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gordr
05-10-2008, 01:47 AM
What lives? How about a '64 Daytona hardtop, 259 automatic, manual steering, manual drum brakes? About as plain as a V8 Daytona can get, actually.

http://i210.photobucket.com/albums/bb222/gordintrochu/64Daytona/Daytonaprofile.jpg

Got this car in Calgary on Thursday, for a very reasonable dollar. Hauled it home through a storm of mixed rain and snow. Woke up this morning to a bright sunshiny day, and got to work. Rolled it off the trailer, and had a look. Trailer, Daytona, and Suburban were all coated with mud from the nasty roads of the previous night. Got out the pressure washer. Then the dread "might as wells" kicked in. "If I'm going to fire up the pressure washer, might as well give the engine a shot of engine shampoo, and clean it up. Might as well pressure-wash the trunk. Might as well yard out the rotten old carpets, and pressure-wash the floor and see what's left of it. Might as well take the seats out so as to remove the carpets."

So I did all that. Suburban and trailer are clean. So is the Daytona, although the engine compartment needs major detailing. Why do people feel compelled to paint the engine room of a white car rattle-can black? This is the SECOND white Daytona I've acquired with this curious disease.

Wow! The floors are not really all that bad. No actual holes; some rust alright, but it hasn't gone too far. One pretty good hole in the left rear corner of the trunk, but not hard to fix that. This is really a solid car, for an Alberta car.

The "might as wells" haven't finished with me yet. Might as well see if the engine will run. Oops, no fuel pump. But there's a box of parts, and there's an NOS fuel pump. Well, it's an NOS fuel pump alright, but it's downside-up and bass-ackwards to a Stude fuel pump. Nowhere close to working. But the old Carter pump is there. Wash off the grease; work the arm by hand. Hmmm, seems to suck, seems to push. Found a gasket, and bolted it on and plumbed it in. Hooked up a temporary fuel tank, since the original tank, which was in the trunk, I passed on to another local chapter member who needed one.

Went to fill the temporary tank, and oh-oh, no gas in the gas cans, save for a couple of quarts of mix for the weed whacker and chainsaw. I gave the carb a shot of mix, and turned it over (having installed a good battery). No fire. Checked the points with a test light, and no points action. Removed the points, cleaned them with abrasive cloth, and re-installed. Hit the starter, and it ran a few seconds on the prime gas.

I drove to town, got 2 cans filled with gas, and bought some groceries. Came back, made supper, and then resumed work on the Daytona. Put a gallon or two in the temporary tank, and gave it another shot of prime. Hit the starter; it ran a few seconds and quit. Another shot of prime, and it ran, and stayed running, with the fuel pump sucking fuel just fine. In fact, the carb was dribbling fuel. Tightened the bushing on the fuel inlet, and I think that's fixed.

Had to install the drive shaft; former owner had removed it. Replaced the front seats, and topped up the master cylinder. Hit the starter, and it started instantly, no fuss about it. Put it in Drive, and it went ahead. Put it in Reverse, and it went back. Brakes are there, but dodgy. Driveway brakes, no better. Drove it up to the shop door, and aired up the leaky LF tire. Loaded a bunch of scrap wood in the trunk, because my neighbour was having a fire in the firepit, and sent his kids down to invite me up.

I didn't mention that I got no keys with this car. I dug out my box of miscellaneous keys, and wouldn't you know it, the very first Studebaker ignition key I laid hands on fit the ignition switch perfectly. Time to go buy a lottery ticket. I had a little trouble with the trunk lock, but did manage to find a key that works it with a little effort.

Drove it the quarter-mile up the road to the neighbours' place. This car could not get out of its way. Talk about a slug! But the reason is pretty obvious. The muffler is clogged with something. I could hear the his

sals54
05-10-2008, 02:09 AM
What a great find. Good looking floors and engine compartment.
Be CAREFUL taking off that muffler! ! ! You never know what kind of critter may be ready to jump at your throat when you get it out of there.

sals54
http://i296.photobucket.com/albums/mm197/sals54/NewSignature.jpg

bams50
05-10-2008, 05:23 AM
Another good save, Gord!

I never know if most people enjoy posts like this or not, but I do mine to share experiences with my friends here- but mostly because I REALLY enjoy reading others' reports! Yours are always well-written, and I appreciate your efforts to post them.

Yours is one of the names that, when I see it on a post, I take extra notice to see what you wrote... especially when you start a thread[8D]

Thanks again for sharing this[^]



Robert (Bob) Andrews Owner- Studebakeracres- on the IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
Parish, central NY 13131

"Some people live for the rules, I live for exceptions"- 311

"With your Lark you're on your own, free as a bird, alive as a Lark. You've suddenly discovered that happiness is a thing called Larking!"

bams50
05-10-2008, 05:33 AM
On the car- That looks really good! The dash looks remarkably good, and other than the RF the interior panels even look decent! This one looks like it's brakes, exhaust, and fuel tank away mechanically; maybe some seat covers and a JP carpet set and you'd have a driver!

In your fleet, do you have any drivers you plan to put on the road this year?



Robert (Bob) Andrews Owner- Studebakeracres- on the IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
Parish, central NY 13131

"Some people live for the rules, I live for exceptions"- 311

"With your Lark you're on your own, free as a bird, alive as a Lark. You've suddenly discovered that happiness is a thing called Larking!"

Nitram
05-10-2008, 07:43 AM
Originally posted by bams50
I never know if most people enjoy posts like this or not

I thoroughly enjoy reading someones episode like this. I find myself getting caught up in the posting.
Gord you had me a bit worried when you ran for groceries and made supper. thought you wouldn't find your way back to the shop. You had me on the edge of my seat as to whether she was going to run or not.

Great read Gord and congratulations. :)


http://farm1.static.flickr.com/158/360197307_8639ee4a46_m.jpg[/img=left]
[i]~Nitram~
57 Transtar
Lancaster, PA

BobGlasscock
05-10-2008, 08:17 AM
I LOVE these posts!! Let's me live vicariously through ya'll. Now that my Champion is a decent driver, it is my dream to find my dream car and do a full restoration. May not ever happen, but posts like this give me hope.

'50 Champion, 1 family owner

53k
05-10-2008, 08:57 AM
Great find and great story!
I think the Canadian-built cars were less rust prone than the SB counterparts (white steering wheel is unique to Hamilton cars). When I picked up my '64 Daytona at Hamilton the man giving me a plant tour took great pride in showing me how they dipped the bodies in an aluminizing solution before painting (not done in SB).
Re the black paint in the engine compartment- it probably had the same crummy paint job in the engine compartment that mine did:(. I certainly wouldn't do it now, but I sprayed mine with black undercoating to cover the unpainted areas (at least the SB cars were completely painted in the engine compartment:D).

[img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/R-4.JPG[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/64L.JPG[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/64P.jpg[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/53K.jpg[/img=right]Paul Johnson, Wild and Wonderful West Virginia
'53 Commander Starliner (since 1966)
'64 Daytona Wagonaire (original owner)
'64 Daytona Convertible (2006)
Museum R-4 engine
1962 Gravely Model L (Studebaker-Packard serial plate)
1972 Gravely Model 430 (Studebaker name plate, Studebaker Onan engine)

52-fan
05-10-2008, 08:59 AM
This kind of post inspires me to get outside and work on the Daytona. Finally got my new parking brake cable hooked up to the new rear brakes and managed to drive and stop a little for the first time. Big step!

1952 Champion Starlight, 1962 Daytona. Searcy,Arkansas

Roscomacaw
05-10-2008, 09:52 AM
Good find, Gord! Looks like one to save, for sure.;) I've been thinking about seeing if that Wagonaire I just got will run. The only history I know about it is that it's been in this valley since new. That and that it was retired from the road in the mid-70s.
I only checked just yesterday, but the thing sports a 289 as well as the afroementioned 4-speed. And while it's stuck, I may be able to break it loose with some soaking and elbow grease. I'll pull the plugs and pour in some penetrant today. You've inspired me a bit to see what I can do!:D

Miscreant Studebaker nut in California's central valley.

1957 Transtar 1/2ton
1960 Larkvertible V8
1958 Provincial wagon
1953 Commander coupe
1957 President two door

bams50
05-10-2008, 10:00 AM
Good luck on that, Biggs- you know I'm rootin' for the old wagon[:X]

Is that a factory 4-speed, or did someone convert it?



Robert (Bob) Andrews Owner- Studebakeracres- on the IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
Parish, central NY 13131

"Some people live for the rules, I live for exceptions"- 311

"With your Lark you're on your own, free as a bird, alive as a Lark. You've suddenly discovered that happiness is a thing called Larking!"

Dick Steinkamp
05-10-2008, 10:21 AM
Nice, Gord! [^] Congratulations!!

Great story (as usual).

Well done!

http://i149.photobucket.com/albums/s66/ddstnkmp/54%20starlight/HiResS2Dsig2.jpg

Dick Steinkamp
05-10-2008, 10:30 AM
quote:Originally posted by bams50


Is that a factory 4-speed, or did someone convert it?




I visited Bob on Wednesday and checked out the wagon. Very nicely equipped FACTORY 4 speed car. I can't imagine many 4 speed Daytona wagons were produced in '63. A rare car for sure.

Also, the pictures Bob posted don't do this car justice. Quite straight and with essentially no rust. It SHOULD be brought back.

Bob told me the story about the '63 Daytona Hardtop I bought from him. Essentially a crunched hulk with all the trim and other valuable parts lost in a fire after the car was disassembled for restoration. Certainly a candidate for the crusher. Bob bought the car, had BEAUTIFUL body and paint work done to it, and gathered all the missing parts (many NOS). I'll finish putting it together after he did all the hard work. If this Daytona Hardtop could be saved, the much rarer wagon can be too...and MUCH easier.

Here's a reminder picture of the current condition of the hardtop...

http://i149.photobucket.com/albums/s66/ddstnkmp/63%20Daytona/pics056.jpg

http://i149.photobucket.com/albums/s66/ddstnkmp/54%20starlight/HiResS2Dsig2.jpg

laughinlark
05-10-2008, 10:57 AM
Nice ride Gordr. I also like these kinds of posts. I think getting a new Stude that has sat for many years are the funnest. What always gets me going is finding out why it was parked in the first place. Some of my parts cars I've bought through the years turned into great daily drivers.[:p]

Gordon

http://i157.photobucket.com/albums/t60/laughinlark/gordsjsmk-1.jpghttp://i157.photobucket.com/albums/t60/laughinlark/11-28-07130-1.jpghttp://i157.photobucket.com/albums/t60/laughinlark/all283.jpg

JBOYLE
05-10-2008, 12:10 PM
Great story...thanks for sharing and most of all, thanks for saving the car.

If we don't do it now, who will?
Or else in 50 years everyone will think the only Studes ever made were various R2s, Hawks, C/Ks, bulletnoses, Avantis...

63 Avanti R1 2788
1914 Stutz Bearcat
(George Barris replica)

Washington State

bams50
05-10-2008, 12:14 PM
Dick, you got any pics of that wagon??



Robert (Bob) Andrews Owner- Studebakeracres- on the IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
Parish, central NY 13131

"Some people live for the rules, I live for exceptions"- 311

"With your Lark you're on your own, free as a bird, alive as a Lark. You've suddenly discovered that happiness is a thing called Larking!"

Mark57
05-10-2008, 12:27 PM
quote:Originally posted by Dick Steinkamp
Here's a reminder picture of the current condition of the hardtop...
http://i149.photobucket.com/albums/s66/ddstnkmp/63%20Daytona/pics056.jpg


Great story Gord... looks like that machine will keep you out of trouble for a little while. :D

Nice pic Dick - I really like to look of the hubcaps on Larks and Champs way better than the full wheel covers.[^] Creates a very "clean" look. [8D]

<h5>Mark
'57 Transtar Deluxe
Vancouver Island </h5>
http://i186.photobucket.com/albums/x153/MarkH57/IMG_0099A.jpg

Dick Steinkamp
05-10-2008, 12:37 PM
quote:Originally posted by Mark57
Great story Gord... looks like that machine will keep you out of trouble for a little while.


I think it's illegal to use "Gord" and "out of trouble" in the same sentence :D.



I didn't take any pics of Mr. Bigg's wagon, Bob. Biggs and I were too busy STS [^] [8D].

http://i149.photobucket.com/albums/s66/ddstnkmp/54%20starlight/HiResS2Dsig2.jpg

bams50
05-10-2008, 12:43 PM
Back to Gord's car...

I get a kick out of the wheels being white, except for the very center. Reminds me of when I was a kid, when wheel color was preferred matched to the body, especially if it was a bright color. Many times we'd pull a full wheel cover off and find that only the outer inch of the wheel had been brush painted body color- just the part that showed with the cap on[:o)]



Robert (Bob) Andrews Owner- Studebakeracres- on the IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
Parish, central NY 13131

"Some people live for the rules, I live for exceptions"- 311

"With your Lark you're on your own, free as a bird, alive as a Lark. You've suddenly discovered that happiness is a thing called Larking!"

gordr
05-11-2008, 01:29 AM
...Speaking of wheels, here's a picture that I hope is worth a thousand words. Remember the discussions we had about the hazards of mounting 205/75R15 (or bigger) tires on 4 1/2" Lark rims? Here's an example of the kind of cracking I reported about; it's just getting started, but I can snag it with my fingernail: http://i210.photobucket.com/albums/bb222/gordintrochu/64Daytona/CrackedRim.jpg

This the left rear wheel on this car.

I got in a productive day today: demounted the left front tire, which would lose air overnight, and cleaned the sealing surfaces of the rim and re-mounted the tire. I think I fixed it. Morning should tell the tale. While I had the tire off, I pulled the brake drum, since that wheel locked up on me when I hit the brakes. Shoes have lots of lining, drum is in good shape, but the wheel cylinder was stuck. Ran the hone through it, and reassembled it. I found the anchor pin for the return spring was bent, so I tried to straighten it. It snapped right off. Oh well, got another backing plate from the barn and swapped it in. Changed the outer wheel bearing for good measure, and packed the bearings. Greased the king pin and trunnions, too. Put the left wheel back on, and attacked the right front. Something was very wrong here, because the spindle nut was only on about 4 turns. Pulled the drum, and woo-hoo, what a mess. The area of the hub where the race for the inner bearing sits was all hammered in on one side, so a seal could not be installed. Someone had stacked a SECOND outer race (cup) and cone in there, smaller ones than the normal ones are. And wedged the drum back on. So the drum sat about 1/2" out from its normal position. The drum can be saved, but the hub is effectively toast. I went back to the barn and found a good hub/drum combination, and installed that, after honing the wheel cylinder which also was stuck. Of course, I greased the front suspension on that side, too. Now the car has a high firm brake pedal, and it stops straight, and quickly.

I decided to tackle the clogged muffler, and began undoing the muffler clamps. Encouraged by the attention, the muffler fell out on the ground, both inlet and outlet being rusted off. Problem solved? A spin around the yard revealed the hiss was gone, not that you could hear it over the bark of a straight pipe, anyway, but the car definitely has a lot more pep. Still, it runs out of fuel and quits after a few seconds at 1/2 throttle or better. I think I may have problems with the fuel pump, or possibly with the outlet of the garden tractor tank I'm using as a temporary fuel supply.

Finished the day by re-installing a bunch of the parts the P.O. had removed, including the front anti-sway bar, the chin spoiler, hood latch support panel, and grille. It's clear the car was in a front-end collision, as those 3 body parts have all been tweaked and incompletely repaired. I'm going to order new front fenders and lower air panel (chin spoiler), and see if I can get a good straight hood latch panel. The car is worth it. The hood now latches and unlatches nicely, anyhow.

Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

alanmende
05-11-2008, 07:18 AM
Great stories, Gord. Keep them coming. They've got me itching to get back to work on our '54 Commander Starliner, Grace, as soon as the surgeon who did my carpal tunnel surgery says I can resume my activities. (That "got me itching" is a literal statement. The healing incision in my hand is driving me crazy!)

Kindest regards,

Alan Mende
Hummelstown, PA

sals54
05-11-2008, 03:24 PM
C'mon Gord, is that really a crack? I can't even see through it yet.!?!?!?! Good point, really.

sals54
http://i296.photobucket.com/albums/mm197/sals54/NewSignature.jpg

gordr
05-11-2008, 09:51 PM
quote:Originally posted by sals54

C'mon Gord, is that really a crack? I can't even see through it yet.!?!?!?! Good point, really.

sals54
http://i296.photobucket.com/albums/mm197/sals54/NewSignature.jpg


Well, I can snag it with my fingernail. Now it might be just a scratch, but when those wheels do crack, that's exactly where it happens. If this car becomes a driver, the rims and tires are going to be relegated to holding up a parts car.

Got a bit more good work done today. Front bumper is back on, it's a little crooked, but it's there. I'm not trying to "restore" this car, just putting all the loose parts back on to keep it as intact as possible. I even used a rattle can to spray white paint on a big rusty patch on the chin spoiler and the cowl vent grille, too. Just makes it look more like a car, and less like a wreck, I guess. I doctored up the sockets in the front park/turn lamp housings, and made new harnesses for them, and got them installed in the chin spoiler. Found a (mismatched) pair of lenses in my junk box, and put them on. It now has working park lamps and turn signals. I welded the cap portion of the tranny dipstick to the proper place on the stick, as it was loose, and discovered that the tranny was about 2 quarts low. Added some fluid, and it now shifts just fine.

Checked the timing and dwell, and they were away off, so I pulled out the Prestolite distributor and serviced it. Believe it or not, the advance weights are in good shape. One spring was damaged, so I found a good one in the spares box and installed that. The engine runs better, now, but it really, really needs a new carb. I know one I can rob off another car here. It's getting fuel to the carb OK, but it just won't run properly. Carb gaskets are dried out, which is most likely the root of the trouble.

Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

sals54
05-11-2008, 11:54 PM
Hey, Gord, I was just joshin ya. Its a good point about the wheel cracks. I use later model wheels on my drivers, so I don't really even think about it.

sals54
http://i296.photobucket.com/albums/mm197/sals54/NewSignature.jpg

showbizkid
05-12-2008, 02:13 AM
This is a really great thread, Gord. Thanks for taking the time to post it. Love hearing stories like this!


[img=left]http://members.cox.net/clarknovak/lark.gif[/img=left]

Clark in San Diego
'63 F2/Lark Standard
http://studeblogger.blogspot.com
www.studebakersandiego.com

gordr
05-12-2008, 08:17 PM
This will probably be my last post to this thread for a while. I've about run out of things to do. I robbed the carb off a '64 Cruiser, which won't miss it because the engine is seized. Cleaned it inside and out, and mounted on the Daytona. Runs MUCH better, except for a flat spot just off idle, which is probably the accelerator pump. Maybe the leather plunger will soften up with a bit of use.

I have an old Chevy truck on the place, and I robbed the muffler out of it. Same layout as the Stude muffler, just a little shorter. I was able to clamp it up to the front exhaust pipe OK, and I welded it to the tailpipe, which was broken off a bit short. Works fine, nice and quiet, and doesn't bang the undercarriage.

Then I robbed the fuel tank off a very rusty '63 Lark VI. Still had 3 gallons of gas in it, too. Emptied the gas out to make it easier to handle, and bolted it into the Daytona. Fits perfectly, and the inlet hose is not all perished. Poured the 3 gallons of gas back in, and started the car. The fuel gage came up off the peg, just barely, so I'm inclined to think it will work OK.

The only thing remaining to be done (at least to make it semi-roadworthy) is the windshield wipers. Motor and/or linkage appear to be jammed. I think I can rob the whole works off the car that gave up its gas tank, since it is fated to be a parts car, anyway. It also has 4 Ford rims on it, and I will use them for the Daytona, should I decide to drive it.

Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

Mark57
05-12-2008, 09:00 PM
Hmmm reading Gord's posts here I can see the makings for a "new" reality show! ;)[}:)]

<h5>Mark
'57 Transtar Deluxe
Vancouver Island </h5>
http://i186.photobucket.com/albums/x153/MarkH57/IMG_0099A.jpg

gordr
05-14-2008, 11:47 PM
Uh-oh! I did find more to do. I actually insured and licensed the poor old thing, and took it on a 20 mile round trip to Three Hills. Didn't have to walk back, either. Once it's warmed up, the flat spot in the carb goes away. It rides and steers pretty well, but the steering wheel needs to be centered. No sign at all of blue smoke from the tailpipe, and it pulls pretty strong. Transmission shifts way too late, which is probably a sign of perished transmission mounts.

Biggest problem was the brakes. A firm, high pedal is not much use if the left front wheel grabs badly. Looks like the linings, which were quite new, got soaked in brake fluid from the leaky cylinder. Surprisingly, the cylinder, which I had honed out, was not leaking when I opened up the wheel tonight. Must be old fluid contaminating the linings. Anyway, I had a set of '55 front brakes, freshly rebuilt, so I swapped the linings and wheel cylinders, and drums over. Now it stops straight and true.

Earlier today, I swapped in a wiper motor and some linkage from a parts car, and the wiper switch as well. Wipers now work fine on both speeds, and park as they should.

The turn signals, which WERE working, quit on my road test, and I figured maybe I'd disturbed the wiring while struggling with the wiper switch, which is a PITA to change. Nope, just the old flasher gave up the ghost. I installed an "electronic" flasher from my junk box, and the signals now work fine, with a more audible click, too.

One other snag I noticed: the engine has a bad oil leak from the front. It looks like a case of stripped threads in the filler block between the oil pan and the timing cover, which is a well-known malady. And the engine runs a little warm, if the temperature gage is to be believed. Might be a sludged-up water jacket.

But it's a driver, now! I even took a rattle can of white paint and covered all the ugly rust and yellow paint on the hood where someone had commenced to strip it.

And I put a set of dog-dish hub caps on it. I'm stylin', now.

Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

bams50
05-15-2008, 05:10 AM
Great to hear, Gord, and love following your progress. If your area is anything like mine folks either love the car, or make a funny face when they see it, or a combination of both.

Hope she gives you good service[^]



Robert (Bob) Andrews Owner- Studebakeracres- on the IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
Parish, central NY 13131

"Some people live for the rules, I live for exceptions"- 311

"With your Lark you're on your own, free as a bird, alive as a Lark. You've suddenly discovered that happiness is a thing called Larking!"

BobPalma
05-15-2008, 07:12 AM
:) Interesting thread, Gord. Thanks.

Your transmission dipstick experience is similar to that of the engine oil dipstick on my '64 Daytona sedan. When I got the car, I monitored the oil level (and loss, as it uses some oil) on the dipstick for a year or so. Then it dawned on me one day, "Hey, this isn't a Studebaker dipstick; it's a little too short, and the markings are at the very bottom!"

Sure enough, someone had installed a Chevy dipsick at some point. When I compared the lengths and lettering, I discovered that "Full" on the Chevy dipstick was barely 4 quarts of oil in the crankcase! Installing a Studebaker V-8 dipstick then enabled the engine to again operate on a full five quarts of oil.
No wonder it "uses some oil;" who knows how many years it's been running around on less than 4 quarts of oil when the previous owners thought it was Full! [:0] But it is tight and quiet, like all good Studebaker V-8s...(hmmm, I guess good and Studebaker V-8 is redundant...) :DBP

gordr
05-15-2008, 10:42 AM
Yep, those little caps on the dipsticks are really prone to working loose. I usually weld them in place as a matter of course.

By the way, you'll be pleased to learn I also installed the battery hold-down!

Very good to see you on the mend from your surgery, Bob!

Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

rbruner
05-15-2008, 01:06 PM
Good luck, Gord. What a great project! Your advice on the Champ clutch was invaluable. What a pleasure to drive now. Whadda I owe you? :D

http://i259.photobucket.com/albums/hh295/sbruner_2008/641Champ.jpg

StudeRich
05-15-2008, 01:19 PM
Gord, that is a nice second series '64 Daytona Hardtop! [^]

Does it have a "custom" Vinyl covered roof, or is that black paint someone added?

StudeRich
Studebakers Northwest
Ferndale, WA

gordr
05-15-2008, 07:41 PM
Rich, it has a "custom" fake vinyl roof, 2 strips of convex-section tape, and a mess of textured paint that resembles undercoating, but is harder to take off. Lacquer thinner made the color run, but did not soften it enough to permit it to be scraped off. Thinners DID work wonders on the rattle-can black paint under the hood, though.

What makes it a second-series?

Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

StudeRich
05-15-2008, 10:34 PM
Well it may not be a big deal to you Canucks, but here it is! The late '64 Canadian "Imports" all have those White (Ivory) Steering Wheels and Crossed Flags with no V-8 emblem, quite noticeable to us! [:0]

I think it may have been Bob Palma (alias:'64 Daytona Bob) who coined that term "Second Series", (or maybe Fred Fox) and I always use it to describe a late '64.


quote:Originally posted by gordr

What makes it a second-series?

StudeRich
Studebakers Northwest
Ferndale, WA

gordr
05-15-2008, 11:10 PM
I getcha. Sometimes little things like that escape my notice.

Put this one down to: "best-laid plans, etc."

I took off this afternoon in the Daytona with the plan to drive in to Calgary to do some shopping. Got about 20 miles from home, and heard a funny sound after I hit a bump at speed passing a slower vehicle on the highway. I was doing about 65 mph.

Shortly after, the temp gage began to climb, and I saw droplets of coolant on the windshield. I turned onto a secondary road and slowed right down, which allowed the engine to cool down a bit, and then I began to head homeward on the grid roads. Made it about 6 miles back, and hit the next paved road, when the temp gage again started rising fast. I turned onto the pavement, and shut off the engine and coasted about a half-mile downhill to a turnout. Had a look under the hood. The radiator had come back and kissed the fan, and was squirting fine jets of coolant out about 6 tiny holes.

I picked up my cellphone, and called my neighbor, who came down and fetched me home. I hitched up the car trailer to the Suburban, and went right back and loaded the car, which I was able to drive onto the trailer OK, except for one problem. The muffler snagged on the back edge of the trailer deck, and slipped right off the front pipe, doubling up and breaking the tailpipe in the process. The tailpipe WAS old and thin, so there is no great loss there. I may have an NOS tailpipe on hand, too.

Got it home without further incident, and went to work helping the neighbor hook up the lights and brakes on his travel trailer, so they could take it to the campground on the river for the long weekend.

After making myself some hot dogs for supper, I pulled the rad out, and found that the right side mounting bracket had come completely free of the top and bottom tanks, allowing the radiator to swing like a gate into the fan. Motor mounts, at least at the front, are OK. The engine had stayed put. So I soldered up the holes in about 5 radiator tubes, and cleaned rad tanks and bracket, and soldered that back on, too. Reinstalled it in the car, and it appears to hold water; at least I could see no streams of water in the dusk.

I had thought about taking this car to the Northwest Overdrive, but I guess it's not quite ready for prime time. I think this is a case where some "might as wells" could be piled together into a project: take the front fenders, grille, and radiator saddle out; knock out the frost plugs, and pressure-wash the crud out of the water jackets; drop the oil pan and replace the filler block at the front (remove timing cover if need be); detail the engine a bit and clean/paint the front end, changing the A-arm bushings if required; shoot a coat of white paint on the firewall and on the aprons of the set of patched-up front fenders I have sitting in the back of my old Wagonaire; hang the new fenders back on the car. No question, but what the mechanical work is easier with the fenders and aprons set aside, and the front fenders are by far the rustiest part of the outer body shell.

By the way, that engine never blew any blue smoke on its road trip, and held 60 psi oil pressure at cruise. I'd say it's a pretty tight engine, yet.

Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands