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moose
11-02-2006, 12:43 PM
Just bought a 59 lark with a 318 mopar motor and 904 auto. trans
the problem is the steering has a lot of play and steers very hard
it was a six cylinder before with manuel steering. It still has the manuel steering.Looking for some info to cure this problem. Thanks
Steve. Uncasville Ct. 06382 kst19@ct.metrocast.net[:X]

gordr
11-02-2006, 01:35 PM
quote:Originally posted by moose

Just bought a 59 lark with a 318 mopar motor and 904 auto. trans
the problem is the steering has a lot of play and steers very hard
it was a six cylinder before with manuel steering. It still has the manuel steering.Looking for some info to cure this problem. Thanks
Steve. Uncasville Ct. 06382 kst19@ct.metrocast.net[:X]


Have a helper crank the steering wheel to and fro through the slack area while you watch the the front wheels and steering linkage. I'll bet you find a lot of vertical movement on the end of the steering bellcrank, where the two tie rods attach. This is usually the result of worn bushings on the bellcrank shaft (aka center pivot), but sometimes the pinch bolt that secures the bellcrank to the shaft wiil work loose, and allow for a lot of slop.

There is a fitting to grease this pivot shaft, located in a hole in the back side of the front frame crossmember. Many shops negelect to grease it.

Hard steering is usually a result of lack of grease on the king pins, and especially the king pin thrust bearings, which can be seen as "washers" about 5/8" thick located between the top of the steering knuckle and the flange on the king pin forging. These will often take grease better if the weight of the car is on the ground. Have your helper slowly steer to and fro while you pump grease into each king pin. It may help to use a propane torch to warm the thrust bearing and melt old hardened grease so that the new grease can displace it. NOT red hot, just hot enough that you can't comfortably touch it!

It can take a long time to get lube into neglected king pins, but persistence will pay off. I can't stress too highly how important those kingpin thrust bearings are. They carry ALL the weight of the car's front end. If they are seized, something has to slide, instead of roll on ball bearings as intended.

All parts are available from a number of the Studebaker vendors, too.

Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

moose
11-02-2006, 04:26 PM
Thanks Gord for the info.I will check that out. I also see in the front coil springs that they have them snap in wedges so i think i will have to find some heavier front springs so i can get some of the negative camber out of it. It is my first time on here so i will
be looking for places to get parts for the lark.I was just sick of all the ford and chevys that you see so i thought i would try somthing different. Had a 60 lark in the late 60s with a sbc in it
but that was a long time ago. Thanks Steve

1956 Hawk
11-02-2006, 04:39 PM
Steve, if you haven't already got one you should buy the shop manual for your lark. As far as camber adjustment goes on a Studebaker it only requires an allen wrench.
David

moose
11-02-2006, 04:44 PM
David do you know who sells the manuel? Steve

StudeRich
11-02-2006, 05:16 PM
Hi Steve(Moose); Sorry, not Dave, this is Rich. Welcome to the Studebaker Drivers' Club, if you have not joined, you can do that on our website: studebakerdriversclub.com where you got to this site from.

Most of us on the: http://studebakervendors.com do sell the CD disc and the paper reproduction copies of the Studebaker Chassis Parts Catalog, Body Parts Catalog and Shop Manuals.


quote:Originally posted by moose

David do you know who sells the manuel? Steve


StudeRich
Studebakers Northwest
Ferndale, WA

moose
11-02-2006, 05:43 PM
Thanks Rich for the info. I will be needing a lot of it to get the parts and manuels i will need to get this Lark right. Thanks Steve

John Kirchhoff
11-02-2006, 08:08 PM
Gordr was certainly correct about the needle bearings on the bellcrank shaft possibly being worn. If the steering gearbox itself needs adjusting, you'll get the turn the steering wheel and go no where syndrome. I found the easiest way to determine where the play is at is to try to turn the steering wheel with one finger. If you can rotate the wheel back and forth with your finger, it's the gearbox that needs adjusting but if you can't, follow gordr's suggestion.

bams50
11-02-2006, 09:42 PM
quote:Originally posted by StudeRich



Most of us on the: http://studebakervendors.com do sell the CD disc and the paper reproduction copies of the Studebaker Chassis Parts Catalog, Body Parts Catalog and Shop Manuals.

StudeRich
Studebakers Northwest
Ferndale, WA


Wow, this is the first I've heard of this...[:0] I prefer manuals on CD- just print out pertinent pages and toss 'em if they get dirty!

I'd like to see a price list/order form for any manuals for my 57 Wagon and 60 Lark- where'd I get these?

Robert K. Andrews Owner- IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
Parish, central NY 13131
http://www.cardomain.com/ride/2358680/1

StudeRich
11-02-2006, 10:25 PM
Bob (Bams50); you can contact me offline for those if you like. the 1956 to 1958 CD has all 3 books complete for $19.90 and the 1959-64 set of 3 is $24.90 & includes many more pages. As I said, most of us sell em, they're great! :D
Actually the Parts Catalogs are more usefull for assembly help in my opinion than the Shop Manuals![:0]
Rich.

StudeRich
Studebakers Northwest
Ferndale, WA

64R1
11-03-2006, 02:09 AM
After you have got the front suspension and steering OK and it still steers heavy. You can install a steering box from a 61 to 66 Lark made by Saginaw. It is a far better unit than the Ross you have now. I did that on my 59 wagon 6 to 259 V8 conversion and it made a huge difference. 65R1

moose
11-03-2006, 08:44 AM
Thanks John for that info you gave me will check it out.
65r1 you say the saginaw steering box is a lot better? Is the box a
easy change over or do you have to change things also when you put the v-8 in did you have to change the front coil springs? Do you know
the best place to locate Lark parts? Thanks

StudeRich
11-03-2006, 12:24 PM
Yes Steve; when putting a Stude V-8 in, you definetely need the much heavier V-8 front coil springs as in 64 or 65R1's case. With the Mopar I would think, it is also heavier than a "6" and also needs them.

A lot of guys who have the SBC (Chev) conversion have ordered shortened coils or cut them to lower the car, especially the Coupes & Hardtops and Hawks with long wheelbase. They would have the same "rake" with collapsed "6" cyl. springs, but they don't want them bottoming out!:(
Rich.

StudeRich
Studebakers Northwest
Ferndale, WA