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dougmays
05-06-2008, 11:17 AM
Hello,
i've been going around in circles here and i'm looking for some towing advice. I'm trying to tow my 1962 Champ truck with my 2007 toyota tacoma (tow package and 4WD). I've done the math and it looks like my truck should be more the well equipped to tow the truck, but Uhaul doesn't have the towing package listed in there computers so they wont let me tow it, unless i Lie about the car i'm pulling. But i was wondering if i could use a tow dolly. I've been told that you really dont want to tow older vehicles with dollys....is this the case with a 62? or would i be ok towing it with the dolly. If i cant, and have to use a flatbed trailer, will the truck be narrow enough to fit on one of those trailers? Anyone with any advice or experience in this please write back.

i appreciate it

doug

tutone63
05-06-2008, 11:24 AM
I am not much of an expert, but I have towed older vehicles with a tow bar (all 4 wheels on the ground), and what I have done is disconnect the driveshaft to prevent any damage to the drivetrain. If that is what you are concerned about.

http://i253.photobucket.com/albums/hh54/tutone63/63larkside-1.jpg
1963 Lark Custom, 259 V8, TT, 4 doors, 2 tone paint. Driven often, always noticed. Man I love this car!!

dougmays
05-06-2008, 11:37 AM
hmmm...how hard is it to disconnect the drive shaft? i'm not much of a mechanic

mapman
05-06-2008, 11:57 AM
FWIW I towed my 64 on a dolly with a 3/4 ton dodge van with no problem. Mine has a manual trans and I didn't disconnect the drive line. I did check often to make sure no problems developed. It was about 100 miles in the hills of N. Idaho. 60 MPH but no freeway.
Rob

Dick Steinkamp
05-06-2008, 12:02 PM
The downside of towing with a dolly or flat towing (IMHO) is stopping, not going. The total package will weigh more than TWICE the weight of the tow vehicle. In a situation where you need to stop as quickly as you normally would with just the tow vehicle, you'll be toast.

I would guess the tow package on a Tacoma is the hitch and a wiring harness. It wouldn't add to the tow CAPACITY of the truck. U Haul errs on the safe side. I think I'd borrow or rent a bigger truck.

http://i149.photobucket.com/albums/s66/ddstnkmp/54%20starlight/HiResS2Dsig2.jpg

Flashback
05-06-2008, 12:16 PM
How far are you towing?

Tex E. Grier

shewolf
05-06-2008, 12:18 PM
U-haul has gotten bad about not renting auto transport trailers(at least here) to be pulled with anything less than their truck.I agree with Dick though that I would want a heavier truck than the tacoma to haul the champ.It would probably do it but would be a bit squirelly especially when a tractor-trailer passes.Steve

Can't wait to drive my V-8!
'63 Lark

JRoberts
05-06-2008, 12:19 PM
quote:Originally posted by dougmays

Hello,
i've been going around in circles here and i'm looking for some towing advice. I'm trying to tow my 1962 Champ truck with my 2007 toyota tacoma (tow package and 4WD). I've done the math and it looks like my truck should be more the well equipped to tow the truck, but Uhaul doesn't have the towing package listed in there computers so they wont let me tow it, unless i Lie about the car i'm pulling. But i was wondering if i could use a tow dolly. I've been told that you really dont want to tow older vehicles with dollys....is this the case with a 62? or would i be ok towing it with the dolly. If i cant, and have to use a flatbed trailer, will the truck be narrow enough to fit on one of those trailers? Anyone with any advice or experience in this please write back.

i appreciate it

doug


See what the least expensive truck U-haul has that they would approve to pull the trailer with the Champ. That maybe the easiest thing to do if you cannot borrow a bigger truck.
When I wanted to tow a 2R6 pickup with a friend's 4x4 f150 several years ago I found that some U-Haul dealers would not rent me the trailer and some would. Check around.

Joe Roberts
'61 R1 Champ
'65 Cruiser
Editor of "The Down Easterner"
Eastern North Carolina Chapter

Guido
05-06-2008, 12:27 PM
Dick is on target. Going is not the issue, but stopping is. A trailer or a good tow dolly will have brakes that will assist with stopping. I would not recommend flat towing as there can be issues with the towed vehicle cornering. If you do flat tow be sure to pull the driveshaft (and make sure you do not lose oil/fluid from the transmission).

You could always load the Champ INSIDE one of the U-Haul trucks. [:0]

http://thumb14.webshots.net/t/63/663/9/36/86/2567936860097493054TXiheL_th.jpgGuido Salvage - "Where rust is beautiful" and real Studebaker horsepower lives

See pictures here: http://community.webshots.com/user/GuidoSalvage

Hiding and preserving Studebakers in Richmond, Goochland & Louisa, Va.

studeclunker
05-06-2008, 12:42 PM
As a friend of mine has a Tacoma (probably similar to yours) I can say that for a short distance, it would be okay. Just keep your speed down. You'll have to borrow a truck to pick up the dolly though. By the by, they probably wouldn't rent the dolly to you if you were using the Champ to tow the Tacoma either. U-haul can be really silly about them. Probably past experiance on the stupidity of the population (present company excepted).

If you do use the Tacoma to tow the Champ, keep in mind what Dick said. Drive slower than you normally would, give yourself TWICE the normal stopping distance (minimum), and keep your speed down. There's no shame in driving slow and letting people pass you.

On the other hand, it's not a problem renting a U-haul truck. If you attempted to trailer the Champ with your Tacoma it would ruin the Toyota. That's way too much weight for it. Sure, it would probably do it... Then later you would be dealing with a bad transmission and possible engine problems.

As to the Champ fitting on a U-haul trailer? Yes it will. Studebaker pickups are narrow enough to fit. In fact, I was able to get a 71 Cadillac on a U-haul trailer, so a Champ will fit. Just make sure you face it forward.

For a short distance (across town) I'd say, 'go for it'. Any more than twenty miles... Rent the U-haul truck.;)

http://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b18/Studeclunker/december%2006/HPIM0234.jpg http://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b18/Studeclunker/56%20Parkview%20Wagon/56wagonleftfrontclipped-1.jpg
Home of the famous Mr. Ed!
Lotsa Larks!
K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
Ron Smith
Where the heck is Lewiston, CA?

61hawk
05-06-2008, 01:26 PM
quote:Originally posted by dougmays

Hello,
i've been going around in circles here and i'm looking for some towing advice. I'm trying to tow my 1962 Champ truck with my 2007 toyota tacoma (tow package and 4WD). I've done the math and it looks like my truck should be more the well equipped to tow the truck, but Uhaul doesn't have the towing package listed in there computers so they wont let me tow it, unless i Lie about the car i'm pulling. But i was wondering if i could use a tow dolly. I've been told that you really dont want to tow older vehicles with dollys....is this the case with a 62? or would i be ok towing it with the dolly. If i cant, and have to use a flatbed trailer, will the truck be narrow enough to fit on one of those trailers? Anyone with any advice or experience in this please write back.

i appreciate it

doug


As long as you have a trailer brake setup on the trailer you'll be fine. I've towed Studebakers plenty of times with my 2000 Tacoma (smaller than the '07) and it didn't have a problem. I've towed across NC; from NY to NC; from PA to NC as long as you keep it out of OD up hills.

Pictures here:
http://www.studebakerdriversclub.com/sdc_forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=18449&whichpage=2

Lee

BobGlasscock
05-06-2008, 01:38 PM
When I was shopping for a way to move my '50 Champion, I found Penske to have the best deal. They had a bobtail box truck with a auto trailer and the rate for both of them for 1 day, 250 mile roundtrip was $85. Beat the you know what out of ALL of the other rentals.

'50 Champion, 1 family owner

dougmays
05-06-2008, 01:42 PM
i'm going 150 miles or less, i'm not really concerned about my truck pulling the champ...i'm on a tacoma forum as well and there is a guy who tows a huge trailer with a backhoe on it. I currently tow my boat which is about 5000 lbs just fine with my truck. I was mainly concerned with the champ and the trailer. But i'm glad to know it'll be narrow enough. Another thing i'm up against is that the truck is inoperable now....so i was also looking for a trailer with a winch or a come-along....but come along's only have 6 feet of cable so i'm going to need to attach that to a chain or something. How do i disconnect the drive shaft? also what do you guys think about a tow bar instead of a trailer/dolly? Also someone mentioned checking the transmission fluid while towing if not on a trailer....is this a common problem?

BobGlasscock
05-06-2008, 01:54 PM
I have towed payloads around 5000 lbs with my 84 Toyota (no model name, it was before they started the model names) with no problems. Flatbeds with loads, UHaul box trailers loaded, whatever. I have also towed my '50 Champion over 600 miles, all four on the road, just making sure it stayed in neutral. I don't think you have mentioned if your p/u is standard or automatic, makes a difference. A come-along is no sweat with a chain and multiple pulling stages, or a block-and-tackle with a long stretch, or two big guys. Auto trailers may be heavier than a simple flatbed if that is an issue. I've used both and the flatbeds with low sides have worked with car doors.
As a proud Toyota owner, GO FOR IT! :)

'50 Champion, 1 family owner

dougmays
05-06-2008, 02:04 PM
haha thanks for the words of encouragement! its a manual....so would putting it in N work or do i need to disconnect the drive shaft? i'm thinking about just telling uhaul i'm towing a dodge neon so they'll give me the trailer and come along-ing it on the the trailer. even with 2 big guys i'm not sure that truck would be easy to get on the trailer :) i just want to make sure also that the champ one damage or push the trailer to its limits because if its size. Also this is a Champ Truck not a champion...if that makes any difference

Did you use a tow bar on the 60?

Dick Steinkamp
05-06-2008, 02:18 PM
quote:Originally posted by dougmays
I'm thinking about just telling uhaul i'm towing a dodge neon


Never a good idea to lie. It would most likely cause you BIG trouble (and money) if they found out and/or if you had an accident or other problem. If you are going to rent from them, play by their rules. It may cost a few extra bucks up front, but it may be the cheapest in the long run...plus you and your load have a much better chance of actually making it to the destination.

If you do end up with a non U-Haul approved set up, please let me know where and when you will be towing...I wouldn't want friends and family to get in your way [^]

http://i149.photobucket.com/albums/s66/ddstnkmp/54%20starlight/HiResS2Dsig2.jpg

bams50
05-06-2008, 03:18 PM
As someone with much experience, I highly recommend a dolly over a trailer; and never recommend a tow bar to the inexperienced.

Your Tacoma will be working pretty hard in any case; but it's much more with a trailer. Not only do you have the heavy trailer (that you'll really feel even empty) but you have the added stress of tongue weight; that is, the downward force that the trailer puts on the back of your truck. You'd have to have the Champ situated just perfectly on the trailer- too far forward, and you'll have the rear of your Tacoma forced dangerously low... too far back, and the trailer will whip around and create an extremely dangerous situation, even at low speeds. The load only has to be a foot or less one way or the other to have a big effect. Then there's the whole issue of tieing the load down properly, critical and tricky for the inexperienced.

With a dolly you eliminate the problem of tongue weight; it doesn't apply. Loading and tiedown is greatly simplified as well; you get the front wheels on the dolly, put the straps up over the tires, tighten, and you're done. I also add a safety chain from the load to the dolly just as a fail-safe if the dolly doesn't have one. You also don't have the balance or sway issues; the load is lower, and so much more stable, especially in winds.

Being a manual trans., you need do nothing but put in neutral. I've towed literally hundreds of miles that way with not one problem. Just be sure your rear tires on the Champ are good shape, and re-check the tightness of the straps after a couple turns.

It's true most dollies don't have brakes. I've never owned or used one with brakes in over 10,000 miles of towing. But I always made sure my tow vehicle has well-maintained brakes and excellent tires. Being a 2007, we know yours has that. But I'm concerned about the weight of your truck. I tow with a 3/4 ton full-size conversion van; so my tow vehicle is heavier than the total load by a fair amount. If you go slowly and carefully you should be OK, but I'd recommend a heavier tow vehicle if you can. In any case, leave plenty of braking distance- err on the side of caution. If you do, everything should be alright. With that truck you won't have the power to go very fast anyway, except downhill.

I have been towing with dollies for years. I have a nice trailer that I keep around just in case, but haven't even hooked up to it in going on 5 years. The dolly is easier to tow, easier to use, and much safer- especially for beginners. I used to rent from U-Haul but they got sillier and sillier on their requirements, and I hate to lie, even though the counterman at U-Haul TOLD me to; so I bought one. There will be those who disagree, and have something against dollies; but based upon my extensive experience, for the above reasons I highly recommend a tow dolly; and in your case possibly a heavier truck if you can get one.



Robert (Bob) Andrews Owner- Studebakeracres- on the IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
Parish, central NY 13131

"Some people live for the rules, I live for exceptions"- 311

"With your Lark you're on your own, free as a bird, alive as a Lark. You've suddenly discovered that happiness is a thing called Larking!"

wcarroll@outrageous.net
05-06-2008, 03:28 PM
Uhaul is pretty much a joke these days. If a particular car or truck maker and or model is not listed in their computer, they basically tell you to take hike. If you are concerned about the weight factor and do not have much experience towing heavy loads, pick a truck model similar in size and weight to the Studebaker Champ and run that combo by them with your Toyota.
Surge brakes are always a plus and I have seem some tow dollys equipped with them, but I've always prefered the handling of a car transport trailer over a dolly. They usually only cost a fraction more to rent from Uhaul and are almost always equipped with surge brake systems.

http://community.webshots.com/user/s2dbaker?vhost=community

dougmays
05-06-2008, 03:52 PM
Thanks for the info very helpful! I've towed with a flat bed before but never a dolly....since just the front 2 wheels are on the dolly....doesn't that add alot of "pull" from the trailer hitch from the ball. Does that make sense? regardless of my towing vehicle....does that create a "odd" position on the hitch? or does the dolly put enough downward weight on the tongue?

jackb
05-06-2008, 04:09 PM
......don't try to tow that truck with your Toyota !!!!! Read betweeen the lines here. You don't have enough truck!!! Bag the Toyota forum bragging about how they can tow the Brooklyn Bridge with that little truck. Same as Stude-o-philes who want to believe the trucks were superior to today's units......I had a 62' Champ truck. Put over 100K miles on it and hauled more cord of wood and towed more things than I can remember....Fact is, by today's standards, it was fair at best with any kind of a load behind it. Make things easier on yourself and rent a 3/4 ton truck (or bigger), drive with some comfort and insurance, and come back and tell us about how smooth it was and that your hell-bent to tear into your new friend and get it on the road........Please don't come back here telling us about the adventure you had, but wished you hadn't.....

bams50
05-06-2008, 04:16 PM
The dolly puts NO downward weight on the tongue, or the truck. That's what makes it safer and more stable! You don't have any carrying capacity to deal with, only pulling force- and that's always easier to handle. Don't know what you mean by "odd position"...but a dolly is a better position any day than a trailer.





Robert (Bob) Andrews Owner- Studebakeracres- on the IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
Parish, central NY 13131

"Some people live for the rules, I live for exceptions"- 311

"With your Lark you're on your own, free as a bird, alive as a Lark. You've suddenly discovered that happiness is a thing called Larking!"

dougmays
05-06-2008, 04:19 PM
ok thanks....last question..i think.....would i be able to hook a come along up to the dolly to get the truck onto it? the truck currently isn't working. or is the dolly close enough to the ground to were i might just be able to push it?

Jeff_H
05-06-2008, 04:34 PM
I used a dolly several times to tow cars with my '87 Ranger pickup. The big problem I always had is the weight of the towed vehicle wanting to fishtail the Ranger if I went too fast. 55 or 60 was the limit for that Ranger although it had the power to go faster (at least on flat ground). The other problem is braking. My Ranger was the 2wd one and not especially big brakes. For the 2001 Redwing meet I towed my partially completed '53 on a dolly with the ranger and had some "interesting" times going down a steep hill. Another time I towed a full size '65 ford galaxie. The Ranger would pull it but stopping needed to be well planned. Fortunately I was able to use some lonely backroads for the most part. The dolly doesn't put any weight on the tow vehicle hitch, but that can also be a bad thing (Re the fishtailing at speed). I used to attach a come-along to the "handle" on the dolly hitch and use that to winch dead vehicles on. The ramps up the dolly and into the tire wells are too steep to push unless you have a football team handy.

Jeff in ND
http://i156.photobucket.com/albums/t5/ee-engineer/53byalaketiny.jpg
'53 Champion Hardtop

bams50
05-06-2008, 04:38 PM
Most dollies have a tilt bed that will allow you to roll it on without too much trouble. I carry a chain and come-along to load non-runners; position the vehicle at the ramps, unroll the come-along cable all the way, connect to the truck, and then connect the chain between the come-along and the tow vehicle. Winch the load as far as the come-along will go, block, unroll the cable, shorten or eliminate the chain, finish loading.

I'm not very good at typing. If you have any more questions I will be glad to answer them on the phone if you like. E-mail me for my phone number.



Robert (Bob) Andrews Owner- Studebakeracres- on the IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
Parish, central NY 13131

"Some people live for the rules, I live for exceptions"- 311

"With your Lark you're on your own, free as a bird, alive as a Lark. You've suddenly discovered that happiness is a thing called Larking!"

bullet_nose_stude
05-06-2008, 05:28 PM
I can cite an example of how NOT to load a car on a trailer. 18 years ago, I purchased a 1954 Chrysler Station wagon near Washington, D. C. Engine & tranny gone, and steering completely disconnected. Had an 85 Chevy 1/2 ton short bed 4WD pickup with a rented car trailer from UHaul. The wagon was in a narrow garage facing outward. With 3 other guys helping, we managed to push the car while aiming the wheels and get it on the trailer. Unfortunately, we should have loaded the rear of the car on the front of the trailer. With the engine & tranny gone, the front of the car was very light, putting all of the weight on the rear of the trailer. This had the effect of trying to raise the rear of the towing vehicle on level ground or ESPECIALLY GOING DOWNHILL. If our speed exceeded 35MPH, the trailer would start trying to fishtail. Of course, going uphill, we could really speed up with no problem. But going downhill, the weight of the trailer and the wagon would start pushing the tow vehicle. It was a very long, nerve wracking trip from D. C. to Knoxville, TN. So, listen to the experiences of these posters who are giving you the straight shot.

61hawk
05-06-2008, 06:40 PM
quote:Originally posted by bams50

As someone with much experience, I highly recommend a dolly over a trailer; and never recommend a tow bar to the inexperienced.

Your Tacoma will be working pretty hard in any case; but it's much more with a trailer. Not only do you have the heavy trailer (that you'll really feel even empty) but you have the added stress of tongue weight; that is, the downward force that the trailer puts on the back of your truck. You'd have to have the Champ situated just perfectly on the trailer- too far forward, and you'll have the rear of your Tacoma forced dangerously low... too far back, and the trailer will whip around and create an extremely dangerous situation, even at low speeds. The load only has to be a foot or less one way or the other to have a big effect. Then there's the whole issue of tieing the load down properly, critical and tricky for the inexperienced.

With a dolly you eliminate the problem of tongue weight; it doesn't apply. Loading and tiedown is greatly simplified as well; you get the front wheels on the dolly, put the straps up over the tires, tighten, and you're done. I also add a safety chain from the load to the dolly just as a fail-safe if the dolly doesn't have one. You also don't have the balance or sway issues; the load is lower, and so much more stable, especially in winds.

Being a manual trans., you need do nothing but put in neutral. I've towed literally hundreds of miles that way with not one problem. Just be sure your rear tires on the Champ are good shape, and re-check the tightness of the straps after a couple turns.

It's true most dollies don't have brakes. I've never owned or used one with brakes in over 10,000 miles of towing. But I always made sure my tow vehicle has well-maintained brakes and excellent tires. Being a 2007, we know yours has that. But I'm concerned about the weight of your truck. I tow with a 3/4 ton full-size conversion van; so my tow vehicle is heavier than the total load by a fair amount. If you go slowly and carefully you should be OK, but I'd recommend a heavier tow vehicle if you can. In any case, leave plenty of braking distance- err on the side of caution. If you do, everything should be alright. With that truck you won't have the power to go very fast anyway, except downhill.

I have been towing with dollies for years. I have a nice trailer that I keep around just in case, but haven't even hooked up to it in going on 5 years. The dolly is easier to tow, easier to use, and much safer- especially for beginners. I used to rent from U-Haul but they got sillier and sillier on their requirements, and I hate to lie, even though the counterman at U-Haul TOLD me to; so I bought one. There will be those who disagree, and have something against dollies; but based upon my extensive experience, for the above reasons I highly recommend a tow dolly; and in your case possibly a heavier truck if you can get one.



Robert (Bob) Andrews Owner- Studebakeracres- on the IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
Parish, central NY 13131

"Some people live for the rules, I live for exceptions"- 311

"With your Lark you're on your own, free as a bird, alive as a Lark. You've suddenly discovered that happiness is a thing called Larking!"






I'm going to disagree. I've pulled what he is pulling and more with a smaller 2000 Tacoma. The only thing I'd make sure of is that he has a trailer brake controller in the truck and brakes on the trailer. Sure you might not break 45-50 mph on long uphill grades, but you're also not going to be stuck in 1st gear. As long as the car is loaded properly on a trailer it'll pull just fine, too much tongue weight and the front of your truck is going to feel like it's skating, too little to

BobGlasscock
05-06-2008, 06:40 PM
With the hesitations I read in your posts, I've got two suggestions.

1) Do everything exactly like Bams50 said, ;) or

2) Call PENSKE and get a matched truck and trailer. They do that. And my cost was only EIGHTY-FIVE dollars. :)

3) Ok, I lied, 3 suggestions. Don't use UHaul. [}:)]

'50 Champion, 1 family owner

61hawk
05-06-2008, 06:42 PM
quote:Originally posted by jackb

......don't try to tow that truck with your Toyota !!!!! Read betweeen the lines here. You don't have enough truck!!!


BUULLLLLSSHHHHIIIITTTTT!!!

sweetolbob
05-06-2008, 08:17 PM
When I towed my 54 hardtop back from south carolina to michigan, I began with a Reese towbar. If you want the scare of your life, try this in the mountains. Darn tough to get it to track. I rented a two wheel dolly at the first opportunity and had no problems. I would not tow a vehicle for a long distance with a tow bar. I know what some are saying, we towed our Brand X drag car years ago with no problems, as I did. However, good tracking in totally dependent on the suspension and alignment being in excellent shape. Yep, I had the steering wheel secured.

Swifster
05-06-2008, 08:32 PM
When I bought my Daytona, I had to get the car (no engine or trans) from Lake Tahoe to Detroit. The first idea was to rent a tow dolly from U-Haul. I was given the 3rd degree, but in the end they said it should be OK and they reserved a tow dolly for me to take from Tahoe to Detroit. Because it was one way, the cost was close to $400.

I priced a used U-Haul tow dolly to purchase, as they used to sell off old equipment. The cost was $647. I had to rewire the lights to use a flat four connector, but that wasn't a problem. I repacked the bearings (and they needed it) and left for Tahoe on a Thursday and arrived on Friday night (made it to Wyoming for the layover). I picked up the car on Friday night as the sun set and stayed over night in Carson City, NV.

I used the tow dolly all the way, and had no problem getting up and down thru the Rockies in Utah. It took three days to get back while doing 60-65 MPH. The bonus, is that my mileage was 18-19 MPH. The vehicle? A 2WD, 3.0L OHV V-6, automatic Ranger Club Cab with tow pkg. (hitch, wiring, cooler and 3.73's). I never had a problem, and I kept a large space between me and the cars ahead. I didn't hurt the truck (closing in on 200K now) and had no problem except for the powder blue hardtop tailgating me from CA to MI [:o)])

You will have no problem using a tow dolly. As mentioned, keep your speed down and a safe distance bewteen you and the vehicle ahead of you. I'd see if you have any friends that have a dolly that they'll let you use.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Tom - Mulberry, FL

1964 Studebaker Daytona - 289 4V, 4-Speed (Cost To Date: $2125.60)

http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i280/Swifster/rollingpi.gif http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i280/Swifster/The%20Daytona%20File/Avatar%20Size/01-01-05TheStartingPoint.jpg http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i280/Swifster/The%20Daytona%20File/Avatar%20Size/07-17-07FrontClipRemoved.jpg http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i280/Swifster/The%20Daytona%20File/Avatar%20Size/04-11-08CoolingFan.jpg

bams50
05-06-2008, 08:59 PM
quote:I'm going to disagree. I've pulled what he is pulling and more with a smaller 2000 Tacoma. The only thing I'd make sure of is that he has a trailer brake controller in the truck and brakes on the trailer.

Lee, I think you're overlooking one big factor: You have plenty of experience towing, while the OP has none. Based on that I stand by my recommendation for the doly, and against a trailer- especially with the lighter truck.



Robert (Bob) Andrews Owner- Studebakeracres- on the IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
Parish, central NY 13131

"Some people live for the rules, I live for exceptions"- 311

"With your Lark you're on your own, free as a bird, alive as a Lark. You've suddenly discovered that happiness is a thing called Larking!"

Guido
05-06-2008, 09:01 PM
Once again, TOWING is NOT the problem, safely STOPPING is. I have towed vehicles with everything from a Ford Mustang up through 3 different International Harvester trucks. I will take the IH's any day of the week over the any of the others due to their size and stopping power. As Matthew can attest to, there is nothing worse than that sinking feeling you get when you realize you have run out of room to stop.

Many things can be done, but that doesn't mean they are right or safe. Why endanger your life and the lives of those that are travelling on the same roads? Be responsible and match the equipment to the job.

Several years ago I sold a crawler loader to a fellow about 4 hours away. He showed up with a 3/4 ton Dodge truck with bald tires and a 12K gooseneck trailer. Problem was that the loader weighed 14,500 pounds. I tried to talk him out of it, but he insisted he was going home with it. I tore up the ramps on the trailer loading it and the front wheels of the truck were barely touching the ground. Never heard from him again so I do not know if he wrecked in the mountains or not.

http://thumb14.webshots.net/t/63/663/9/36/86/2567936860097493054TXiheL_th.jpgGuido Salvage - "Where rust is beautiful" and real Studebaker horsepower lives

See pictures here: http://community.webshots.com/user/GuidoSalvage

Hiding and preserving Studebakers in Richmond, Goochland & Louisa, Va.

Swifster
05-06-2008, 09:15 PM
Gary, newer trucks are rated to haul much bigger loads. It wouldn't surprise me if that Tacoma was rated for 7000#'s. My Ranger is rated at 5000#'s. The brakes will take care off that load with no problem.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Tom - Mulberry, FL

1964 Studebaker Daytona - 289 4V, 4-Speed (Cost To Date: $2125.60)

http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i280/Swifster/rollingpi.gif http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i280/Swifster/The%20Daytona%20File/Avatar%20Size/01-01-05TheStartingPoint.jpg http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i280/Swifster/The%20Daytona%20File/Avatar%20Size/07-17-07FrontClipRemoved.jpg http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i280/Swifster/The%20Daytona%20File/Avatar%20Size/04-11-08CoolingFan.jpg

bams50
05-06-2008, 09:20 PM
quote:Originally posted by Guido

Be responsible and match the equipment to the job.


I agree 100%, which is why I wrote so extensively in this thread.



Robert (Bob) Andrews Owner- Studebakeracres- on the IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
Parish, central NY 13131

"Some people live for the rules, I live for exceptions"- 311

"With your Lark you're on your own, free as a bird, alive as a Lark. You've suddenly discovered that happiness is a thing called Larking!"

dougmays
05-06-2008, 10:24 PM
oh man...i think this is the longest post i've ever started or been apart of....i thank you all for the great advice and experience. As most of you said its all about safety and common sense. I think i'm going to lean towards the dolly but i dont think i'll have a problem with the trailer if it comes down to it. IF worse some to worse my uncle is on the way to my mom's where i'll be towing from and he has a 1500 Sierra......so i think all will work out. i'll post pics after that trip. any more advice is more then welcome. Thank you all. Keep on truckin'

rockne10
05-06-2008, 10:41 PM
quote:How do i disconnect the drive shaft?
Half-inch wrench; remove nuts from saddle clamps on u-joint to rear end. Be careful to not let u-joint cups slip off and scatter needle bearings. Wrap duct tape or masking tape around u-joint to retain cups. Slip front yoke out of transmission, or wire tie the driveshaft up to the undercarriage. If you do slip the yoke out, you may loose tranny fluid and drop said fluid on our nation's highways.[:0]

bams50
05-06-2008, 11:05 PM
What Rockne said... tape the cups on and leave the driveshaft in the trans. and tie it off to the frame on one side or the other.

But again, beig a manual trans. it's NOT required.



Robert (Bob) Andrews Owner- Studebakeracres- on the IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
Parish, central NY 13131

"Some people live for the rules, I live for exceptions"- 311

"With your Lark you're on your own, free as a bird, alive as a Lark. You've suddenly discovered that happiness is a thing called Larking!"

buddymander
05-06-2008, 11:20 PM
I have towbarred cars from Cali to Chicago and back. Stopping can be a cold sweat experience. I used a U-Haul trailer to get my Studebaker truck 75 miles a few years ago and loved the trailer brakes. It added a huge amount of safety and peace of mind to the trip.

studeclunker
05-08-2008, 04:40 AM
quote:With the hesitations I read in your posts, I've got two suggestions.

1) Do everything exactly like Bams50 said, or

2) Call PENSKE and get a matched truck and trailer. They do that. And my cost was only EIGHTY-FIVE dollars.

3) Ok, I lied, 3 suggestions. Don't use UHaul.



I have to agree with this. Also, as regards your Toyota towing the heavier Champ, I still maintain it's not the greatest idea. The Toyota will probably be able to do the job. Especailly if you go slow and give yourself plenty of time and space to stop. Nevertheless, the above quoted suggestions are the best I seen here yet.;)

http://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b18/Studeclunker/december%2006/HPIM0234.jpg http://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b18/Studeclunker/56%20Parkview%20Wagon/56wagonleftfrontclipped-1.jpg
Home of the famous Mr. Ed!
Lotsa Larks!
K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
Ron Smith
Where the heck is Lewiston, CA?

bams50
05-08-2008, 05:38 AM
Another note to keep in mind: You cannot back up with a vehicle on a dolly! There's no way to do it- the table will just jackknife.

It's not a big deal; you just need to plan ahead. Stick to stations where you can pull up to the gas pumps and drive out without backing, like truck stops.

Good luck. You'll find it's not hard to do; just requires thinking ahead.



Robert (Bob) Andrews Owner- Studebakeracres- on the IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
Parish, central NY 13131

"Some people live for the rules, I live for exceptions"- 311

"With your Lark you're on your own, free as a bird, alive as a Lark. You've suddenly discovered that happiness is a thing called Larking!"

satdoc2
05-08-2008, 02:00 PM
My suggestion is count all you costs and time, plus the chance of an accident. Then call Peg Trucing, book a transport, sit back relax, go fishing,watch eBay so you can beat JHP to a good buy, Etc. I called Peg monday and the R2 hawk is now sitting in my driveway. I sold my car hauler because of the gas prices.
Allen

dougmays
05-12-2008, 10:11 AM
well guys i did it! Successful move of the studebaker with my tacoma! Here are pictures for all the advice-givers, nay-sayers, doubters, and supporters. Thanks again for all of your advice and comments.


Here are some pictures!
http://www.flickr.com/photos/26273986@N02/sets/72157605018339951/

Dick Steinkamp
05-12-2008, 10:35 AM
Your original post said...

"i've been going around in circles here and i'm looking for some towing advice. "

Seems though, that you really weren't looking for advice. Your mind was already made up and folks that gave advice that didn't agree with what you wanted to do became "nay-sayers, and doubters" in your last post.

It might be tough to give "advice" again if asked for.

Glad you made it safely [^].

BTW, I ran with scissors once and made it [:0] ;)

http://i149.photobucket.com/albums/s66/ddstnkmp/54%20starlight/HiResS2Dsig2.jpg

dougmays
05-12-2008, 10:58 AM
i dont agree with that at all...I came here for advice and i listened to what everyone said. The points that were given weighed toward me being able to tow this truck successfully, so i went for it. If you referring to my use of a trailer as opposed to the dolly, thats because the uhaul i went to didn't have any dollies, so that made the decision pretty easy. Does anyone else think that i didn't take the advice of the posters on this thread or just him? If others agree then i do apologize. Again thanks for everyone who gave there advice and comments, it was definitely used to make this decision.

satdoc2
05-12-2008, 11:58 AM
How far did you tow it? Have you totaled all your espenses? (Fuel both ways, rental fee, meals, wear to your truck. etc.) This would be helpful to others when figuring the actual cost per mile.
Allen

dougmays
05-12-2008, 12:39 PM
i haven't done any elaborate math, but the trailer and full tank of gas was a combined $160. And i actually only used 1/4 tank in my tacoma to go 130 miles. I was actually kind of impressed by that mpg. i Averaged around 60mph and kept the truck in 4th, downshifted to 3rd when going up steep hills. But in florida there aren't alot of steep inclines. It was going to cost a little over $400 to use Penske, to use there truck and trailer. I'm sure one of those transport services would have been more then that.

shifter4
05-12-2008, 04:26 PM
Well, while the topic is still hot ,I notice how much of the truck bed is beyond the trailer. I'm looking for a trailer myself , and as I have a very small backyard to store it and a tight turn in to back it into ,the shorter the trailer the better for me. It's to move a 53 coupe when I need to. Since the cars W.B. is 10', and the overall length is 17'and it looks like 3 1/2 0r 4' of rear hang over is do-able,it looks like a 13 or 14' trailer would do. What thinkest the group?

dougmays
05-12-2008, 04:39 PM
the WB on the champ was 120" and this trailer was 12ft i think. so 12-14 should be plenty enough i would think

Guido
05-12-2008, 05:18 PM
The problem with going with a short trailer is that you do not have the option of moving the vehicle forward or aft in order to balance the load on the trailer. You will find that each vehicle is different based on the front to rear weight ratio and it is important to have the proper weight distribution on the tow vehicle. In towing vehicles more is often better....

http://thumb14.webshots.net/t/63/663/9/36/86/2567936860097493054TXiheL_th.jpgGuido Salvage - "Where rust is beautiful" and real Studebaker horsepower lives

See pictures here: http://community.webshots.com/user/GuidoSalvage

Hiding and preserving Studebakers in Richmond, Goochland & Louisa, Va.

BobGlasscock
05-12-2008, 05:59 PM
Guido's post above this one segways perfectly into the only comment I wanted to make. It looks like the pickup is just a tad low in the backend compared to the front. Probably ok, but maybe 100 or 200 pounds too much tongue weight. A longer trailer would have let you back up the Champ a few inches to raise the Tacoma's rear end and give better stability on the front end. But just a tad IMHO.

'50 Champion, 1 family owner

Guido
05-12-2008, 07:23 PM
First chance I had to look at the trailer. One disadvantage to a short trailer is the fact that you are limited in how you can tie the truck off. I would be interested in seeing how you had it secured.

http://thumb14.webshots.net/t/63/663/9/36/86/2567936860097493054TXiheL_th.jpgGuido Salvage - "Where rust is beautiful" and real Studebaker horsepower lives

See pictures here: http://community.webshots.com/user/GuidoSalvage

Hiding and preserving Studebakers in Richmond, Goochland & Louisa, Va.

stephen cade
05-12-2008, 10:41 PM
The 1500 is a much better idea. Are you Roy and Dellas son? If so, I could likely help you. If so, call me at 352-213-3643. Stephen Cade

Stephen Cade

dougmays
05-13-2008, 10:42 PM
i had the 2 tire straps in front which were in there pretty darn tight. There was a security chain below the trailer toward the back when i didn't give much room for movement if the truck did get loose from the wheel tie-downs. I also had the truck in park with the hill break on. i was going to add one more tie down in the front just for extra security but my strap was all tangled and pissed me off:)

dougmays
05-15-2008, 03:55 PM
quote:Originally posted by stephen cade

The 1500 is a much better idea. Are you Roy and Dellas son? If so, I could likely help you. If so, call me at 352-213-3643. Stephen Cade

Stephen Cade


hey again stephen, i just replied to your post in my other topic. I ended up using my truck last weekend, worked out well. Only used 1/4 tank from homosassa to clearwater and it handled well.