed when installed. My car was a California and Texas car with no rust ever anywhere, but the bushings were stuck as bad as any. I painted the holes in the frame and springs with Never-Seize when I installed the new bushings.


[img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/R-4.JPG[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/64L.JPG[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/64P.jpg[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/53K.jpg[/img=right]Paul Johnson
'53 Commander Starliner (since 1966)
'64 Daytona Wagonaire (original owner)
'64 Daytona Convertible (2006)
Museum R-4 engine

JDP
10-28-2007, 04:21 PM
I can not tell a lie, there were hints of Never seize in the bore and they came out like butter.

JDP/Maryland
64 R2 GT cost to date
$$60,984.29
63 R2 SuperHawk
63 Lark 2 door
54 Starlight
52 Starliner
51 Commander
39 Coupe express
39 Coupe express (rod)

Lark Parker
10-28-2007, 06:29 PM
No problem here.
I just use a laser spiral ream cutter with a resonant harmonic frequency cylinder-extractor attachment.


http://s108.photobucket.com/albums/n4/larkparker/th_caryreduced.jpgIf at first you don't succeed -- you will get a lot of advice. Lark Parker

53k
10-28-2007, 06:40 PM
quote:Originally posted by JDP

I can not tell a lie, there were hints of Never seize in the bore and they came out like butter.

:D:D:D

[img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/R-4.JPG[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/64L.JPG[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/64P.jpg[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/53K.jpg[/img=right]Paul Johnson
'53 Commander Starliner (since 1966)
'64 Daytona Wagonaire (original owner)
'64 Daytona Convertible (2006)
Museum R-4 engine

showbizkid
10-28-2007, 07:02 PM
quote:Originally posted by Lark Parker

No problem here.
I just use a laser spiral ream cutter with a resonant harmonic frequency cylinder-extractor attachment.


So, do you think of these on-the-fly or do you have a bunch in the can, ready to go? ;):D Either way, I'm impressed!


[img=left]http://members.cox.net/clarknovak/lark.gif[/img=left]

Clark in San Diego
'63 F2/Lark Standard
http://studeblogger.blogspot.com
www.studebakersandiego.com

mbstude
10-28-2007, 07:06 PM
quote:So, do you think of these on-the-fly

Clark, meet Lark Parker. :)

Matthew Burnette
'59 Scotsman
'63 Daytona
Hazlehurst, GA

http://i81.photobucket.com/albums/j209/mbstude/siggy_pic.jpg

Lark Parker
10-28-2007, 08:39 PM
quote:
So, do you think of these on-the-fly or do you have a bunch in the can, ready to go? ;):D Either way, I'm impressed!


Clark in San Diego


There's no use in soft soaping me. I don't loan out tools.


http://s108.photobucket.com/albums/n4/larkparker/th_caryreduced.jpgIf at first you don't succeed -- you will get a lot of advice. Lark Parker

53k
10-29-2007, 11:26 AM
quote:Originally posted by 53k
....I can't wait to drive it to see if that FINALLY solved my annoying rattle in the right rear (too wet today to take it out of the barn and up a grassy hill). In the "before" pix below you can see where the shackle was rubbing on the frame, so I'm "cautiously optimistic"....
Well, took the convert for a ride yesterday- only partial joy. The bad noise from the shackle hitting the frame is gone, but I still have an annoying rattle somewhere in the right rear. I have suspected exhaust pipe rattles, but could never make any part of the pipe hit anything when I'm on my back under the car. Maybe when I'm driving there is enough motion allowed by the motor mounts and the the tranny mount... I need to replace the exhaust anyhow. What's on there now is a muffler shop job- everything welded, wrong hangers, etc. So, Don Simmons, stand by for a call.


[img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/R-4.JPG[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/64L.JPG[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/64P.jpg[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/53K.jpg[/img=right]Paul Johnson
'53 Commander Starliner (since 1966)
'64 Daytona Wagonaire (original owner)
'64 Daytona Convertible (2006)
Museum R-4 engine

mapman
01-11-2008, 02:29 PM
This hasn't been discussed for a while so I thought you might need an easy 5 minute solution.
http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s303/dudley-jr/100_2614.jpg
clamp it
http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s303/dudley-jr/100_2615.jpg
grind a little
http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s303/dudley-jr/100_2616.jpg
all done, ready to install in a new spring

Orestudeguy
01-11-2008, 03:06 PM
LOL!!!!

Oh yeah..

George
Grants Pass, Oregon
65 Commander 2door
64 Wagonaire's (1 parts car, 1 Canadian fixed roof disc brake car, the other sliding roof South Bend car.)
63 Champ
63 GT Hawk
51 Champion Starlight Coupe
http://i256.photobucket.com/albums/hh183/orestudeguy/58Commander.jpg

Tom B
01-11-2008, 08:12 PM
Am I missing something here? I just got through disassembling the springs (both ends) on my 55 President State sedan. While the ends of the rubber are a little weathered, the rubber is sound and resilient. I'm not about to sweat blood to remove what appear to be perfectly good bushings. If they were worn, with the inner sleeve riding on the spring itself, I'd replace them, but otherwise, why? If they are loose, replace them if they are tight, leave 'em. Of course, the new rear springs will come with new bushings, none of the others will be changed.


[img=left]http://www.alink.com/personal/tbredehoft/Bothcars4.jpg[/img=left]
Tom Bredehoft
'53 Commander Coupe
'55 President State Sedan (Under Construction) 99.5 hrs.
'05 Legacy Ltd Wagon
All Indiana built cars

gordr
01-11-2008, 10:55 PM
Doggone it, Mapman. I did a double-take when I looked at those pics. Could have been taken in my shop. I have a very similar roller cabinet and top box, sitting right beside the workbench and vise in the same relative position.

Thanks for the laugh!

Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands