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View Full Version : Pedal Stops and Heater Motor - 53 R5



RitchQ
10-27-2006, 03:37 PM
Thought I would gang my questions up...
1) as stupid as it may seem, I cannot figure out the rectangular rubber pads that fit over the brake and clutch pedal arms. The must go under the panel at the floor but what keeps them tight against the firewall?
2) anyone know the exchange number for a heater blower motor for a 12 V system that will work in the truck? My truck was converted to 12V and I just noticed the fan motor is 6V - that may not be a huge problem but I'm afraid it will burn it out.

Any ideas?
Ritch

Skip Lackie
10-27-2006, 05:12 PM
The soft rubber insulator pads just ride on the pedal arms and don't contact the floorboard until the pedals return to their "up" position. Unscrew the pedal pads and then slide the rubber insulators on the arms. You gotta squeeze them around a bit to get them through the holes in the floor.

The trucks were converted to 12 volts in 1956, though the rest of the heater assembly remained otherwise unchanged. The 12v fan motor is part number 1685816, available for $95 from SASCO. It's probably a common motor and might be available for less money from some other source, but I don't know what the manufacturer's number might be.
Skip Lackie

Roscomacaw
10-27-2006, 06:59 PM
I don't know, Skip... There were THREE different Climatizer setups offered from 49 thru 55 (6volt systems) They all show different part numbers for the blower motors, so I doubt they're all gonna happily accept that 12volt motor you mentioned. They MIGHT - as I've never physically compared them, but I'd be hesitant in recommending the 12 volt that SASCO lists UNLESS we knew for sure that Ritch has the "Type C" Climatizer where the blower motor mounts to the inner fender and feeds air to the heater box thru a 4" flex hose.;)

Miscreant adrift in
the BerStuda Triangle!!

1957 Transtar 1/2ton
1960 Larkvertible V8
1958 Provincial wagon
1953 Commander coupe

RitchQ
10-28-2006, 12:39 AM
Thanks for the info Skip. It seemed so obvious when I ordered them but when they go on it didn't look right. So that means that when you push the pedal down the insulator pads move away from the firewall and would let water, air, dirt in? I would have thought there was some other clip or something that would hold them against the firewall to really insulate...
As for the blower motor -- my truck apparently was modified at some point. I don't have a climatizer under the hood. I have a small unit that sits inside the cab under the dash. So, I may have to just take the motor out and go to the parts store to see what they have in a 12V version....
Thanks for the replies.
Ritch:D[:p]

Skip Lackie
10-28-2006, 10:34 AM
quote:Originally posted by Mr.Biggs

I don't know, Skip... There were THREE different Climatizer setups offered from 49 thru 55 (6volt systems) They all show different part numbers for the blower motors, so I doubt they're all gonna happily accept that 12volt motor you mentioned. They MIGHT - as I've never physically compared them, but I'd be hesitant in recommending the 12 volt that SASCO lists UNLESS we knew for sure that Ritch has the "Type C" Climatizer where the blower motor mounts to the inner fender and feeds air to the heater box thru a 4" flex hose.;)

Miscreant adrift in
the BerStuda Triangle!!

1957 Transtar 1/2ton
1960 Larkvertible V8
1958 Provincial wagon
1953 Commander coupe



Since this thread will remain in the archives, we need to clarify that Mr Biggs is correct[:I] -- the number I provided is only certain to fit the Type C truck heater. Since Rich said he had a 1953 truck, I guess I assumed it would have the Type C heater. However, an old 2R truck parts book I have shows that the Type C wasn't introduced until the middle of the 53 model year (the revised pages in the book are dated 3-31-53), so his truck could originally have been equipped with the Type B heater. The books do not specify exactly when Stude changed from one model of heater to another, presumably because a lot of heaters were dealer-installed, and any type of heater could have been installed in any of the 2R, 3R, or E-model trucks.

Thanks Bob.

Skip

Skip Lackie
10-28-2006, 10:56 AM
quote:Originally posted by RitchQ

Thanks for the info Skip. It seemed so obvious when I ordered them but when they go on it didn't look right. So that means that when you push the pedal down the insulator pads move away from the firewall and would let water, air, dirt in?


Yup. Pretty classy, huh?


quote:
I would have thought there was some other clip or something that would hold them against the firewall to really insulate...


Nope. On the other hand, how much of the time do you spend with the pedals pushed down?


quote:
As for the blower motor -- my truck apparently was modified at some point. I don't have a climatizer under the hood. I have a small unit that sits inside the cab under the dash. So, I may have to just take the motor out and go to the parts store to see what they have in a 12V version....


Is there any kind of brand name on the heater? There are a variety of aftermarket heaters made for hot rods, and the 12v motor might be available from the manufacturer. Otherwise, a full-service FLAPS like NAPA should be able to find a replacement motor if you can find a counter person willing to take the time to look through the right catalogs. I would think the critical parameters are the length and diameter of the shaft and the distance between the mounting screws.

Skip

Roscomacaw
10-28-2006, 06:53 PM
I think those rubber pieces are more to keep the pedal arms and stalks from clanging against the metal floorboards than as a means of sealing.

And further on the heater, After 50 years, even amongst factory heater units, who knows what might have been installed along the way? The heater in my Transtar was one scavenged from another Transtar since my truck didn't HAVE a heater when I got it.;)

Ritch, if your heater is a square cube of a thing, chances are it's an Arvin. They should be easy to find a motor for. But as you say, probably easiest to pull it or just the motor and head on down to NAPA.;)

Miscreant adrift in
the BerStuda Triangle!!

1957 Transtar 1/2ton
1960 Larkvertible V8
1958 Provincial wagon
1953 Commander coupe

RitchQ
10-28-2006, 10:02 PM
Yea MrBiggs, it is an Arvin. Rounded on the front with 3 metal flaps you can open or close to let the air out. I suppose from your description that this must be a type B heater....? I couldn't tell if it was original or not. Somewhere along the line someone has done several things to the truck that don't appear to be original althought they seem to work.
Was there a cut off valve in line with the heater? Something that would allow you to shut the water flow off so hot water would not course thru the heater core? My truck doesn't have one so it radiats heat all the time. That won't be a problem for now as its getting colder in Dallas but I need to shut it off during the summertime.

Ritch

Roscomacaw
10-29-2006, 01:17 AM
No, an Arvin isn't a type B (or A). It's just an aftermarket unit that you'd buy and install yourself. The Stude heater setups DID have a water control valve so you could regulate flow. There's one available from NAPA that's actually better than the one Stude used for years. I've got the number of it here on my desk somewhere.
I think I've got an Arvin out in the parts shed as well. It was as you describe but a 12volt. If the motor's any good, that might be good for you.;)

Miscreant adrift in
the BerStuda Triangle!!

1957 Transtar 1/2ton
1960 Larkvertible V8
1958 Provincial wagon
1953 Commander coupe

CHAMP
10-29-2006, 08:33 AM
Why not just put a voltage reducer to the six volt blower motor[?]

GARY H 2DR.SEDAN 48 STUDEBAKER CHAMPION NORTHEAST MD.

Roscomacaw
10-29-2006, 02:29 PM
Because that's a pretty crude approach nowdays. Of course, I guess you could appreciate the heat generated by a big dropping resistor.:D
The other little detail is polarity. Going 12volt, you're likely gonna swap polarity of the ground. Now you're gonna have the heater motor running backwards.[B)] That MAY not be a problem if the only ground for the motor is via an external lead. In that case you could just feed the reduced voltage to the ground lead and ground what used to be the power wire. But, if the motor's made to where it's internally grounded....[}:)]

Miscreant adrift in
the BerStuda Triangle!!

1957 Transtar 1/2ton
1960 Larkvertible V8
1958 Provincial wagon
1953 Commander coupe

CHAMP
10-29-2006, 07:11 PM
I think the six volt would probably run a long time if you kept the switch on low most of the time and if the polarity could be worked out.

GARY H 2DR.SEDAN 48 STUDEBAKER CHAMPION NORTHEAST MD.

CHAMP
10-29-2006, 07:19 PM
Oh BTW I had a 37 chev I converted to 12volt and I had to run it with the switch on low because when I ran it on high it would over-blow the heater to the point the air wouldn't be hot. I didn't have the polarity problem with the Chevy as it was negative ground to start with.

GARY H 2DR.SEDAN 48 STUDEBAKER CHAMPION NORTHEAST MD.

RitchQ
10-29-2006, 08:19 PM
Well I had the motor out of the heater coil to replace the wiring. I have no idea of the polarity but it has 6 Volt stamped on the motor houseing. The motor runs fine and blows air the right way -- I was just worried that I would burn the motor up running higher voltage thru it. My truck doesnt' appear to have any form of previous Climitizer under the hood. AS Mr Biggs states its probably an aftermarket setup. I can live with it especially since the 2 weeks of winter we have here in Dallas ususally isn't very cold anyway..haha..
My entire system has been changed to a negative ground 12 volt so it doesn't seem to have hurt the motor yet -- just luck I guess.

Thanks for all the discussion.

Ritch

Roscomacaw
10-30-2006, 11:19 PM
I'm sure it DOES move air alright. A heck of alot faster than it should. It may last awhile, but I wouldn't count on it.;)

Miscreant adrift in
the BerStuda Triangle!!

1957 Transtar 1/2ton
1960 Larkvertible V8
1958 Provincial wagon
1953 Commander coupe

RitchQ
10-31-2006, 09:10 AM
Got ya Mr Biggs,,,, the speed is higher I suppose. My comment was aimed at the fact that the fan turned the correct direction. My supposition was that if the polarity were reversed on the motor it would spin the wrong way -- - NO?

Anyway, I would like to try your Arvin 12v if you have one available.
Send me the info, cost etc, to ritchq@hotmail.com

Thanks,
Ritch

Jeff_H
10-31-2006, 12:41 PM
In working with the blower and wiper motors for my '53, I found they are not polarity sensitive as far as direction they turn. I had them apart to clean, oil, and replace the rotted cloth wires and I found out they have a field winding in them instead of permanent magnets as found typically in the more modern motors. When you change polarity of the power lead to the motor, it also changes the field winding polarity since its hooked up in parallel with the motor rotor/brushes. Since BOTH the field and the rotor change polarity, the net change is nil to the motor and it goes the same direction either polarity of applied power. If it was a permanent magnet motor, the change in polarity would make it turn the other way since the magnets field direction does not change.

I expect the motors using magnets came about since they probably use less current (no field winding to power) and high strength magnetic materials are available that were not 50 yrs ago.

Jeff in ND

'53 Champion Hardtop