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Skip Lackie
10-22-2006, 08:50 AM
Elsewhere on this page JDP describes his biggest bone headed move of the year. His description provokes me to suggest that others have a world-class car-related bone-headed move to report. Rather than hijack his thread, I hereby start a separate thread where we can all describe examples of our own stupidity. Here's my submission.

64 Daytona up on four jackstands in the garage. Was doing brakes, front and rear, and converting to silicone brake fluid -- which requires replacing all brake-system rubber parts and flushing all of the old fluid out of the system. Had removed the master cylinder, all four wheel cylinders, and all three brake hoses. The idea was to flush the steel brake lines with something that will evaporate quickly and not remain in the lines to mix with the new fluid. I think I used acetone, though it may have been lacquer thinner -- both evaporate very quickly.

I squirted a fair amount of the acetone in each brake line at the master cylinder end, then applied some compressed air to expel the solvent. No problems on the line to the front brakes -- some fluid squirted out of the lines where they screw into the rubber brake hoses. But doing the same thing to the rear line didn't go so well. As soon as I applied some air to the rear brake line, there was a "whump" sound (one that we all know well) from the back of the car, and a big flash of yellow light. The acetone had squirted out of the steel brake line attached to the rear axle and made a direct hit on the trouble light I had hanging there. The bulb had broken and had ignited the acetone. The burning acetone had landed on newspaper that I had spread all over the garage floor to catch the brake fluid, and set it on fire. By the time I got back there to see what was going on, the whole area under the gas tank was in flames.[:0] Fortunately, a fire extinguisher was nearby, and the newspaper was consumed pretty quickly anyway. Aside from filling the garage with black smoke, there was no permanent damage.

This was not the only time that I have had a trouble light bulb physically explode, but it was the only time it actually started a fire. I try to treat them with more care these days (and I still keep a fire extinguisher handy).

Skip Lackie

klifton1
10-22-2006, 09:44 AM
Heres a good one.
Back in the mid 60's I had a 66 Olds. convertable and a sand drivway.
You filled the fuel tank behind the lic. plate. I looked out one afternoon to see my 2 year old son helping me, by filling the tank with sand. I ran out and got that stopped but now how do I get the sand out of the neck? I devised a stick with a paddel to get most out but there was still some left. What next??? A canaster vacum cleaner should work. Well it will, untill it ignites the fumes. Wife said it looked like a flying saucer on the end of a hose. She needed a new vacum anyway.
Klif

55 Speedster
42 Champ Coupe

klifton1
10-22-2006, 09:44 AM
Heres a good one.
Back in the mid 60's I had a 66 Olds. convertable and a sand drivway.
You filled the fuel tank behind the lic. plate. I looked out one afternoon to see my 2 year old son helping me, by filling the tank with sand. I ran out and got that stopped but now how do I get the sand out of the neck? I devised a stick with a paddel to get most out but there was still some left. What next??? A canaster vacum cleaner should work. Well it will, untill it ignites the fumes. Wife said it looked like a flying saucer on the end of a hose. She needed a new vacum anyway.
Klif

55 Speedster
42 Champ Coupe

John Kirchhoff
10-22-2006, 10:12 AM
I love it! I'd like to see ET ride home on that vacuum cleaner!

Years ago my dad's memory was going. He'd drained the coolant out of the tractor that fall (something we normally did) but forgot to refill it. I knew nothing of this and the first good day of spring, I headed to the field with it. The temp guage was on the cold peg, but that's what you'd expect with a cold engine. Put it under a good load and shortly I knew it was hot but the gauge still said cold. To make a long story short, I galled a couple of pistons and we got th espring crop in but had to overhaul it afterwards. I think the only thing that saved the Perkins diesel was a 12 quart crankcase and dry sleeves which conducted the heat to the block better. Now that was a real expensive boner!

John Kirchhoff
10-22-2006, 10:12 AM
I love it! I'd like to see ET ride home on that vacuum cleaner!

Years ago my dad's memory was going. He'd drained the coolant out of the tractor that fall (something we normally did) but forgot to refill it. I knew nothing of this and the first good day of spring, I headed to the field with it. The temp guage was on the cold peg, but that's what you'd expect with a cold engine. Put it under a good load and shortly I knew it was hot but the gauge still said cold. To make a long story short, I galled a couple of pistons and we got th espring crop in but had to overhaul it afterwards. I think the only thing that saved the Perkins diesel was a 12 quart crankcase and dry sleeves which conducted the heat to the block better. Now that was a real expensive boner!

John Kirchhoff
10-22-2006, 10:13 AM
I love it! I'd like to see ET ride home on that vacuum cleaner!

Years ago my dad's memory was going. He'd drained the coolant out of the tractor that fall (something we normally did) but forgot to refill it. I knew nothing of this and the first good day of spring, I headed to the field with it. The temp guage was on the cold peg, but that's what you'd expect with a cold engine. Put it under a good load and shortly I knew it was hot but the gauge still said cold. To make a long story short, I galled a couple of pistons and we got th espring crop in but had to overhaul it afterwards. I think the only thing that saved the Perkins diesel was a 12 quart crankcase and dry sleeves which conducted the heat to the block better. Now that was a real expensive boner!

John Kirchhoff
10-22-2006, 10:13 AM
I love it! I'd like to see ET ride home on that vacuum cleaner!

Years ago my dad's memory was going. He'd drained the coolant out of the tractor that fall (something we normally did) but forgot to refill it. I knew nothing of this and the first good day of spring, I headed to the field with it. The temp guage was on the cold peg, but that's what you'd expect with a cold engine. Put it under a good load and shortly I knew it was hot but the gauge still said cold. To make a long story short, I galled a couple of pistons and we got th espring crop in but had to overhaul it afterwards. I think the only thing that saved the Perkins diesel was a 12 quart crankcase and dry sleeves which conducted the heat to the block better. Now that was a real expensive boner!

Guido
10-22-2006, 08:28 PM
Just had one happen today for the first time. On my way to DC early this morning I stopped for gas. Ran the credit card through, got approval, lifted the hose and with the other hand hit the grade selection. Well the last clown had left the lock on the handle and gas shot everywhere. :(

http://thumb14.webshots.net/t/53/453/1/21/36/2964121360097493054pVJTFL_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/57/757/2/88/4/2023288040097493054SEKowB_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/18/19/8/37/21/2050837210097493054IYBJJL_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/59/559/1/43/57/2876143570097493054jKVhDw_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/22/22/0/2/68/2589002680097493054ftBuBw_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/28/28/8/30/30/2075830300097493054aSSlFv_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/59/459/2/23/86/2067223860097493054YoeGMx_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/28/28/5/18/33/2537518330097493054OgEKcN_th.jpg
Guido Salvage - "Where rust is beautiful"

Studebaker horse drawn buggy; 1946 M-16 fire truck; 1948 M-16 grain truck; 1949 2R16A grain truck; 1949 2R17A fire truck; 1950 2R5 pickup; 1952 2R17A grain truck; 1952 Packard 200 4 door; 1955 E-38 grain truck; 1957 3E-40 flatbed; 1961 6E-28 grain truck; 1962 7E-13D 4x4 rack truck; 1962 7E-7 Champ pickup; 1962 GT Hawk 4 speed; 1963 8E-28 flatbed; 1964 Avanti R2 4 speed; 1964 Cruiser and various other "treasures".

Hiding and preserving Studebakers in Richmond, Goochland & Louisa, Va.

Guido
10-22-2006, 08:28 PM
Just had one happen today for the first time. On my way to DC early this morning I stopped for gas. Ran the credit card through, got approval, lifted the hose and with the other hand hit the grade selection. Well the last clown had left the lock on the handle and gas shot everywhere. :(

http://thumb14.webshots.net/t/53/453/1/21/36/2964121360097493054pVJTFL_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/57/757/2/88/4/2023288040097493054SEKowB_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/18/19/8/37/21/2050837210097493054IYBJJL_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/59/559/1/43/57/2876143570097493054jKVhDw_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/22/22/0/2/68/2589002680097493054ftBuBw_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/28/28/8/30/30/2075830300097493054aSSlFv_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/59/459/2/23/86/2067223860097493054YoeGMx_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/28/28/5/18/33/2537518330097493054OgEKcN_th.jpg
Guido Salvage - "Where rust is beautiful"

Studebaker horse drawn buggy; 1946 M-16 fire truck; 1948 M-16 grain truck; 1949 2R16A grain truck; 1949 2R17A fire truck; 1950 2R5 pickup; 1952 2R17A grain truck; 1952 Packard 200 4 door; 1955 E-38 grain truck; 1957 3E-40 flatbed; 1961 6E-28 grain truck; 1962 7E-13D 4x4 rack truck; 1962 7E-7 Champ pickup; 1962 GT Hawk 4 speed; 1963 8E-28 flatbed; 1964 Avanti R2 4 speed; 1964 Cruiser and various other "treasures".

Hiding and preserving Studebakers in Richmond, Goochland & Louisa, Va.

lstude
10-22-2006, 08:42 PM
Around 1979, my wife had a 73 VW "Squareback". A friend an I tuned it up and my friend put in the points. We started it up and it did not run good and it rapidly got worse. We though it had swallowed a valve as VWs were prone to do. We decided to tear down the engine. The valves looked OK, but we replaced them anyway and installed new rings. When we were putting the distributor back on, we noticed that there was a screw that is supposed to hold the points down, loose in the distrubutor. My friend said "oh, that's the screw I was looking for". I still think the loose screw was the only thing wrong with that engine.

Leonard Shepherd, editor, The Commanding Leader, Central Virginia Chapter, http://centralvirginiachapter.org/
http://i99.photobucket.com/albums/l288/lstude/Mein64Daytonasm.jpghttp://i99.photobucket.com/albums/l288/lstude/52inyardsm-1.jpg

lstude
10-22-2006, 08:42 PM
Around 1979, my wife had a 73 VW "Squareback". A friend an I tuned it up and my friend put in the points. We started it up and it did not run good and it rapidly got worse. We though it had swallowed a valve as VWs were prone to do. We decided to tear down the engine. The valves looked OK, but we replaced them anyway and installed new rings. When we were putting the distributor back on, we noticed that there was a screw that is supposed to hold the points down, loose in the distrubutor. My friend said "oh, that's the screw I was looking for". I still think the loose screw was the only thing wrong with that engine.

Leonard Shepherd, editor, The Commanding Leader, Central Virginia Chapter, http://centralvirginiachapter.org/
http://i99.photobucket.com/albums/l288/lstude/Mein64Daytonasm.jpghttp://i99.photobucket.com/albums/l288/lstude/52inyardsm-1.jpg

imported_n/a
10-22-2006, 09:22 PM
I would rather not discuss my bone-headed moves. :(

imported_n/a
10-22-2006, 09:22 PM
I would rather not discuss my bone-headed moves. :(

hank63
10-23-2006, 08:39 AM
Well, I once owned a top condition -64 Hawk, and actually sold it for no special reason. Dummest move I've ever done.
Now I have a -63 Hawk with some rust repairs on the go. I still shake my head when I recall selling that -64.
/H

hank63
10-23-2006, 08:39 AM
Well, I once owned a top condition -64 Hawk, and actually sold it for no special reason. Dummest move I've ever done.
Now I have a -63 Hawk with some rust repairs on the go. I still shake my head when I recall selling that -64.
/H

53k
10-23-2006, 09:07 AM
I have probably done worse than the story below, but this was certainly the most embarrassing.
I bought a late '64 Avanti R-2 automatic from an unsuccessful ebay seller (didn't make his reserve and he took my lower offer). The car was in Castro Valley, California and we had flown out from Baltimore (BWI) one-way to San Jose to pick it up and drive back (buying a one-way ticket immediately after 9/11 was a story in itself). We had spent several days prepping the car for the trip at my friend Bob Peterson's shop and we had stayed with them in their house. Just at the Interstate on-ramp I decided to top off the gas tank so I pulled in to a station. I had never seen a station with an auto diesel hose on the same pump as the gasoline hoses. Anyhow, the result was I got 8+ gallons of diesel in my tank. I started turning down the on ramp when the engine started rattling like crazy and started blowing white smoke. I wheeled back on the street and pulled into a convenience store to get some octane booster (I had no idea that I had "dieseled" the car at that point. I couldn't shut off the engine because it was dieseling so badly and I couldn't kill it with the transmission. Obviously octane booster didn't help so, after driving three or four miles on the interstate, I called Bob and told him we were going to have to stay another day and I limped down to his shop rattling and smoking all the way. At some point along there I figured out what had happened. We ran the car up on his lift and drained 20+ gallons of high test diesel. I guess maybe it was sort of a blessing that this all happened because when we got the car on the lift, the rubber line from the tank to the steel gas line was dripping and we replaced it probably avoiding a serious on-road failure. Then Bob went and got a five-gallon can of high octane gasoline and we poured it in. The car started and in a few minutes was running pretty well. Next day we hit the highway and it was running great with just a wisp of white smoke for a while.
Other than seizing a wheel bearing and ruining the hub and spindle 45 miles east of Winslow, AZ the rest of the trip was uneventful until the last 30 miles when a piston broke and we ended up trailering the car the final few miles. I blamed the piston failure on the severe pre-ignition from my diesel experience, but the man who rebuilt my engine was confident that a cracked vacuum check valve on the master cylinder booster was causing number 5 to run way too lean (the manifold fitting to the booster is right over number 5 on the intake manifold).

[img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/64%20Daytona%20Convertible/Copy%20of%20DaytonaConvert7-20-06.JPG[/img=right]

Paul Johnson
'53 Commander Starliner (since 1966)
'64 Daytona Wagonaire (original owner)
'64 Daytona Convertible (2006)
Museum R-4 engine

53k
10-23-2006, 09:07 AM
I have probably done worse than the story below, but this was certainly the most embarrassing.
I bought a late '64 Avanti R-2 automatic from an unsuccessful ebay seller (didn't make his reserve and he took my lower offer). The car was in Castro Valley, California and we had flown out from Baltimore (BWI) one-way to San Jose to pick it up and drive back (buying a one-way ticket immediately after 9/11 was a story in itself). We had spent several days prepping the car for the trip at my friend Bob Peterson's shop and we had stayed with them in their house. Just at the Interstate on-ramp I decided to top off the gas tank so I pulled in to a station. I had never seen a station with an auto diesel hose on the same pump as the gasoline hoses. Anyhow, the result was I got 8+ gallons of diesel in my tank. I started turning down the on ramp when the engine started rattling like crazy and started blowing white smoke. I wheeled back on the street and pulled into a convenience store to get some octane booster (I had no idea that I had "dieseled" the car at that point. I couldn't shut off the engine because it was dieseling so badly and I couldn't kill it with the transmission. Obviously octane booster didn't help so, after driving three or four miles on the interstate, I called Bob and told him we were going to have to stay another day and I limped down to his shop rattling and smoking all the way. At some point along there I figured out what had happened. We ran the car up on his lift and drained 20+ gallons of high test diesel. I guess maybe it was sort of a blessing that this all happened because when we got the car on the lift, the rubber line from the tank to the steel gas line was dripping and we replaced it probably avoiding a serious on-road failure. Then Bob went and got a five-gallon can of high octane gasoline and we poured it in. The car started and in a few minutes was running pretty well. Next day we hit the highway and it was running great with just a wisp of white smoke for a while.
Other than seizing a wheel bearing and ruining the hub and spindle 45 miles east of Winslow, AZ the rest of the trip was uneventful until the last 30 miles when a piston broke and we ended up trailering the car the final few miles. I blamed the piston failure on the severe pre-ignition from my diesel experience, but the man who rebuilt my engine was confident that a cracked vacuum check valve on the master cylinder booster was causing number 5 to run way too lean (the manifold fitting to the booster is right over number 5 on the intake manifold).

[img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/64%20Daytona%20Convertible/Copy%20of%20DaytonaConvert7-20-06.JPG[/img=right]

Paul Johnson
'53 Commander Starliner (since 1966)
'64 Daytona Wagonaire (original owner)
'64 Daytona Convertible (2006)
Museum R-4 engine

S_Ferrell
10-23-2006, 09:58 AM
My father worked in the auto business, he was personnel director for the Brookpark Ohio Ford plant, but he did not care for cars that much, to him it was just a job. Which ment that I had to teach myself auto maintence.

In 1978, I purchased my first decent car, 1976 Gremlin. I changed the oil for the first time and left the O ring from the old filter on the block. I installed the new filter and now I have two O rings on the block. My father came out to the driveway in a light tan suit, he was taking my mother to dinner. He asked me to move the Gremlin so he could get his 1974 Galaxie out. I started the engine and drenched my father head to foot with oil coming out from under the car. My father then told me that I was too stupid to work on cars and to let a professional do it. It wasnt until 2000 that I opened the hood of a car again.

S_Ferrell
10-23-2006, 09:58 AM
My father worked in the auto business, he was personnel director for the Brookpark Ohio Ford plant, but he did not care for cars that much, to him it was just a job. Which ment that I had to teach myself auto maintence.

In 1978, I purchased my first decent car, 1976 Gremlin. I changed the oil for the first time and left the O ring from the old filter on the block. I installed the new filter and now I have two O rings on the block. My father came out to the driveway in a light tan suit, he was taking my mother to dinner. He asked me to move the Gremlin so he could get his 1974 Galaxie out. I started the engine and drenched my father head to foot with oil coming out from under the car. My father then told me that I was too stupid to work on cars and to let a professional do it. It wasnt until 2000 that I opened the hood of a car again.

Blue 15G
10-23-2006, 10:36 AM
S Ferrel, I did the same thing years ago on a slant six Plymouth Scamp I had. Didn't see that the old filter gasket stayed stuck on the filter base. It was a real mess to clean up.

The one I did that I'm least proud of I could excuse due to youthful stupidity I suppose. I had a '55 DeSoto I got from my uncle and the weep hole in the fuel pump started spraying gasoline out. At the time, I was a young student, no money, no car repair experience, no nothing.

But I did have an empty coffee can, so I fabricated a deflector to put over the pump so as I drove the gas would leak out onto the road instead of spraying the engine. But the can would often fall out and I got tired of stopping to pick it up.

So I got the brilliant idea of putting a sheet metal screw into the hole to stop the leak. After driving the car a short while like this, I noticed the car was losing power something terrible. I finally went to see our mechanic to describe what I had done. After slapping me around, he told me to go home and fix it right, and told me what to do to make it right.

When I removed the oil drain plug, the force of the gas-filled oil nearly knocked the plug from my hand. The pan filled super quickly so I had to run to get another....and another!

Funny thing, after replacing the pump and changing the oil the car suffered no permanent damage. It's still an embarrassing story to tell!

Blue 15G
10-23-2006, 10:36 AM
S Ferrel, I did the same thing years ago on a slant six Plymouth Scamp I had. Didn't see that the old filter gasket stayed stuck on the filter base. It was a real mess to clean up.

The one I did that I'm least proud of I could excuse due to youthful stupidity I suppose. I had a '55 DeSoto I got from my uncle and the weep hole in the fuel pump started spraying gasoline out. At the time, I was a young student, no money, no car repair experience, no nothing.

But I did have an empty coffee can, so I fabricated a deflector to put over the pump so as I drove the gas would leak out onto the road instead of spraying the engine. But the can would often fall out and I got tired of stopping to pick it up.

So I got the brilliant idea of putting a sheet metal screw into the hole to stop the leak. After driving the car a short while like this, I noticed the car was losing power something terrible. I finally went to see our mechanic to describe what I had done. After slapping me around, he told me to go home and fix it right, and told me what to do to make it right.

When I removed the oil drain plug, the force of the gas-filled oil nearly knocked the plug from my hand. The pan filled super quickly so I had to run to get another....and another!

Funny thing, after replacing the pump and changing the oil the car suffered no permanent damage. It's still an embarrassing story to tell!

StudeRich
10-23-2006, 10:55 AM
Just finished welding up a new rear body panel on a 70 Mustang convertable, seam sealed the trunk, and put 'correct' undercoating in there. NEXT morning:noticed a spot weld not done. ah, just a quick zap to finish it off. The fumes from the sealer/undercoating are very present in this tight space and the quick weld lit the whole trunk on fire like a bar b que. I flipped the helmet back and franticly tried to put it out. A mustang has a rear fill very much like a 64 stude , only this tank sits IN this trunk. Flames growing all around it.

Only a little duct tape over this hole while repairs were getting done! Fire going really good now... Duct tape melting....... My air blower just blows the molten sealer all around. need something else quick!

As an erie blue flame danced all around, (vapors) bigger, yellow flames were now on the actual sealer. I wondered as I watched the duct tape melt from the gas tank tube if I should be standing here. whew, close one. Fire is out.......

Air blower, welding blanket, and wet rags did the trick. always have them, and expect fire, even if you are just doing a quick job.... my motto, even before this fire. I have 1 extinguiser on EACH side of the car too and was ready. ALWAYS BE READY.

MIKE

StudeRich
10-23-2006, 10:55 AM
Just finished welding up a new rear body panel on a 70 Mustang convertable, seam sealed the trunk, and put 'correct' undercoating in there. NEXT morning:noticed a spot weld not done. ah, just a quick zap to finish it off. The fumes from the sealer/undercoating are very present in this tight space and the quick weld lit the whole trunk on fire like a bar b que. I flipped the helmet back and franticly tried to put it out. A mustang has a rear fill very much like a 64 stude , only this tank sits IN this trunk. Flames growing all around it.

Only a little duct tape over this hole while repairs were getting done! Fire going really good now... Duct tape melting....... My air blower just blows the molten sealer all around. need something else quick!

As an erie blue flame danced all around, (vapors) bigger, yellow flames were now on the actual sealer. I wondered as I watched the duct tape melt from the gas tank tube if I should be standing here. whew, close one. Fire is out.......

Air blower, welding blanket, and wet rags did the trick. always have them, and expect fire, even if you are just doing a quick job.... my motto, even before this fire. I have 1 extinguiser on EACH side of the car too and was ready. ALWAYS BE READY.

MIKE

Guido
10-23-2006, 11:08 AM
quote:Originally posted by Packebaker

I would rather not discuss my bone-headed moves. :(

Do any of them involve rented Impala's? :D If so, we want the details!

http://thumb14.webshots.net/t/53/453/1/21/36/2964121360097493054pVJTFL_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/57/757/2/88/4/2023288040097493054SEKowB_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/18/19/8/37/21/2050837210097493054IYBJJL_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/59/559/1/43/57/2876143570097493054jKVhDw_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/22/22/0/2/68/2589002680097493054ftBuBw_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/28/28/8/30/30/2075830300097493054aSSlFv_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/59/459/2/23/86/2067223860097493054YoeGMx_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/28/28/5/18/33/2537518330097493054OgEKcN_th.jpg
Guido Salvage - "Where rust is beautiful"

Studebaker horse drawn buggy; 1946 M-16 fire truck; 1948 M-16 grain truck; 1949 2R16A grain truck; 1949 2R17A fire truck; 1950 2R5 pickup; 1952 2R17A grain truck; 1952 Packard 200 4 door; 1955 E-38 grain truck; 1957 3E-40 flatbed; 1961 6E-28 grain truck; 1962 7E-13D 4x4 rack truck; 1962 7E-7 Champ pickup; 1962 GT Hawk 4 speed; 1963 8E-28 flatbed; 1964 Avanti R2 4 speed; 1964 Cruiser and various other "treasures".

Hiding and preserving Studebakers in Richmond, Goochland & Louisa, Va.

Guido
10-23-2006, 11:08 AM
quote:Originally posted by Packebaker

I would rather not discuss my bone-headed moves. :(

Do any of them involve rented Impala's? :D If so, we want the details!

http://thumb14.webshots.net/t/53/453/1/21/36/2964121360097493054pVJTFL_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/57/757/2/88/4/2023288040097493054SEKowB_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/18/19/8/37/21/2050837210097493054IYBJJL_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/59/559/1/43/57/2876143570097493054jKVhDw_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/22/22/0/2/68/2589002680097493054ftBuBw_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/28/28/8/30/30/2075830300097493054aSSlFv_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/59/459/2/23/86/2067223860097493054YoeGMx_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/28/28/5/18/33/2537518330097493054OgEKcN_th.jpg
Guido Salvage - "Where rust is beautiful"

Studebaker horse drawn buggy; 1946 M-16 fire truck; 1948 M-16 grain truck; 1949 2R16A grain truck; 1949 2R17A fire truck; 1950 2R5 pickup; 1952 2R17A grain truck; 1952 Packard 200 4 door; 1955 E-38 grain truck; 1957 3E-40 flatbed; 1961 6E-28 grain truck; 1962 7E-13D 4x4 rack truck; 1962 7E-7 Champ pickup; 1962 GT Hawk 4 speed; 1963 8E-28 flatbed; 1964 Avanti R2 4 speed; 1964 Cruiser and various other "treasures".

Hiding and preserving Studebakers in Richmond, Goochland & Louisa, Va.

Guido
10-23-2006, 11:26 AM
With a Studebaker it has to be what I did last Thanksgiving. I was using my '62 4x4 to cut and haul firewood for my mother. The temperature fell below freezing overnight and the gas line froze. Being impatient and the genius I am I went to the local FLAPS and bought a 2.5 gallon can, 10 feet of neoprene tubing and a couple of clamps.

Set the full portable can in the back, hooked up the rubber hose and off I went. Filled the truck with wood, started down the mountain and within 15 feet there was a bright flash and explosion under the hood and flames coming through the pedal holes. I did not have a fire extinguisher in the truck and now the dried leaves under the truck were going to beat the band.

I am in a panic as I spent 30 years looking for a Stude 4x4 and have no insurance on it and it is burning in front of my eyes. My only fire fighting tool was my coveralls so I ripped them off and tried to smother the flames. It took a couple of long minutes but I got them out.

While this had been going on my wife had gone back to my mother's house and returned in my Explorer which did have an extinguisher. Still not being too bright, I decided to start the truck to see if it was okay. Same result as before, but this time the breather cap shot off the hood and into the radiator. Used up the entire fire extinguisher and still had to beat out the flames with my coveralls, but this time the fire started the floor mat on fire. Finally got everything put out and the truck was saved. [:0]

My act of stupidity? Instead of hooking up to the fuel pump I did so at the carb and also didn't disconnect the fuel supply. As the day warmed up the fuel line unfroze and as a result sprayed raw fuel all over the engine.

Turned out to be an expensive bonehead move. [xx(]

http://thumb14.webshots.net/t/53/453/1/21/36/2964121360097493054pVJTFL_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/57/757/2/88/4/2023288040097493054SEKowB_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/18/19/8/37/21/2050837210097493054IYBJJL_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/59/559/1/43/57/2876143570097493054jKVhDw_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/22/22/0/2/68/2589002680097493054ftBuBw_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/28/28/8/30/30/2075830300097493054aSSlFv_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/59/459/2/23/86/2067223860097493054YoeGMx_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/28/28/5/18/33/2537518330097493054OgEKcN_th.jpg
Guido Salvage - "Where rust is beautiful"

Studebaker horse drawn buggy; 1946 M-16 fire truck; 1948 M-16 grain truck; 1949 2R16A grain truck; 1949 2R17A fire truck; 1950 2R5 pickup; 1952 2R17A grain truck; 1952 Packard 200 4 door; 1955 E-38 grain truck; 1957 3E-40 flatbed; 1961 6E-28 grain truck; 1962 7E-13D 4x4 rack truck; 1962 7E-7 Champ pickup; 1962 GT Hawk 4 speed; 1963 8E-28 flatbed; 1964 Avanti R2 4 speed; 1964 Cruiser and various other "treasures".

Hiding and preserving Studebakers in Richmond, Goochland & Louisa, Va.

Guido
10-23-2006, 11:26 AM
With a Studebaker it has to be what I did last Thanksgiving. I was using my '62 4x4 to cut and haul firewood for my mother. The temperature fell below freezing overnight and the gas line froze. Being impatient and the genius I am I went to the local FLAPS and bought a 2.5 gallon can, 10 feet of neoprene tubing and a couple of clamps.

Set the full portable can in the back, hooked up the rubber hose and off I went. Filled the truck with wood, started down the mountain and within 15 feet there was a bright flash and explosion under the hood and flames coming through the pedal holes. I did not have a fire extinguisher in the truck and now the dried leaves under the truck were going to beat the band.

I am in a panic as I spent 30 years looking for a Stude 4x4 and have no insurance on it and it is burning in front of my eyes. My only fire fighting tool was my coveralls so I ripped them off and tried to smother the flames. It took a couple of long minutes but I got them out.

While this had been going on my wife had gone back to my mother's house and returned in my Explorer which did have an extinguisher. Still not being too bright, I decided to start the truck to see if it was okay. Same result as before, but this time the breather cap shot off the hood and into the radiator. Used up the entire fire extinguisher and still had to beat out the flames with my coveralls, but this time the fire started the floor mat on fire. Finally got everything put out and the truck was saved. [:0]

My act of stupidity? Instead of hooking up to the fuel pump I did so at the carb and also didn't disconnect the fuel supply. As the day warmed up the fuel line unfroze and as a result sprayed raw fuel all over the engine.

Turned out to be an expensive bonehead move. [xx(]

http://thumb14.webshots.net/t/53/453/1/21/36/2964121360097493054pVJTFL_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/57/757/2/88/4/2023288040097493054SEKowB_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/18/19/8/37/21/2050837210097493054IYBJJL_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/59/559/1/43/57/2876143570097493054jKVhDw_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/22/22/0/2/68/2589002680097493054ftBuBw_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/28/28/8/30/30/2075830300097493054aSSlFv_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/59/459/2/23/86/2067223860097493054YoeGMx_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/28/28/5/18/33/2537518330097493054OgEKcN_th.jpg
Guido Salvage - "Where rust is beautiful"

Studebaker horse drawn buggy; 1946 M-16 fire truck; 1948 M-16 grain truck; 1949 2R16A grain truck; 1949 2R17A fire truck; 1950 2R5 pickup; 1952 2R17A grain truck; 1952 Packard 200 4 door; 1955 E-38 grain truck; 1957 3E-40 flatbed; 1961 6E-28 grain truck; 1962 7E-13D 4x4 rack truck; 1962 7E-7 Champ pickup; 1962 GT Hawk 4 speed; 1963 8E-28 flatbed; 1964 Avanti R2 4 speed; 1964 Cruiser and various other "treasures".

Hiding and preserving Studebakers in Richmond, Goochland & Louisa, Va.

John Kirchhoff
10-23-2006, 12:10 PM
Mike's discussion made me think about safety. I've always tried hard to be safe when working around farm machinery. Well when you get in a hurry, you sometimes do something really stupid. Several years ago I was mowing hay, it was nearly evening and the dew was starting to settle (can't mow wet hay). I plugged the hay conditioner up and got off to unplug it. I always shut the tractor off but for some reason I didn't this time. The power take off has multiple disc wet clutch which sometimes decides to turn a few times evenwhen shut off. Well you know what happened, pulling grass out, reached in and the sickle made a couple of swipes back and forth and I pulled out a bloody finger. I was expecting a bloody stump, but there was some skin still holding it on. Drove to the house, wrapped a paper towel around it and drove to the emergency room. While setting there in the ER, my (ex) wife came in to see the carnage. Anyone who's been married to a nurse knows how unsympathetic they can be. She leaned against the doorjamb and said "Well it look like Mr. Safety screwed up!" I guess the point I'm making is to try to not get in such a big hurry that you forget your own safety. Mike's burned out car could have been replaced, but Mike couldn't had the gas tank exploded.

John Kirchhoff
10-23-2006, 12:10 PM
Mike's discussion made me think about safety. I've always tried hard to be safe when working around farm machinery. Well when you get in a hurry, you sometimes do something really stupid. Several years ago I was mowing hay, it was nearly evening and the dew was starting to settle (can't mow wet hay). I plugged the hay conditioner up and got off to unplug it. I always shut the tractor off but for some reason I didn't this time. The power take off has multiple disc wet clutch which sometimes decides to turn a few times evenwhen shut off. Well you know what happened, pulling grass out, reached in and the sickle made a couple of swipes back and forth and I pulled out a bloody finger. I was expecting a bloody stump, but there was some skin still holding it on. Drove to the house, wrapped a paper towel around it and drove to the emergency room. While setting there in the ER, my (ex) wife came in to see the carnage. Anyone who's been married to a nurse knows how unsympathetic they can be. She leaned against the doorjamb and said "Well it look like Mr. Safety screwed up!" I guess the point I'm making is to try to not get in such a big hurry that you forget your own safety. Mike's burned out car could have been replaced, but Mike couldn't had the gas tank exploded.

65cruiser
10-23-2006, 12:22 PM
A few years back I bought a 1987 Dodge 600 from my wifes uncle, mostly to be used as a beater. It really wasn't a bad looking car, but had a few dings here and there. The engine was a greasy mess. So, I decided to degrease the engine. I stopped at FLAPS and bought a can of engine degreaser, then drove to one of those DIY carwashes. I pulled into the bay, popped the hood, and gunked the engine down real good. It said to use on a warm engine[:p]

The flash fire from the degreaser hitting the exhaust manifold surprised me and singed my eyebrows[B)], and now the grease on the engine was burning like mad[}:)]. I grabbed the sprayer and dove into my pocket for quarters, but had none. I had to run to the change machine, get change, put the quarters in, then put the fire out with the car wash wand.

Amazingly, nothing was damaged except my pride[:I]

________________________
Mark Anderson
1965 Cruiser
http://home.alltel.net/anderm

http://home.alltel.net/anderm/images/smstude.jpg

65cruiser
10-23-2006, 12:22 PM
A few years back I bought a 1987 Dodge 600 from my wifes uncle, mostly to be used as a beater. It really wasn't a bad looking car, but had a few dings here and there. The engine was a greasy mess. So, I decided to degrease the engine. I stopped at FLAPS and bought a can of engine degreaser, then drove to one of those DIY carwashes. I pulled into the bay, popped the hood, and gunked the engine down real good. It said to use on a warm engine[:p]

The flash fire from the degreaser hitting the exhaust manifold surprised me and singed my eyebrows[B)], and now the grease on the engine was burning like mad[}:)]. I grabbed the sprayer and dove into my pocket for quarters, but had none. I had to run to the change machine, get change, put the quarters in, then put the fire out with the car wash wand.

Amazingly, nothing was damaged except my pride[:I]

________________________
Mark Anderson
1965 Cruiser
http://home.alltel.net/anderm

http://home.alltel.net/anderm/images/smstude.jpg

Skip Lackie
10-23-2006, 02:06 PM
The above stories about oil filters reminds me of another. I had a 59 Lark V8 with the usual partial-flow filter mounted on the top of the engine. Someone had replaced the high-pressure line that fed the filter with a rubber line that was so long it had a loop in it. I was able to buy the correct Stude hose and decided to replace it the next time I changed the oil. Just as I got the hose off the filter, my wife asked me to move the Stude so she could get her car out of the garage. I had already removed the filter cartridge, so decided to just stick the end of the hose down in the oil filler pipe at the front of the intake manifold -- after all, all I had to do was move the car 25 feet.

As soon as I started the engine, the oil blasting from that hose pushed it up out of the oil filler pipe.[:0] As it gracefully unwound its coil, it rotated horizontally about 180 degrees and slowly sprayed the driveway and side of the house with oil. Anyone old enough to have seen how the death ray gun emerges from the Martian capsule in the 1950s movie The War of the Worlds will have the picture just right. Fortunately, my wife was out of the line of fire.[:I] The crankcase was emptied in about 10 seconds. I shut the engine down immediately and there was no apparent damage. But there are still oil stains on the brick wall, 20 years later.
Skip Lackie

Skip Lackie
10-23-2006, 02:06 PM
The above stories about oil filters reminds me of another. I had a 59 Lark V8 with the usual partial-flow filter mounted on the top of the engine. Someone had replaced the high-pressure line that fed the filter with a rubber line that was so long it had a loop in it. I was able to buy the correct Stude hose and decided to replace it the next time I changed the oil. Just as I got the hose off the filter, my wife asked me to move the Stude so she could get her car out of the garage. I had already removed the filter cartridge, so decided to just stick the end of the hose down in the oil filler pipe at the front of the intake manifold -- after all, all I had to do was move the car 25 feet.

As soon as I started the engine, the oil blasting from that hose pushed it up out of the oil filler pipe.[:0] As it gracefully unwound its coil, it rotated horizontally about 180 degrees and slowly sprayed the driveway and side of the house with oil. Anyone old enough to have seen how the death ray gun emerges from the Martian capsule in the 1950s movie The War of the Worlds will have the picture just right. Fortunately, my wife was out of the line of fire.[:I] The crankcase was emptied in about 10 seconds. I shut the engine down immediately and there was no apparent damage. But there are still oil stains on the brick wall, 20 years later.
Skip Lackie

JDP
10-23-2006, 04:27 PM
OK, I have more. I went to sit down in the grass and picked up a screwdriver that was in my way. I casually tossed it over me shoulder and into the radiator core on a opened hooded Hawk parked behind me. I should have known better since years before I performed the same trick with a pocket knife into a spray can. ( try doing that on if you wanted to)
N8 holds the records for blowing up spray cans by driving over them backing out of my garage. One paint can, one Kroil and one carb cleaner so far.:)

http://stude.com/sig.jpg
Studebaker On The Net
http://stude.com
Studebaker News Group
http://groups.google.com/group/alt.autos.studebaker
Arnold Md.
64 Daytona HT
63 R2 4 speed GT Hawk
63 Avanti R1/AC
63 Lark 2 dr.
62 Lark 2 door
60 Lark convert
60 Hawk
59 3E Truck
56 truck
55 Starlight
53 Starlight
52 Starliner
51 Commander

JDP
10-23-2006, 04:27 PM
OK, I have more. I went to sit down in the grass and picked up a screwdriver that was in my way. I casually tossed it over me shoulder and into the radiator core on a opened hooded Hawk parked behind me. I should have known better since years before I performed the same trick with a pocket knife into a spray can. ( try doing that on if you wanted to)
N8 holds the records for blowing up spray cans by driving over them backing out of my garage. One paint can, one Kroil and one carb cleaner so far.:)

http://stude.com/sig.jpg
Studebaker On The Net
http://stude.com
Studebaker News Group
http://groups.google.com/group/alt.autos.studebaker
Arnold Md.
64 Daytona HT
63 R2 4 speed GT Hawk
63 Avanti R1/AC
63 Lark 2 dr.
62 Lark 2 door
60 Lark convert
60 Hawk
59 3E Truck
56 truck
55 Starlight
53 Starlight
52 Starliner
51 Commander

showbizkid
10-23-2006, 04:59 PM
Couple of years ago I was working under the hood on my '67 LeMans, which lives under a cover in the garage. I had pulled the car cover back to the cowl.

I finished working and went to close the hood, but it wouldn't close all the way; the car cover had gotten into the gap between the hood and cowl. So instead of opening the hood up fully and pulling the fabric out of the gap, I left the hood at half-mast and went back to clear the jam. As I got the last of the cover out, the hood closed the rest of the way, catching three fingers on my right hand between the hood and cowl, and hooking the safety latch.

I yelled for my wife to help, but she didn't know how to operate the latch. It took about 5 minutes of me being very, very calm [:0] to explain to her how to get me out of there.

When we finally got the hood open, a good 3/8" line of skin on my fingers had been compressed down to the bone. They stayed that way, numb and tingly, for 3 days before even beginning to feel normal again.


[img=left]http://members.cox.net/clarknovak/lark.gif[/img=left]

Clark in San Diego
'63 F2/Lark Standard
http://studeblogger.blogspot.com

showbizkid
10-23-2006, 04:59 PM
Couple of years ago I was working under the hood on my '67 LeMans, which lives under a cover in the garage. I had pulled the car cover back to the cowl.

I finished working and went to close the hood, but it wouldn't close all the way; the car cover had gotten into the gap between the hood and cowl. So instead of opening the hood up fully and pulling the fabric out of the gap, I left the hood at half-mast and went back to clear the jam. As I got the last of the cover out, the hood closed the rest of the way, catching three fingers on my right hand between the hood and cowl, and hooking the safety latch.

I yelled for my wife to help, but she didn't know how to operate the latch. It took about 5 minutes of me being very, very calm [:0] to explain to her how to get me out of there.

When we finally got the hood open, a good 3/8" line of skin on my fingers had been compressed down to the bone. They stayed that way, numb and tingly, for 3 days before even beginning to feel normal again.


[img=left]http://members.cox.net/clarknovak/lark.gif[/img=left]

Clark in San Diego
'63 F2/Lark Standard
http://studeblogger.blogspot.com

clarkwd
05-22-2007, 10:12 AM
Did you ever wonder how far a Dana 44 would go with no oil? My log book shows I assembled the rear end on Feb 28, 2004, but I never added a line to my punch list to fill it with oil. Although I was under the car for a hundred hours or more, whenever I noticed the differential drain plug it was weeping of oil, so I blew off checking it. I drove home Friday night about 25 miles and after dinner went for a ride around the block. The wheels locked up at odometer reading 27.8 miles at about 35 mph and a neighbor with a skidder dragged it out of the road and onto my trailer and I was able to get it into my garage without damage. When I got it apart, the front pinion and the carrier bearings were ok, but the ring and pinion was pretty rough and the rear pinion bearing had disassembled itself and left pieces of the cage buried on the inner and outer race. My mentor called Monday morning and asked if he could bring friends over to see the car and I asked him if he could bring a new rear end. Its good to have understanding friends.
Bill

clarkwd
05-22-2007, 10:12 AM
Did you ever wonder how far a Dana 44 would go with no oil? My log book shows I assembled the rear end on Feb 28, 2004, but I never added a line to my punch list to fill it with oil. Although I was under the car for a hundred hours or more, whenever I noticed the differential drain plug it was weeping of oil, so I blew off checking it. I drove home Friday night about 25 miles and after dinner went for a ride around the block. The wheels locked up at odometer reading 27.8 miles at about 35 mph and a neighbor with a skidder dragged it out of the road and onto my trailer and I was able to get it into my garage without damage. When I got it apart, the front pinion and the carrier bearings were ok, but the ring and pinion was pretty rough and the rear pinion bearing had disassembled itself and left pieces of the cage buried on the inner and outer race. My mentor called Monday morning and asked if he could bring friends over to see the car and I asked him if he could bring a new rear end. Its good to have understanding friends.
Bill

Scott
05-22-2007, 10:54 AM
Well I've done some things, but the ace mechanic who took out and reinstalled the engine in my 1962 Hawk after it was rebuilt really did some bright things. Among them were using the old original PCV valve on the car after reinstalling the engine, causing back pressure and oil splattered all over the nicely detailed engine. In cleaning it up he really messed up the new yellow valve cover paint. After getting the car home it was running weird so I took it to a local mechanic. They checked the plugs and found one with basically no gap. When I called the ace mechanic about it he said he must have dropped it and forgot to look and see if it got messed up.

But the coup de grace was when my wife and I and our two children (ages 4 and 6) drove the 80 miles one way to get the car. We got to the town where the ace mechanic lives - which, by the way is 10 miles from the nearest gas station. I got in the car and looked at the gas gauge. It said it was practically empty. So Mr. Ace Mechanic says, "Well it should be enough to get you to the next town". It got me approximately 1 mile out of his town. We had to turn around (in the car we drove there), get a gas can from the mechanic, make the 20 mile roundtrip to get the gas, come back, put it in the car, return the can to the ace mechanic - then go back to the hawk and continue home. When I asked him why he didn't put more gas in the tank, he just said he only leaves what's in the tank when he gets the car. I told him a GOOD mechanic would never risk stranding his customer by not at least making sure there were a few gallons of gas in the tank. I think he just sort of shrugged.
Talk about BONEHEADED!

Oh yeah, I just remembered that this mechanic also chose to reinstall the old spark plugs after the engine was rebuilt. Yes, they might work, but wouldn't it make sense to start out with new, fresh plugs on a rebuilt engine??

Scott
05-22-2007, 10:54 AM
Well I've done some things, but the ace mechanic who took out and reinstalled the engine in my 1962 Hawk after it was rebuilt really did some bright things. Among them were using the old original PCV valve on the car after reinstalling the engine, causing back pressure and oil splattered all over the nicely detailed engine. In cleaning it up he really messed up the new yellow valve cover paint. After getting the car home it was running weird so I took it to a local mechanic. They checked the plugs and found one with basically no gap. When I called the ace mechanic about it he said he must have dropped it and forgot to look and see if it got messed up.

But the coup de grace was when my wife and I and our two children (ages 4 and 6) drove the 80 miles one way to get the car. We got to the town where the ace mechanic lives - which, by the way is 10 miles from the nearest gas station. I got in the car and looked at the gas gauge. It said it was practically empty. So Mr. Ace Mechanic says, "Well it should be enough to get you to the next town". It got me approximately 1 mile out of his town. We had to turn around (in the car we drove there), get a gas can from the mechanic, make the 20 mile roundtrip to get the gas, come back, put it in the car, return the can to the ace mechanic - then go back to the hawk and continue home. When I asked him why he didn't put more gas in the tank, he just said he only leaves what's in the tank when he gets the car. I told him a GOOD mechanic would never risk stranding his customer by not at least making sure there were a few gallons of gas in the tank. I think he just sort of shrugged.
Talk about BONEHEADED!

Oh yeah, I just remembered that this mechanic also chose to reinstall the old spark plugs after the engine was rebuilt. Yes, they might work, but wouldn't it make sense to start out with new, fresh plugs on a rebuilt engine??

Johnnywiffer
05-22-2007, 12:04 PM
When I was a senior in HS, my father let me buy a ’41 Chevy from my girl friend’s brother. (Actually I think I traded a calf for it.) It had a rod knock (the car, not the calf) among other things but I assume my father felt it would not go very fast, NOR very far.

I then learned there was a hole in the fuel pick up inside the gas tank, so when it got ¼ full, unless you did all your driving on a very steep hill, it was outta gas. High school seniors have little money, so it seemed it was always JUST above ¼.

I solved that problem one Sunday when it actually DID stop in traffic. I was WITH that girl friend and wanted to get to the dance or the drive-in or SOMEWHERE, so I just cut the fuel line between the fuel pump and the tank, walked a short distance to a gas station, found a gallon jug, bought a gallon and ran the fuel line thru the firewall into the passenger compartment. Bent the fuel line into the jug and we were off. The metal fuel line was stiff enough that it kinda held the jug from tipping when we went around corners and if you kept your feet in JUST the right place, everything ran pretty well.

I stocked up on jugs and kept a few (depending on my cash flow) full ones in the back seat floor, tied down with an old rope. Since neither of us smoked, except for the constant smell of gas and the rod knock, things were pretty much OK. And if you kept your eye on the jug, unless it was dark, you could know when to change.

But one of my friend’s DID smoke. Bill and I would double date frequently and when HE couldn’t get his father’s '39 Dodge and I couldn’t get my father’s ’52 Land Cruiser, we were off in the ’41. After all, as they say, 10% of SOMETHING is better than 100% of NOTHING!

One unforgettable night, we were at the drive-in movie and Bill just HAD to smoke. It was drizzling and he didn’t want to get outside, so he lit up, shook the match out and casually dropped it on the floor. I guess one of the jugs had leaked because IMMEDIATELY a flame JUMPED up from the floor. But, just as immediately WAS GONE. The car was filled with smoke and we all piled out as fast as nudists in a mosquito invasion. Other people around us began jumping out of THEIR cars, too, until, if you didn’t look too closely, it looked like we were having a barbecue! Smoke and people. One guy said, “What was that?” Bill said, “I think it was aliens!”

This was IN the ‘50s when aliens were big news. A general hubbub ensued with “Aliens?” and “Where are they?” and other questions floating around the drive-in. We finally got back in the car, very damp by then and not really in a very good mood. We finished the movie and went home but not before I put the jugs into the trunk and tied them down as well as possible. The car ALWAYS smelled of the smoke from our little escapade after that and there was a scorched place on the headliner as a reminder of that night.

I have another story about Bill. His father worked in a front end shop and my father’s Land Cruiser was in need of front end work. It was out of warrantee by then (I think they had a 15 minute warrantee in ’52) and Bill’s father suggested that I have my father bring the car into his shop and he’d have a look at it.

He installed new shocks and aligned the front end and it was really pretty good after that. One night, Bill and I were out in the Land Cruiser, “catting’ around, as 16-year-olds are wont to do. We had finished talking about girls and sex and were on the subject of cars.

He told me that his father had said that my father’s Land Cruiser was made so bad it was a wonder it held together AT ALL. Especially the brakes. Of course, this was in the days before seat belts. So when I said, “Oh yeah?” and jammed on the brakes, Bill just flew into the windshield head first. We screeched to a halt, Bill rubbing his head. “What the hell did you do that for?” he moaned. “Just checking to see if your father was right? Guess not.” His head had cracked the glass but didn’t go thru it.

When I told my father the circumstances, h

Johnnywiffer
05-22-2007, 12:04 PM
When I was a senior in HS, my father let me buy a ’41 Chevy from my girl friend’s brother. (Actually I think I traded a calf for it.) It had a rod knock (the car, not the calf) among other things but I assume my father felt it would not go very fast, NOR very far.

I then learned there was a hole in the fuel pick up inside the gas tank, so when it got ¼ full, unless you did all your driving on a very steep hill, it was outta gas. High school seniors have little money, so it seemed it was always JUST above ¼.

I solved that problem one Sunday when it actually DID stop in traffic. I was WITH that girl friend and wanted to get to the dance or the drive-in or SOMEWHERE, so I just cut the fuel line between the fuel pump and the tank, walked a short distance to a gas station, found a gallon jug, bought a gallon and ran the fuel line thru the firewall into the passenger compartment. Bent the fuel line into the jug and we were off. The metal fuel line was stiff enough that it kinda held the jug from tipping when we went around corners and if you kept your feet in JUST the right place, everything ran pretty well.

I stocked up on jugs and kept a few (depending on my cash flow) full ones in the back seat floor, tied down with an old rope. Since neither of us smoked, except for the constant smell of gas and the rod knock, things were pretty much OK. And if you kept your eye on the jug, unless it was dark, you could know when to change.

But one of my friend’s DID smoke. Bill and I would double date frequently and when HE couldn’t get his father’s '39 Dodge and I couldn’t get my father’s ’52 Land Cruiser, we were off in the ’41. After all, as they say, 10% of SOMETHING is better than 100% of NOTHING!

One unforgettable night, we were at the drive-in movie and Bill just HAD to smoke. It was drizzling and he didn’t want to get outside, so he lit up, shook the match out and casually dropped it on the floor. I guess one of the jugs had leaked because IMMEDIATELY a flame JUMPED up from the floor. But, just as immediately WAS GONE. The car was filled with smoke and we all piled out as fast as nudists in a mosquito invasion. Other people around us began jumping out of THEIR cars, too, until, if you didn’t look too closely, it looked like we were having a barbecue! Smoke and people. One guy said, “What was that?” Bill said, “I think it was aliens!”

This was IN the ‘50s when aliens were big news. A general hubbub ensued with “Aliens?” and “Where are they?” and other questions floating around the drive-in. We finally got back in the car, very damp by then and not really in a very good mood. We finished the movie and went home but not before I put the jugs into the trunk and tied them down as well as possible. The car ALWAYS smelled of the smoke from our little escapade after that and there was a scorched place on the headliner as a reminder of that night.

I have another story about Bill. His father worked in a front end shop and my father’s Land Cruiser was in need of front end work. It was out of warrantee by then (I think they had a 15 minute warrantee in ’52) and Bill’s father suggested that I have my father bring the car into his shop and he’d have a look at it.

He installed new shocks and aligned the front end and it was really pretty good after that. One night, Bill and I were out in the Land Cruiser, “catting’ around, as 16-year-olds are wont to do. We had finished talking about girls and sex and were on the subject of cars.

He told me that his father had said that my father’s Land Cruiser was made so bad it was a wonder it held together AT ALL. Especially the brakes. Of course, this was in the days before seat belts. So when I said, “Oh yeah?” and jammed on the brakes, Bill just flew into the windshield head first. We screeched to a halt, Bill rubbing his head. “What the hell did you do that for?” he moaned. “Just checking to see if your father was right? Guess not.” His head had cracked the glass but didn’t go thru it.

When I told my father the circumstances, h

DEEPNHOCK
05-22-2007, 12:17 PM
You brought back a fond memory that my kids still laugh about at family gatherings..
Back when my kids were munchkins something locked up the motor on our upright vacuum. Being the parsimonious Studebaker guy that I am, I sat on the kitchen floor and took it all apart. Found a paper clip stuck to the permanent magnet on the motor, so the jam was easily fixed. Wanting to do good PM, I washed everything off with WD40. Not wanting to waste further time, I decided to check the motor before reassembly. So, I sat there on the floor with this vacuum across my lap all apart. I asked my oldest to plug in the cord. I didn't really pay attention, but the switch was on, and as soon as she plugged it in the vacuum shot a three foot long jet of fire out of it. The flames didn't hit anyone, but all the eyes in the room were as big as saucers[:0]...
After a few seconds we all cracked up laughing.
Then we ate supper in the kitchen and everything tasted like WD40...
Jeff[8D]


quote:Originally posted by klifton1

<snip>
A canaster vacum cleaner should work. Well it will, untill it ignites the fumes. Wife said it looked like a flying saucer on the end of a hose. She needed a new vacum anyway.


http://i77.photobucket.com/albums/j54/deepnhock/Jeff%20Rice%20Studebaker%20Pictures/1937StudebakerCoupeExpressJeffRicee.jpg

DEEPNHOCK at Gmail.com
Brooklet, Georgia
'37 Coupe Express (never ending project)
'37 Coupe Express Trailer (project)
'61 Hawk (project)
http://community.webshots.com/user/deepnhock

DEEPNHOCK
05-22-2007, 12:17 PM
You brought back a fond memory that my kids still laugh about at family gatherings..
Back when my kids were munchkins something locked up the motor on our upright vacuum. Being the parsimonious Studebaker guy that I am, I sat on the kitchen floor and took it all apart. Found a paper clip stuck to the permanent magnet on the motor, so the jam was easily fixed. Wanting to do good PM, I washed everything off with WD40. Not wanting to waste further time, I decided to check the motor before reassembly. So, I sat there on the floor with this vacuum across my lap all apart. I asked my oldest to plug in the cord. I didn't really pay attention, but the switch was on, and as soon as she plugged it in the vacuum shot a three foot long jet of fire out of it. The flames didn't hit anyone, but all the eyes in the room were as big as saucers[:0]...
After a few seconds we all cracked up laughing.
Then we ate supper in the kitchen and everything tasted like WD40...
Jeff[8D]


quote:Originally posted by klifton1

<snip>
A canaster vacum cleaner should work. Well it will, untill it ignites the fumes. Wife said it looked like a flying saucer on the end of a hose. She needed a new vacum anyway.


http://i77.photobucket.com/albums/j54/deepnhock/Jeff%20Rice%20Studebaker%20Pictures/1937StudebakerCoupeExpressJeffRicee.jpg

DEEPNHOCK at Gmail.com
Brooklet, Georgia
'37 Coupe Express (never ending project)
'37 Coupe Express Trailer (project)
'61 Hawk (project)
http://community.webshots.com/user/deepnhock

DEEPNHOCK
05-22-2007, 12:24 PM
I had a problem with a Holley 650 on the CE like that.
The Holley crossover tube o-ring split and it pumped raw gas all over the top of the engine and it ran underneath the car onto a lit droplight. It didn't break, but it scared the poop out of me. That's one reason why the rubber covered bulbs are sold.
But droplights are strange too.. Someone mentioned to me an electrocution that happened from a flourescent droplight being used in a metal container. The transformer shorted against the surface and the user was DRT... (dead right there)..
You never know...
Jeff[8D]


quote:Originally posted by Skip Lackie

<snip>
The acetone had squirted out of the steel brake line attached to the rear axle and made a direct hit on the trouble light I had hanging there. The bulb had broken and had ignited the acetone. <snip>

http://i77.photobucket.com/albums/j54/deepnhock/Jeff%20Rice%20Studebaker%20Pictures/1937StudebakerCoupeExpressJeffRicee.jpg

DEEPNHOCK at Gmail.com
Brooklet, Georgia
'37 Coupe Express (never ending project)
'37 Coupe Express Trailer (project)
'61 Hawk (project)
http://community.webshots.com/user/deepnhock

DEEPNHOCK
05-22-2007, 12:24 PM
I had a problem with a Holley 650 on the CE like that.
The Holley crossover tube o-ring split and it pumped raw gas all over the top of the engine and it ran underneath the car onto a lit droplight. It didn't break, but it scared the poop out of me. That's one reason why the rubber covered bulbs are sold.
But droplights are strange too.. Someone mentioned to me an electrocution that happened from a flourescent droplight being used in a metal container. The transformer shorted against the surface and the user was DRT... (dead right there)..
You never know...
Jeff[8D]


quote:Originally posted by Skip Lackie

<snip>
The acetone had squirted out of the steel brake line attached to the rear axle and made a direct hit on the trouble light I had hanging there. The bulb had broken and had ignited the acetone. <snip>

http://i77.photobucket.com/albums/j54/deepnhock/Jeff%20Rice%20Studebaker%20Pictures/1937StudebakerCoupeExpressJeffRicee.jpg

DEEPNHOCK at Gmail.com
Brooklet, Georgia
'37 Coupe Express (never ending project)
'37 Coupe Express Trailer (project)
'61 Hawk (project)
http://community.webshots.com/user/deepnhock

62HawkPhil07
05-22-2007, 01:11 PM
In the 70's I purchased a used Volkswagen. This car had a perfect body, great paint, no dents, no rust, but the motor was in sad shape. After a few months of driving I decided to pull and rebuild the engine.
Rebuilding took a few months of working to purchase the parts, pull the engine, then clean, and installed new parts, then re-install the rebuilt engine back in the car.
Well after re-installing the motor and many, many attempts, it would not start. I could tell the battery just didn't have enough juice to spin the motor fast enough for it to start.
So, with growing frustration, I pushed the Volkswagen into the street in front of our house and then back the new station wagon in front of the Volkswagen. I then tied a six foot rope between the two cars.
I went inside and asked the wife to pull me with the new station wagon to get the Volkswagen started. Now remember, I told you that the Volkswagen had a perfect body, no dents.

I told my wife, dear went you hear the Volkswagen start, she could stop and I would disconnect the rope between the two cars and she could drive home, adding that she only need to drive no more than 35 MPH to get the Volkswagon started.

Off we went. I was very impressed that she was driving very safely. With great confidence that she totally understood exactly what I wanted her to do, I then turned on the ignition switch and slowlyyyyyyy let out on the clutch andddddd with great joy and excitement the Volkswagen fired right off. What a wonderful sound...YES,YES I thought..!!........The last thing I remember was my chin clipping the top of the steering wheel as my face smashing against the windshield......Yup, she stopped, she did exactly what I told her. Went my wife heard the motor start, she abruptly stopped. Now I had a Volkswagen with a great motor but it now had a screwed up body. The Head lights pointed to the sky, hood was crushed and windshield was cracked.

62HawkPhil07
05-22-2007, 01:11 PM
In the 70's I purchased a used Volkswagen. This car had a perfect body, great paint, no dents, no rust, but the motor was in sad shape. After a few months of driving I decided to pull and rebuild the engine.
Rebuilding took a few months of working to purchase the parts, pull the engine, then clean, and installed new parts, then re-install the rebuilt engine back in the car.
Well after re-installing the motor and many, many attempts, it would not start. I could tell the battery just didn't have enough juice to spin the motor fast enough for it to start.
So, with growing frustration, I pushed the Volkswagen into the street in front of our house and then back the new station wagon in front of the Volkswagen. I then tied a six foot rope between the two cars.
I went inside and asked the wife to pull me with the new station wagon to get the Volkswagen started. Now remember, I told you that the Volkswagen had a perfect body, no dents.

I told my wife, dear went you hear the Volkswagen start, she could stop and I would disconnect the rope between the two cars and she could drive home, adding that she only need to drive no more than 35 MPH to get the Volkswagon started.

Off we went. I was very impressed that she was driving very safely. With great confidence that she totally understood exactly what I wanted her to do, I then turned on the ignition switch and slowlyyyyyyy let out on the clutch andddddd with great joy and excitement the Volkswagen fired right off. What a wonderful sound...YES,YES I thought..!!........The last thing I remember was my chin clipping the top of the steering wheel as my face smashing against the windshield......Yup, she stopped, she did exactly what I told her. Went my wife heard the motor start, she abruptly stopped. Now I had a Volkswagen with a great motor but it now had a screwed up body. The Head lights pointed to the sky, hood was crushed and windshield was cracked.

Pckstude
05-22-2007, 05:17 PM
After reading all these "bone headed" stories I don't feel so bad about mine. I was using my '64 cruiser as a daily driver. And my wife was using a '59 stude wagon as a daily driver too. One day I ended up going to work by myself as my car pool partner stayed home for a few days.
When I got to work, I decided to cut across the huge parking lot which meant going over one of those cement parking bunkers that u pull up to and stops the car when parked. (can't think of the right word for that) Anyways, by cutting across the parking lot I had go over one of those. I had made a calculated decision that the car sat up high enough to clear the cement bunker. Don't get ahead of the story on me now.
No problem. I cleared it just fine. The problem came in when my car pool partner road with me the next time I did this stunt. Yup, I heard a thump. My heart sank into my stomach. After I pulled into a parking spot I looked back and saw a trail of oil from where I struck that cement bunker. Not wanting to be late for the job, I rushed into the building and to my work station thinking that I would take care of it later. No big deal. With in 5 minutes I got a call in the shop requesting my presence out at my car. When I got there two fire trucks where waiting for me and had already put some oil dry stuff down.
As I was walking back into the building, my timing was just right to hear some lady say, "Some idiot ran over one of them cement things." She didn't know it was me, but she could've had she seen my flushed face from the embarrassment.
I left the car over night and came back the next day trying to figure out what to do. The damage was to that little dip at the oil pan drain plug. The collision didn't destroy that dip, but put a big enough hole in it to leak the oil. I used a temporary putty of some kind to plug the hole. Filled the engine with oil and prayed all the way home.
This little incident had bright side to it. A welder friend of mine welded the hole on the car, and altho he did a good job, it always had just a little bit of drip coming from there. Ok, no big deal. Not to much longer after that my welder friend died suddenly. Now that incident became a memory of him, and that occasional drip a witness to the event.
The car was sold because of a divorce, then bought back 4 yrs later. The new owner had the engine overhauled and of course replaced the oil pan. So I don't have the oil pan as a witness to the memory, but I wish I did.

Pckstude
05-22-2007, 05:17 PM
After reading all these "bone headed" stories I don't feel so bad about mine. I was using my '64 cruiser as a daily driver. And my wife was using a '59 stude wagon as a daily driver too. One day I ended up going to work by myself as my car pool partner stayed home for a few days.
When I got to work, I decided to cut across the huge parking lot which meant going over one of those cement parking bunkers that u pull up to and stops the car when parked. (can't think of the right word for that) Anyways, by cutting across the parking lot I had go over one of those. I had made a calculated decision that the car sat up high enough to clear the cement bunker. Don't get ahead of the story on me now.
No problem. I cleared it just fine. The problem came in when my car pool partner road with me the next time I did this stunt. Yup, I heard a thump. My heart sank into my stomach. After I pulled into a parking spot I looked back and saw a trail of oil from where I struck that cement bunker. Not wanting to be late for the job, I rushed into the building and to my work station thinking that I would take care of it later. No big deal. With in 5 minutes I got a call in the shop requesting my presence out at my car. When I got there two fire trucks where waiting for me and had already put some oil dry stuff down.
As I was walking back into the building, my timing was just right to hear some lady say, "Some idiot ran over one of them cement things." She didn't know it was me, but she could've had she seen my flushed face from the embarrassment.
I left the car over night and came back the next day trying to figure out what to do. The damage was to that little dip at the oil pan drain plug. The collision didn't destroy that dip, but put a big enough hole in it to leak the oil. I used a temporary putty of some kind to plug the hole. Filled the engine with oil and prayed all the way home.
This little incident had bright side to it. A welder friend of mine welded the hole on the car, and altho he did a good job, it always had just a little bit of drip coming from there. Ok, no big deal. Not to much longer after that my welder friend died suddenly. Now that incident became a memory of him, and that occasional drip a witness to the event.
The car was sold because of a divorce, then bought back 4 yrs later. The new owner had the engine overhauled and of course replaced the oil pan. So I don't have the oil pan as a witness to the memory, but I wish I did.

jjones
05-22-2007, 05:48 PM
In the early 1960s when I was in high school I had a 40 Ford 4-door sedan. (I dreamed of a coupe, but my budget said 4-door.) One night a friend of mine and our dates were driving out to a "lovers lane" at Estrella Park, now Phoenix International Raceway. Being a typical 16 year old male (Matthew, don't read this) I was showing off by sliding the car around corners on the dirt road. The more the girls screamed, the faster I went, until my girlfriend flipped the switch, turned the ignition off, and threw the keys out the window. Those of you who have driven these old Fords know that when you flip the switch and turn the ignition off, it locks the steering wheel. This car also had one of those 3-or-4-pumps-and-it-might-stop brake systems. After an interesting ride through the brush and salt ceders, we hit a concrete foundation. Ripped the front axle off, smashed the oil pan into the crank, and put the fan through the radiator, totalling the car. That was the last time that girl went out with me. I can't imagine why, after all, it was her fault.

jjones
05-22-2007, 05:48 PM
In the early 1960s when I was in high school I had a 40 Ford 4-door sedan. (I dreamed of a coupe, but my budget said 4-door.) One night a friend of mine and our dates were driving out to a "lovers lane" at Estrella Park, now Phoenix International Raceway. Being a typical 16 year old male (Matthew, don't read this) I was showing off by sliding the car around corners on the dirt road. The more the girls screamed, the faster I went, until my girlfriend flipped the switch, turned the ignition off, and threw the keys out the window. Those of you who have driven these old Fords know that when you flip the switch and turn the ignition off, it locks the steering wheel. This car also had one of those 3-or-4-pumps-and-it-might-stop brake systems. After an interesting ride through the brush and salt ceders, we hit a concrete foundation. Ripped the front axle off, smashed the oil pan into the crank, and put the fan through the radiator, totalling the car. That was the last time that girl went out with me. I can't imagine why, after all, it was her fault.

studelover
05-22-2007, 06:22 PM
delete

studelover
05-22-2007, 06:22 PM
delete

studelover
05-22-2007, 06:24 PM
I don't feel so bad about what happened to me now as many years have passed, I have a 1978 trans am, I have owned sice graduating high school. I was at a friends house showing off and noticed the Holly Carb was slightly out of tune, spun the little wing nut off the air cleaner and holding the wing nut and reved the motor with the one hand and turning the screw driver with the other the wing nut fell in the carb, the motor continued to run very well. I cut the motor off and tried to find the wing nut, could not find it. I thought it went out the exhaust. I got on the highway and after about 15 miles I heard a rattle then white smoke then a miss, I made it home however two cly had to be sleeved and 3 pistons neeed replaced.I took 6 months to save up for the parts, I still have the car and the wing nut is so big it can't fit in the mouth of the carb, lesson learned![8)]

Studebakers forever!

studelover
05-22-2007, 06:24 PM
I don't feel so bad about what happened to me now as many years have passed, I have a 1978 trans am, I have owned sice graduating high school. I was at a friends house showing off and noticed the Holly Carb was slightly out of tune, spun the little wing nut off the air cleaner and holding the wing nut and reved the motor with the one hand and turning the screw driver with the other the wing nut fell in the carb, the motor continued to run very well. I cut the motor off and tried to find the wing nut, could not find it. I thought it went out the exhaust. I got on the highway and after about 15 miles I heard a rattle then white smoke then a miss, I made it home however two cly had to be sleeved and 3 pistons neeed replaced.I took 6 months to save up for the parts, I still have the car and the wing nut is so big it can't fit in the mouth of the carb, lesson learned![8)]

Studebakers forever!

Roscomacaw
05-22-2007, 07:13 PM
30+ years ago, I was working at Lockheed-Georgia. I was on 3rd shift for many years and I liked it. It was during those years that I started to take an interest in cars. The first "oldie" I ever tried to fix up was a 56 Caddy Coupe de Ville. [^]
Back to Lockheed.... we aircraft repair types always had our own squeeze bottle of "Trico" (trichlorethyelene) solvent we used in the course of our work. Great stuff it is too, although I'm not sure you can get it any more - what with all the cautionary crap we have to deal with - in no small part thanks to dim bulbs that would sniff the stuff for entertainment!
Anyways, these bottles were refillable, semi-clear plastic that wasn't affected by the Trico. They had a plastic tube sticking out of the cap that came up and then bent 90º and narrowed to a small spout. To rinse something clean with the stuff, you'd point and squeeze the bottle. Worked great!
SO, since I was building my FIRST EVER auto engine in the basement of the apartment where I lived, it was only natural to liberate some of this solvent to use in the course of that project.
I filled a squeeze bottle full of Trico and tossed it over the fence near where my car was parked (happened to be a '62 Corvair coupe). Then I went out at "lunch time" - which on 3rd shift was at 3AM. The bottle had rolled under my car and it was easy to retrieve. I set it between the seats and drove the couple blocks home (you could go out on your lunch break if you wanted).
When I got home, I started to exit the car and then thought of something in the back seat that I wanted to take into the apartment with me. Without considering the consequences, I parked the bottle of Trico between my thighs and twisted around in the seat to get the item in the back.[8] The resultant squeeze of the bottle - with the spout aimed JUST RIGHT - caused a nice, solid flow of solvent to squirt onto my crotch area.:(
There was the momentary shock of surprize as my boy parts got cleansed and sterilized. Just as quick tho, the resultant scorching pain that ensued caused a flow of explatives and a dance outside the Corvair that I don't think I could ever do again. Only after I was in the shower with the cold water flowing did I consider how lucky I was that no one was awake at the apartment complex at 3AM. I was naked from the waist down before I ever even got to the porch![:0][8D][V]

Miscreant adrift in
the BerStuda Triangle
http://images.andale.com/f2/115/106/906179/2006/12/7/truckonhill3.jpg

1957 Transtar 1/2ton
1960 Larkvertible V8
1958 Provincial wagon
1953 Commander coupe

Roscomacaw
05-22-2007, 07:13 PM
30+ years ago, I was working at Lockheed-Georgia. I was on 3rd shift for many years and I liked it. It was during those years that I started to take an interest in cars. The first "oldie" I ever tried to fix up was a 56 Caddy Coupe de Ville. [^]
Back to Lockheed.... we aircraft repair types always had our own squeeze bottle of "Trico" (trichlorethyelene) solvent we used in the course of our work. Great stuff it is too, although I'm not sure you can get it any more - what with all the cautionary crap we have to deal with - in no small part thanks to dim bulbs that would sniff the stuff for entertainment!
Anyways, these bottles were refillable, semi-clear plastic that wasn't affected by the Trico. They had a plastic tube sticking out of the cap that came up and then bent 90º and narrowed to a small spout. To rinse something clean with the stuff, you'd point and squeeze the bottle. Worked great!
SO, since I was building my FIRST EVER auto engine in the basement of the apartment where I lived, it was only natural to liberate some of this solvent to use in the course of that project.
I filled a squeeze bottle full of Trico and tossed it over the fence near where my car was parked (happened to be a '62 Corvair coupe). Then I went out at "lunch time" - which on 3rd shift was at 3AM. The bottle had rolled under my car and it was easy to retrieve. I set it between the seats and drove the couple blocks home (you could go out on your lunch break if you wanted).
When I got home, I started to exit the car and then thought of something in the back seat that I wanted to take into the apartment with me. Without considering the consequences, I parked the bottle of Trico between my thighs and twisted around in the seat to get the item in the back.[8] The resultant squeeze of the bottle - with the spout aimed JUST RIGHT - caused a nice, solid flow of solvent to squirt onto my crotch area.:(
There was the momentary shock of surprize as my boy parts got cleansed and sterilized. Just as quick tho, the resultant scorching pain that ensued caused a flow of explatives and a dance outside the Corvair that I don't think I could ever do again. Only after I was in the shower with the cold water flowing did I consider how lucky I was that no one was awake at the apartment complex at 3AM. I was naked from the waist down before I ever even got to the porch![:0][8D][V]

Miscreant adrift in
the BerStuda Triangle
http://images.andale.com/f2/115/106/906179/2006/12/7/truckonhill3.jpg

1957 Transtar 1/2ton
1960 Larkvertible V8
1958 Provincial wagon
1953 Commander coupe

studevic
05-23-2007, 05:17 AM
I have had a laugh reading these but i have done a few bonehead acts myself, the worst was some years ago i bought a 1965 stude sedan in a nearby town, it had no motor or brakes so i hired a car trailer and drove over and the old owner helped me push it onto the trailer,i drove home and up my driveway onto the lawn behind my house, now to get the stude off the trailer, i was by myself so i thought i could push it off and let it run down the ramps and it would stop on the back lawn,i got up on the trailer and got the stude rocking , with a mighty push it started rolling down the ramps, as i stood watching i then realised the stude was now moving at a fast pace and i had no way ready to stop it, the car took off like a rocket accross the back lawn and heading for the back wall of my house, i jumped down and ran after the runway but to late ,with a mighty crash and a cloud of dust the cruiser smashed into the house. I was stunned to see the damage, one wall smashed but the stude was only slightly dented, i learnt a important lesson that day and a costly one. I have done a few others but not as bad as that, regards Roger.

R.A.Jennings

studevic
05-23-2007, 05:17 AM
I have had a laugh reading these but i have done a few bonehead acts myself, the worst was some years ago i bought a 1965 stude sedan in a nearby town, it had no motor or brakes so i hired a car trailer and drove over and the old owner helped me push it onto the trailer,i drove home and up my driveway onto the lawn behind my house, now to get the stude off the trailer, i was by myself so i thought i could push it off and let it run down the ramps and it would stop on the back lawn,i got up on the trailer and got the stude rocking , with a mighty push it started rolling down the ramps, as i stood watching i then realised the stude was now moving at a fast pace and i had no way ready to stop it, the car took off like a rocket accross the back lawn and heading for the back wall of my house, i jumped down and ran after the runway but to late ,with a mighty crash and a cloud of dust the cruiser smashed into the house. I was stunned to see the damage, one wall smashed but the stude was only slightly dented, i learnt a important lesson that day and a costly one. I have done a few others but not as bad as that, regards Roger.

R.A.Jennings

DEEPNHOCK
05-23-2007, 07:17 AM
While not a Stude, it still is Stude funny....
I remember stripping a Falcon ('64 IIRC)down to being a 'roller' so we could flat tow it to the wrecking yard. I took the pumpkin out of the rear end, and jammed a piece of water pipe over the axle ends to keep them sort of lined up. It was only about 6.4 miles from the house to the wrecking yard. I should have used the seven mile pipe instead of the six mile pipe. We got within eyesight of the wrecking yard when both the axles started to slide out. Instantly radiused the wheelwells. Started to scrape the pumpkin botton on the pavement. Wheels and axles were hanging 2 feet out each side of the car and floppin front to back like a fish out of water. Shot sparks all over out the back like a Joey Chitwwod stunt car.
Actually had to mash the gas harder on the tow car to get it the last block or so... Shakin' like crazy...
But we were gonna get it there fer' sure[:0]...
Jeff[8D]



quote:Originally posted by Skip Lackie

Elsewhere on this page JDP describes his biggest bone headed move of the year. His description provokes me to suggest that others have a world-class car-related bone-headed move to report. Rather than hijack his thread, I hereby start a separate thread where we can all describe examples of our own stupidity. Here's my submission.

DEEPNHOCK
05-23-2007, 07:17 AM
While not a Stude, it still is Stude funny....
I remember stripping a Falcon ('64 IIRC)down to being a 'roller' so we could flat tow it to the wrecking yard. I took the pumpkin out of the rear end, and jammed a piece of water pipe over the axle ends to keep them sort of lined up. It was only about 6.4 miles from the house to the wrecking yard. I should have used the seven mile pipe instead of the six mile pipe. We got within eyesight of the wrecking yard when both the axles started to slide out. Instantly radiused the wheelwells. Started to scrape the pumpkin botton on the pavement. Wheels and axles were hanging 2 feet out each side of the car and floppin front to back like a fish out of water. Shot sparks all over out the back like a Joey Chitwwod stunt car.
Actually had to mash the gas harder on the tow car to get it the last block or so... Shakin' like crazy...
But we were gonna get it there fer' sure[:0]...
Jeff[8D]



quote:Originally posted by Skip Lackie

Elsewhere on this page JDP describes his biggest bone headed move of the year. His description provokes me to suggest that others have a world-class car-related bone-headed move to report. Rather than hijack his thread, I hereby start a separate thread where we can all describe examples of our own stupidity. Here's my submission.

bige
05-23-2007, 08:20 AM
I SCORED a Edelbrock AVS carb on ebay for $75.00! It was inaccurately described and had lousy pictures. When I got the box I took it out to the garage, unpacked it and started to see if the linkages was free. It was fine but in the process of testing it the carb rolled out of my hands and bounced off the fender of the Avanti, tore through the cover and put 2 deep gouges in the top of the fender. Carb...$75.00, body work $350.00 paying $425.00 for a used carb, priceless!

ErnieR

http://i146.photobucket.com/albums/r241/AvantiR2/track.jpg

bige
05-23-2007, 08:20 AM
I SCORED a Edelbrock AVS carb on ebay for $75.00! It was inaccurately described and had lousy pictures. When I got the box I took it out to the garage, unpacked it and started to see if the linkages was free. It was fine but in the process of testing it the carb rolled out of my hands and bounced off the fender of the Avanti, tore through the cover and put 2 deep gouges in the top of the fender. Carb...$75.00, body work $350.00 paying $425.00 for a used carb, priceless!

ErnieR

http://i146.photobucket.com/albums/r241/AvantiR2/track.jpg

DEEPNHOCK
05-23-2007, 10:43 AM
Pictures?
Band-Aides?
Jeff[8D]


quote:Originally posted by bige

I SCORED a Edelbrock AVS carb on ebay for $75.00! It was inaccurately described and had lousy pictures. When I got the box I took it out to the garage, unpacked it and started to see if the linkages was free. It was fine but in the process of testing it the carb rolled out of my hands and bounced off the fender of the Avanti, tore through the cover and put 2 deep gouges in the top of the fender. Carb...$75.00, body work $350.00 paying $425.00 for a used carb, priceless!
ErnieR

DEEPNHOCK
05-23-2007, 10:43 AM
Pictures?
Band-Aides?
Jeff[8D]


quote:Originally posted by bige

I SCORED a Edelbrock AVS carb on ebay for $75.00! It was inaccurately described and had lousy pictures. When I got the box I took it out to the garage, unpacked it and started to see if the linkages was free. It was fine but in the process of testing it the carb rolled out of my hands and bounced off the fender of the Avanti, tore through the cover and put 2 deep gouges in the top of the fender. Carb...$75.00, body work $350.00 paying $425.00 for a used carb, priceless!
ErnieR

bige
05-23-2007, 11:12 AM
I was so aggravated that I took it right to the body shop and had it fixed. It was like a big Turquoise sign that said "You're an Idiot"!

ErnieR

http://i146.photobucket.com/albums/r241/AvantiR2/track.jpg

bige
05-23-2007, 11:12 AM
I was so aggravated that I took it right to the body shop and had it fixed. It was like a big Turquoise sign that said "You're an Idiot"!

ErnieR

http://i146.photobucket.com/albums/r241/AvantiR2/track.jpg

stude freak
05-23-2007, 01:14 PM
Hey gang. Good to be back on the forum .Probably wssn't missed but as i read this I'm feeling better just reading these hiliarous but heart rendering tragedies I'm reminded of one of the first of many i've had .My first car i payed for with my own money was a 60 chevy.I was 3 months out of high school and my buddy and i was going to my girlfriends 18th birthday party. He had snuck a 6 pack of Schlitz from his dads cache. I had just installed some dual cherry bombs on my chevy and the 283 was sounding sweet.About 5 miles down the road (rough gravel roads)we began to smell something awful,we stop look at motor nothing there to cause any worry so we get back in and start up again ,acouple more miles and it gets worse i check my rearview mirror and smoke is coming from back seat floor board. I pull over and the rear carpet is on fire smoldering .Ther only recourse is to use the beer to put out the fire.It seems a leak in the muffler to tail pipe connection has heated the floor board red hot . We made it to the party , but the smell never left the chevy even after new carpets and countless interior cleanings.

David Baggett '53 coupe

stude freak
05-23-2007, 01:14 PM
Hey gang. Good to be back on the forum .Probably wssn't missed but as i read this I'm feeling better just reading these hiliarous but heart rendering tragedies I'm reminded of one of the first of many i've had .My first car i payed for with my own money was a 60 chevy.I was 3 months out of high school and my buddy and i was going to my girlfriends 18th birthday party. He had snuck a 6 pack of Schlitz from his dads cache. I had just installed some dual cherry bombs on my chevy and the 283 was sounding sweet.About 5 miles down the road (rough gravel roads)we began to smell something awful,we stop look at motor nothing there to cause any worry so we get back in and start up again ,acouple more miles and it gets worse i check my rearview mirror and smoke is coming from back seat floor board. I pull over and the rear carpet is on fire smoldering .Ther only recourse is to use the beer to put out the fire.It seems a leak in the muffler to tail pipe connection has heated the floor board red hot . We made it to the party , but the smell never left the chevy even after new carpets and countless interior cleanings.

David Baggett '53 coupe

Blue 15G
05-23-2007, 01:31 PM
Years ago I had a '60 Lark V-8 that I decided to have rebuilt at my local automotive machine shop. When the shop man bolted down the main bearing caps on reassembly, he hadn't kept track of their original location and cracked one. Rather than look for new caps, he just brazed the cap back together. Said that this kind of repair was done all the time on diesel trucks, etc. Not knowing any better, I said, "Sure, why not?".

When the engine was back in the car, it ran fine at first. Then my oil pressure soon dropped a lot. I soon discovered that the mechanic didn't grind off enough of the braze from the side of the cap before reassembly and the brazed section was being scraped by the throws of the crank (or rods? I can't recall exactly) with every revolution. The oil I drained out was the prettiest metallic gold color I ever saw.

Yeah, we found a used block, got the caps off it, did a line bore, etc. the second time around. There is a lot more to the story, but I still don't even like thinking about what aggravation I went through to get my car back on the road. [V]

Blue 15G
05-23-2007, 01:31 PM
Years ago I had a '60 Lark V-8 that I decided to have rebuilt at my local automotive machine shop. When the shop man bolted down the main bearing caps on reassembly, he hadn't kept track of their original location and cracked one. Rather than look for new caps, he just brazed the cap back together. Said that this kind of repair was done all the time on diesel trucks, etc. Not knowing any better, I said, "Sure, why not?".

When the engine was back in the car, it ran fine at first. Then my oil pressure soon dropped a lot. I soon discovered that the mechanic didn't grind off enough of the braze from the side of the cap before reassembly and the brazed section was being scraped by the throws of the crank (or rods? I can't recall exactly) with every revolution. The oil I drained out was the prettiest metallic gold color I ever saw.

Yeah, we found a used block, got the caps off it, did a line bore, etc. the second time around. There is a lot more to the story, but I still don't even like thinking about what aggravation I went through to get my car back on the road. [V]

JDP
05-23-2007, 03:01 PM
OK, a few more related moves. Once I was painting some parts in the yard and tossed a pocket knife into the ground, hitting the spray can directly and covering me with gray primer. Another time I tossed a screwdriver over my shoulder and into the radiator of a 48 Champ with a open hood. I won't even talk about the perfect Avanti dash I tossed onto the top shelf and right into a nail sticking out of the wall.

JDP/Maryland


63 GT R2
63 Avanti R1
63 Daytona convert
63 Lark 2 door
62 Lark 2 door
60 Lark HT-60Hawk
59 3E truck
58 Starlight
52 & 53 Starliner
51 Commander

JDP
05-23-2007, 03:01 PM
OK, a few more related moves. Once I was painting some parts in the yard and tossed a pocket knife into the ground, hitting the spray can directly and covering me with gray primer. Another time I tossed a screwdriver over my shoulder and into the radiator of a 48 Champ with a open hood. I won't even talk about the perfect Avanti dash I tossed onto the top shelf and right into a nail sticking out of the wall.

JDP/Maryland


63 GT R2
63 Avanti R1
63 Daytona convert
63 Lark 2 door
62 Lark 2 door
60 Lark HT-60Hawk
59 3E truck
58 Starlight
52 & 53 Starliner
51 Commander

Guido
05-23-2007, 04:30 PM
A couple more...

I had to take my rollback truck in for a new clutch. Since the IH dealer was 40 miles from my house, I decided to load my Toyota pickup on the back for the return trip. I winched the truck up and then laid the bed back down. The problem? The truck was facing downhill and I had not chained down the rear end. It rolled straight into the headboard of the bed and dented the grille on the Toyota but fortunately did not hurt the light bar on the rollback.

Another time I moved an IH Scout for a friend of mine on a trailer. It was non op and I winched it up with a come along. I took it 60 miles to another friend's house (blowing a trailer tire and covering a car following closely behind with rubber shards) so we could work on it in his shop. I parked next to his shop and unchained the Scout and got involved with something else. My friend came out and jumped in the truck and took off up the hill. While the Scout was in gear the transfer case was in neutral and off the trailer it rolled. Only the unmowed hay saved it from going through a grain bin. It also proved the value of skid plates after the rear wheels dropped off.

http://thumb14.webshots.net/t/53/453/1/21/36/2964121360097493054pVJTFL_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/57/757/2/88/4/2023288040097493054SEKowB_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/18/19/8/37/21/2050837210097493054IYBJJL_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/59/559/1/43/57/2876143570097493054jKVhDw_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/22/22/0/2/68/2589002680097493054ftBuBw_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/28/28/8/30/30/2075830300097493054aSSlFv_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/59/459/2/23/86/2067223860097493054YoeGMx_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/28/28/5/18/33/2537518330097493054OgEKcN_th.jpg
Guido Salvage - "Where rust is beautiful"

Studebaker horse drawn doctor’s buggy; Studebaker horse drawn “Izzer” buggy; 1946 M-16 fire truck; 1948 M-16 grain truck; 1949 2R17A fire truck; 1950 2R5 pickup; 1952 2R17A grain truck; 1952 Packard 200 4 door; 1955 E-38 grain truck; 1957 3E-40 flatbed; 1961 6E-28 grain truck; 1962 7E-13D 4x4 rack truck; 1962 7E-7 Champ pickup; 1962 GT Hawk 4 speed; 1963 8E-28 flatbed; 1964 Avanti R2 4 speed; 1964 Cruiser and various other "treasures" (including a 1959 IH B-120 4 wheel drive).

Hiding and preserving Studebakers in Richmond, Goochland & Louisa, Va.

Guido
05-23-2007, 04:30 PM
A couple more...

I had to take my rollback truck in for a new clutch. Since the IH dealer was 40 miles from my house, I decided to load my Toyota pickup on the back for the return trip. I winched the truck up and then laid the bed back down. The problem? The truck was facing downhill and I had not chained down the rear end. It rolled straight into the headboard of the bed and dented the grille on the Toyota but fortunately did not hurt the light bar on the rollback.

Another time I moved an IH Scout for a friend of mine on a trailer. It was non op and I winched it up with a come along. I took it 60 miles to another friend's house (blowing a trailer tire and covering a car following closely behind with rubber shards) so we could work on it in his shop. I parked next to his shop and unchained the Scout and got involved with something else. My friend came out and jumped in the truck and took off up the hill. While the Scout was in gear the transfer case was in neutral and off the trailer it rolled. Only the unmowed hay saved it from going through a grain bin. It also proved the value of skid plates after the rear wheels dropped off.

http://thumb14.webshots.net/t/53/453/1/21/36/2964121360097493054pVJTFL_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/57/757/2/88/4/2023288040097493054SEKowB_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/18/19/8/37/21/2050837210097493054IYBJJL_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/59/559/1/43/57/2876143570097493054jKVhDw_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/22/22/0/2/68/2589002680097493054ftBuBw_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/28/28/8/30/30/2075830300097493054aSSlFv_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/59/459/2/23/86/2067223860097493054YoeGMx_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/28/28/5/18/33/2537518330097493054OgEKcN_th.jpg
Guido Salvage - "Where rust is beautiful"

Studebaker horse drawn doctor’s buggy; Studebaker horse drawn “Izzer” buggy; 1946 M-16 fire truck; 1948 M-16 grain truck; 1949 2R17A fire truck; 1950 2R5 pickup; 1952 2R17A grain truck; 1952 Packard 200 4 door; 1955 E-38 grain truck; 1957 3E-40 flatbed; 1961 6E-28 grain truck; 1962 7E-13D 4x4 rack truck; 1962 7E-7 Champ pickup; 1962 GT Hawk 4 speed; 1963 8E-28 flatbed; 1964 Avanti R2 4 speed; 1964 Cruiser and various other "treasures" (including a 1959 IH B-120 4 wheel drive).

Hiding and preserving Studebakers in Richmond, Goochland & Louisa, Va.

bob40
05-23-2007, 04:49 PM
3 smooth moves I've made.
1)Was parting out a car that had no ignition switch,had to be hotwired.Front door open with me kneeling on the ground upper torso between front seat and dash.Accidentally touched the 2 wires together and the car started(4-speed in gear)and began dragging me towards a group of trees.Burned hands pulling wires apart.
2)Backing car into a space behind my garage and wanting it as close to the building as possible I managed to shove the rear bumper through the wall.Dont drink and back up.
3)Sold a car to a guy and the day I was to deliver it I took it out for one last run.Driving down a unfamiliar gravel road I broadslided through the corner and was going to fast.Flattened the entire passenger side hitting fenceposts.Guy still bought the car although the price was heavily discounted.
Best Smooth move ever...Told a buddy of mine his snowmobile would look really sharp on a poker run/trail ride if he armour-all'd his seat.Think he bounced/skipped/slid 40 feet.We were 16 at the time and I think he has forgiven me.<G>

bob40
05-23-2007, 04:49 PM
3 smooth moves I've made.
1)Was parting out a car that had no ignition switch,had to be hotwired.Front door open with me kneeling on the ground upper torso between front seat and dash.Accidentally touched the 2 wires together and the car started(4-speed in gear)and began dragging me towards a group of trees.Burned hands pulling wires apart.
2)Backing car into a space behind my garage and wanting it as close to the building as possible I managed to shove the rear bumper through the wall.Dont drink and back up.
3)Sold a car to a guy and the day I was to deliver it I took it out for one last run.Driving down a unfamiliar gravel road I broadslided through the corner and was going to fast.Flattened the entire passenger side hitting fenceposts.Guy still bought the car although the price was heavily discounted.
Best Smooth move ever...Told a buddy of mine his snowmobile would look really sharp on a poker run/trail ride if he armour-all'd his seat.Think he bounced/skipped/slid 40 feet.We were 16 at the time and I think he has forgiven me.<G>

jnormanh
05-23-2007, 04:52 PM
Ahhh, a subject I know something about.

1. Installing a radio in a car which never had one, decided I needed to drill a hole through the firewall (not a Stude). Drilled the hole, backed the drill out...WATER?...where the **** did that come from...there's no water on the other side of....oh **** - BATTERY ACID!! New battery, new trim panels, and two days scraping up the gooey mess that was nylon carlet.

2. Working on my daughter's 455 CI Olds. Carb problem, sticky butterflies. Need to bend the shaft. Large screwdriver in the carb throat, break off a piece of the carb, falls down into intake manifold, sucked into engine. I can hear it banging around inside a cylinder. What to do now? Hmmmm.

Full throttle, and danged if it doesn't spit the broken part out into the muffler. BANG.

jnormanh
05-23-2007, 04:52 PM
Ahhh, a subject I know something about.

1. Installing a radio in a car which never had one, decided I needed to drill a hole through the firewall (not a Stude). Drilled the hole, backed the drill out...WATER?...where the **** did that come from...there's no water on the other side of....oh **** - BATTERY ACID!! New battery, new trim panels, and two days scraping up the gooey mess that was nylon carlet.

2. Working on my daughter's 455 CI Olds. Carb problem, sticky butterflies. Need to bend the shaft. Large screwdriver in the carb throat, break off a piece of the carb, falls down into intake manifold, sucked into engine. I can hear it banging around inside a cylinder. What to do now? Hmmmm.

Full throttle, and danged if it doesn't spit the broken part out into the muffler. BANG.

studelover
05-23-2007, 05:19 PM
Real smart, in the late 60's father had a 1960 T-bird I used to watch him and his brothers do this thing with their cars, stand outside the car turn the ignition on take car out of gear, rolls a few feet jump in and go....Anything they can do I can do better I can do anything better then you... Turned the key car starts but rolls backward (jumps into reverse)down the gravel road it goes. I never knew my dad could run that fast or hit that hard.....stood two nights in a row at dinner mom never knew why and dad did not tell her.[:p]gosh I miss my pop

Studebakers forever!

studelover
05-23-2007, 05:19 PM
Real smart, in the late 60's father had a 1960 T-bird I used to watch him and his brothers do this thing with their cars, stand outside the car turn the ignition on take car out of gear, rolls a few feet jump in and go....Anything they can do I can do better I can do anything better then you... Turned the key car starts but rolls backward (jumps into reverse)down the gravel road it goes. I never knew my dad could run that fast or hit that hard.....stood two nights in a row at dinner mom never knew why and dad did not tell her.[:p]gosh I miss my pop

Studebakers forever!

8E45E
05-23-2007, 05:20 PM
Boneheaded Move #1: Parting out that '61 Cruiser I had back in '79.
I really should have kept it.:(

Boneheaded Move #2: When I was Matt's age, I owned a '65 Commander;
used as much oil as a worn out Vega. In the
winter, I would keep the oil in the house so it
would be easier to pour. I'd even open it
in the house by punching the can with a screw-
driver and ream it out to make the hole bigger,
usually on the dining room rug as it was
closest to the front door. One time, I
accidently pierced the side of the can while
reaming out the hole in the top, allowing fresh
oil to run onto the rug, which had the rubber
backing. My mom did notice the stain some-
time later on the rug, and using her logic,
thought someone spilled some margerine
or other greasy food substance. At first, I
didn't say anything when she got out the Ajax
scrubbed it clean, until a week later when there
was a permanent wrinkle in that spot where the
motor oil had dissolved away the foam rubber
backing. She wondered what the hell could have
eaten away the rubber backing like that. My
'boneheaded' move? Telling her what really
caused it.[:0]

Craig.

8E45E
05-23-2007, 05:20 PM
Boneheaded Move #1: Parting out that '61 Cruiser I had back in '79.
I really should have kept it.:(

Boneheaded Move #2: When I was Matt's age, I owned a '65 Commander;
used as much oil as a worn out Vega. In the
winter, I would keep the oil in the house so it
would be easier to pour. I'd even open it
in the house by punching the can with a screw-
driver and ream it out to make the hole bigger,
usually on the dining room rug as it was
closest to the front door. One time, I
accidently pierced the side of the can while
reaming out the hole in the top, allowing fresh
oil to run onto the rug, which had the rubber
backing. My mom did notice the stain some-
time later on the rug, and using her logic,
thought someone spilled some margerine
or other greasy food substance. At first, I
didn't say anything when she got out the Ajax
scrubbed it clean, until a week later when there
was a permanent wrinkle in that spot where the
motor oil had dissolved away the foam rubber
backing. She wondered what the hell could have
eaten away the rubber backing like that. My
'boneheaded' move? Telling her what really
caused it.[:0]

Craig.

showbizkid
05-23-2007, 08:07 PM
Studelover, your story reminds me of when I used to work for Lucky grocery stores. We had this one showoff stock clerk with a '68 Mustang with a Cleveland/auto combo in it. He liked to do this thing after hours where he'd start it up next to the loading dock, rev it in neutral, smoke the tires forward a few hundred feet, then pop it into reverse and smoke the tires backward a few hundred feet. We'd all stand around and watch him, wondering how our boss ever hired someone so stupid.

One day he starts doing it, and on the second reverse pass, BANG!! the front yoke of the driveshaft lets go and the shaft exits through the drive tunnel and console. We laughed like hell, of course - he finally got the inevitable.


[img=left]http://members.cox.net/clarknovak/lark.gif[/img=left]

Clark in San Diego
'63 F2/Lark Standard
http://studeblogger.blogspot.com

showbizkid
05-23-2007, 08:07 PM
Studelover, your story reminds me of when I used to work for Lucky grocery stores. We had this one showoff stock clerk with a '68 Mustang with a Cleveland/auto combo in it. He liked to do this thing after hours where he'd start it up next to the loading dock, rev it in neutral, smoke the tires forward a few hundred feet, then pop it into reverse and smoke the tires backward a few hundred feet. We'd all stand around and watch him, wondering how our boss ever hired someone so stupid.

One day he starts doing it, and on the second reverse pass, BANG!! the front yoke of the driveshaft lets go and the shaft exits through the drive tunnel and console. We laughed like hell, of course - he finally got the inevitable.


[img=left]http://members.cox.net/clarknovak/lark.gif[/img=left]

Clark in San Diego
'63 F2/Lark Standard
http://studeblogger.blogspot.com

studebakerjeff
05-23-2007, 09:10 PM
Here is something my Son Did. One day I was working on my car ,he came by and wanted to change oil.He had a Le car with front wheel drive. He jack up the car and while he was changing the oil he came to me and said Dad the oil smells funny. I didn't look at it and I told him it was the type of oil, he had just bought the car. Well he finish up and left.About a hour later I got a call from him. He was on the interstate,he told me the car was making a hi pitch noise. I told him to bring the car back and I would look at it. What he did was drain the transmison and put 4 qts of oil in the engine. So the car had 8 qts of oil and no trans. fluid. We drained the oil ,put 4 qts back in and filled the trans. No problem.To this day he stills blames me. Maybe I should have look at it.


Jeff

1950 Champion business coupe
Home of Marshall

studebakerjeff
05-23-2007, 09:10 PM
Here is something my Son Did. One day I was working on my car ,he came by and wanted to change oil.He had a Le car with front wheel drive. He jack up the car and while he was changing the oil he came to me and said Dad the oil smells funny. I didn't look at it and I told him it was the type of oil, he had just bought the car. Well he finish up and left.About a hour later I got a call from him. He was on the interstate,he told me the car was making a hi pitch noise. I told him to bring the car back and I would look at it. What he did was drain the transmison and put 4 qts of oil in the engine. So the car had 8 qts of oil and no trans. fluid. We drained the oil ,put 4 qts back in and filled the trans. No problem.To this day he stills blames me. Maybe I should have look at it.


Jeff

1950 Champion business coupe
Home of Marshall

Guido
05-23-2007, 09:15 PM
quote:Originally posted by studebakerjeff What he did was drain the transmison and put 4 qts of oil in the engine.
I did the exact same thing with an Allis Chalmers HD6 dozer I once owned. [B)]

http://thumb14.webshots.net/t/53/453/1/21/36/2964121360097493054pVJTFL_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/57/757/2/88/4/2023288040097493054SEKowB_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/18/19/8/37/21/2050837210097493054IYBJJL_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/59/559/1/43/57/2876143570097493054jKVhDw_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/22/22/0/2/68/2589002680097493054ftBuBw_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/28/28/8/30/30/2075830300097493054aSSlFv_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/59/459/2/23/86/2067223860097493054YoeGMx_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/28/28/5/18/33/2537518330097493054OgEKcN_th.jpg
[b]Guido Salvage - "Where rust is beautiful"

Studebaker horse drawn doctor’s buggy; Studebaker horse drawn “Izzer” buggy; 1946 M-16 fire truck; 1948 M-16 grain truck; 1949 2R17A fire truck; 1950 2R5 pickup; 1952 2R17A grain truck; 1952 Packard 200 4 door; 1955 E-38 grain truck; 1957 3E-40 flatbed; 1961 6E-28 grain truck; 1962 7E-13D 4x4 rack truck; 1962 7E-7 Champ pickup; 1962 GT Hawk 4 speed; 1963 8E-28 flatbed; 1964 Avanti R2 4 speed; 1964 Cruiser and various other "treasures" (including a 1959 IH B-120 4 wheel drive).

Hiding and preserving Studebakers in Richmond, Goochland & Louisa, Va.

Guido
05-23-2007, 09:15 PM
quote:Originally posted by studebakerjeff What he did was drain the transmison and put 4 qts of oil in the engine.
I did the exact same thing with an Allis Chalmers HD6 dozer I once owned. [B)]

http://thumb14.webshots.net/t/53/453/1/21/36/2964121360097493054pVJTFL_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/57/757/2/88/4/2023288040097493054SEKowB_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/18/19/8/37/21/2050837210097493054IYBJJL_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/59/559/1/43/57/2876143570097493054jKVhDw_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/22/22/0/2/68/2589002680097493054ftBuBw_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/28/28/8/30/30/2075830300097493054aSSlFv_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/59/459/2/23/86/2067223860097493054YoeGMx_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/28/28/5/18/33/2537518330097493054OgEKcN_th.jpg
[b]Guido Salvage - "Where rust is beautiful"

Studebaker horse drawn doctor’s buggy; Studebaker horse drawn “Izzer” buggy; 1946 M-16 fire truck; 1948 M-16 grain truck; 1949 2R17A fire truck; 1950 2R5 pickup; 1952 2R17A grain truck; 1952 Packard 200 4 door; 1955 E-38 grain truck; 1957 3E-40 flatbed; 1961 6E-28 grain truck; 1962 7E-13D 4x4 rack truck; 1962 7E-7 Champ pickup; 1962 GT Hawk 4 speed; 1963 8E-28 flatbed; 1964 Avanti R2 4 speed; 1964 Cruiser and various other "treasures" (including a 1959 IH B-120 4 wheel drive).

Hiding and preserving Studebakers in Richmond, Goochland & Louisa, Va.

gaboy
05-24-2007, 01:42 PM
Been sitting here "laughing away" at your "event" musy have been mighty cold without them coveralls!

Anybody looking?

gaboy
05-24-2007, 01:42 PM
Been sitting here "laughing away" at your "event" musy have been mighty cold without them coveralls!

Anybody looking?

starlightchamp
05-24-2007, 05:19 PM
I can't take credit for this. Story and pic from Dave Carter from who I bought
Miss Blue. Seems Dave dropped one of the screws while putting on the 50 Champion
hood ornament and it dissapeared around the engine, Dave couldn't find it so got another
and finished the job. Sometime later he removed the sparkplugs not knowing or seeing the screw had hidden in the plug recess. Later, while driving, the engine made stange noises
as the errant screw bopped around in the cylinder, fianlly bending the exhaust valve.
Th screw head managed to leave some signatures in the piston top-see below.
Moral of story." You could be screw*d by a missing connector."

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/230/512682747_a1242f6372.jpg

starlightchamp
05-24-2007, 05:19 PM
I can't take credit for this. Story and pic from Dave Carter from who I bought
Miss Blue. Seems Dave dropped one of the screws while putting on the 50 Champion
hood ornament and it dissapeared around the engine, Dave couldn't find it so got another
and finished the job. Sometime later he removed the sparkplugs not knowing or seeing the screw had hidden in the plug recess. Later, while driving, the engine made stange noises
as the errant screw bopped around in the cylinder, fianlly bending the exhaust valve.
Th screw head managed to leave some signatures in the piston top-see below.
Moral of story." You could be screw*d by a missing connector."

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/230/512682747_a1242f6372.jpg

showbizkid
05-24-2007, 06:05 PM
[:0][:0][:0][8]


[img=left]http://members.cox.net/clarknovak/lark.gif[/img=left]

Clark in San Diego
'63 F2/Lark Standard
http://studeblogger.blogspot.com

showbizkid
05-24-2007, 06:05 PM
[:0][:0][:0][8]


[img=left]http://members.cox.net/clarknovak/lark.gif[/img=left]

Clark in San Diego
'63 F2/Lark Standard
http://studeblogger.blogspot.com

RONL
05-26-2007, 08:34 AM
AFTER INSTALLING A TRANS IN MY CAR { ON A NICE INCLINE } I KICKED THE CHOCKS OUT B-4 LETTING DOWN THE JACK , THE FUN PART WAS HOW FAST IT PICKED UP SPEED B-4 SMASHING INTO MY WIFE'S ISUZU WHICH THE BUYER WAS ON THE WAY TO P/U , HE BOUGHT IT ANYWAY LUCKY FOR ME. I'M NORMALLY SAFER THAN THAT BUT YOU KNOW HOW IT IS -A SALE AT THE LAST MINUTE.

RONL
05-26-2007, 08:34 AM
AFTER INSTALLING A TRANS IN MY CAR { ON A NICE INCLINE } I KICKED THE CHOCKS OUT B-4 LETTING DOWN THE JACK , THE FUN PART WAS HOW FAST IT PICKED UP SPEED B-4 SMASHING INTO MY WIFE'S ISUZU WHICH THE BUYER WAS ON THE WAY TO P/U , HE BOUGHT IT ANYWAY LUCKY FOR ME. I'M NORMALLY SAFER THAN THAT BUT YOU KNOW HOW IT IS -A SALE AT THE LAST MINUTE.

studebakerjeff
05-26-2007, 10:35 PM
In the 60's I own a 1963 saab. It had a 2 cycle engine and you had to pre-mix the oil before you put it in the gas tank. I was in a gas station one day and saw a qt. for two cycle engines that you did not need to pre-mix. So I bought it and just put in my gas tank and filled it up. I was in sales, so I was always on the road. I took off to have a meeting and was going down the highway and was passing a truck when the 3 cyl. made a high pitch noise and lock up. I had it pulled home.I took the engine out and down to the basement. You could carry the engine. I took it apart and it was welded . I contacted the oil company and they said that Saab said it was ok to use it and they were sorry it did work.Sorry it didn't work! So don't believe everything you read,Just ask first.


Jeff

1950 Champion business coupe
Home of Marshall

studebakerjeff
05-26-2007, 10:35 PM
In the 60's I own a 1963 saab. It had a 2 cycle engine and you had to pre-mix the oil before you put it in the gas tank. I was in a gas station one day and saw a qt. for two cycle engines that you did not need to pre-mix. So I bought it and just put in my gas tank and filled it up. I was in sales, so I was always on the road. I took off to have a meeting and was going down the highway and was passing a truck when the 3 cyl. made a high pitch noise and lock up. I had it pulled home.I took the engine out and down to the basement. You could carry the engine. I took it apart and it was welded . I contacted the oil company and they said that Saab said it was ok to use it and they were sorry it did work.Sorry it didn't work! So don't believe everything you read,Just ask first.


Jeff

1950 Champion business coupe
Home of Marshall

dictator27
05-28-2007, 11:24 AM
I have fond[?] memories of Christmas Eve 1970. I had installed valve stem seals in a 1966 Falcon with the 200 ci 6 at the Ford dealer where I was apprenticing at the time. They don't have any way to adjust the valves, you just tie down the rocker arm shaft and let the engine bounce around until the lifters bleed down. It bounced around enough that the trans lever jumped out of park into reverse and the car took off across the shop, hitting the back of a new Mustang, nicely kinking both rear fenders of the Mustang. The jolt of hitting the Mustang dropped the car out of reverse into drive and it went back across the shop - shifting into 2nd as it went - and hit my bench at about 20 mph[xx(][B)][:o)]. The entire front clip was pushed back about an inch. When I had started the car I hadn't made sure that the choke would not come on. Oops! Fortunately it was from our used up car lot, not a customer car:D. I had a strip a mile wide torn off me by both the service manager and general manager of the dealership, though.

Terry Godkin

dictator27
05-28-2007, 11:24 AM
I have fond[?] memories of Christmas Eve 1970. I had installed valve stem seals in a 1966 Falcon with the 200 ci 6 at the Ford dealer where I was apprenticing at the time. They don't have any way to adjust the valves, you just tie down the rocker arm shaft and let the engine bounce around until the lifters bleed down. It bounced around enough that the trans lever jumped out of park into reverse and the car took off across the shop, hitting the back of a new Mustang, nicely kinking both rear fenders of the Mustang. The jolt of hitting the Mustang dropped the car out of reverse into drive and it went back across the shop - shifting into 2nd as it went - and hit my bench at about 20 mph[xx(][B)][:o)]. The entire front clip was pushed back about an inch. When I had started the car I hadn't made sure that the choke would not come on. Oops! Fortunately it was from our used up car lot, not a customer car:D. I had a strip a mile wide torn off me by both the service manager and general manager of the dealership, though.

Terry Godkin

Dick Clemens
05-28-2007, 12:18 PM
When I was Selling at Larry Wright Studebaker in Monrovia,CA we used to go to the factory in Vernon to pick up new cars. I went with the GM and two other drivers this one day in his President hardtop to p/u some cars. He parked in a no parking spot and went inside. I saw a parking space open up close to the buildind and got into the drivers seat and started to back outof the straight in parking spot. WHAMO right rear quarter panel ruined. Didn't see car comeing. Sure did feel it though. Had to sell several Presidents to pay for that mistake.

Dick Clemens
05-28-2007, 12:18 PM
When I was Selling at Larry Wright Studebaker in Monrovia,CA we used to go to the factory in Vernon to pick up new cars. I went with the GM and two other drivers this one day in his President hardtop to p/u some cars. He parked in a no parking spot and went inside. I saw a parking space open up close to the buildind and got into the drivers seat and started to back outof the straight in parking spot. WHAMO right rear quarter panel ruined. Didn't see car comeing. Sure did feel it though. Had to sell several Presidents to pay for that mistake.

Guido
05-28-2007, 03:14 PM
quote:Originally posted by dictator27
I had installed valve stem seals in a 1966 Falcon with the 200 ci 6 at the Ford dealer where I was apprenticing at the time.
That brings back memories. In the early '80's I had purchased a '76 F150 4x4 that had sucked water into the intake and been partially disassembled by the PO. I tore the entire motor down and was putting the pistons back in. I bumped the starter to rotate the crank (heads were off) and it barely moved. Turns out I had reversed a couple of the rods. Later on I pulled all the valves and clened them up and put in new seals. I put the second head on the motor and later walked around to the bed where I had done my work to find the valve seals still there. [B)][B)]:(. Had to pull the head and redo the process. [xx(]

http://thumb14.webshots.net/t/53/453/1/21/36/2964121360097493054pVJTFL_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/57/757/2/88/4/2023288040097493054SEKowB_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/18/19/8/37/21/2050837210097493054IYBJJL_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/59/559/1/43/57/2876143570097493054jKVhDw_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/22/22/0/2/68/2589002680097493054ftBuBw_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/28/28/8/30/30/2075830300097493054aSSlFv_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/59/459/2/23/86/2067223860097493054YoeGMx_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/28/28/5/18/33/2537518330097493054OgEKcN_th.jpg
[b]Guido Salvage - "Where rust is beautiful"

Studebaker horse drawn doctor’s buggy; Studebaker horse drawn “Izzer” buggy; 1946 M-16 fire truck; 1948 M-16 grain truck; 1949 2R17A fire truck; 1950 2R5 pickup; 1952 2R17A grain truck; 1952 Packard 200 4 door; 1955 E-38 grain truck; 1957 3E-40 flatbed; 1961 6E-28 grain truck; 1962 7E-13D 4x4 rack truck; 1962 7E-7 Champ pickup; 1962 GT Hawk 4 speed; 1963 8E-28 flatbed; 1964 Avanti R2 4 speed; 1964 Cruiser and various other "treasures" (including a 1959 IH B-120 4 wheel drive).

Hiding and preserving Studebakers in Richmond, Goochland & Louisa, Va.

Guido
05-28-2007, 03:14 PM
quote:Originally posted by dictator27
I had installed valve stem seals in a 1966 Falcon with the 200 ci 6 at the Ford dealer where I was apprenticing at the time.
That brings back memories. In the early '80's I had purchased a '76 F150 4x4 that had sucked water into the intake and been partially disassembled by the PO. I tore the entire motor down and was putting the pistons back in. I bumped the starter to rotate the crank (heads were off) and it barely moved. Turns out I had reversed a couple of the rods. Later on I pulled all the valves and clened them up and put in new seals. I put the second head on the motor and later walked around to the bed where I had done my work to find the valve seals still there. [B)][B)]:(. Had to pull the head and redo the process. [xx(]

http://thumb14.webshots.net/t/53/453/1/21/36/2964121360097493054pVJTFL_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/57/757/2/88/4/2023288040097493054SEKowB_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/18/19/8/37/21/2050837210097493054IYBJJL_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/59/559/1/43/57/2876143570097493054jKVhDw_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/22/22/0/2/68/2589002680097493054ftBuBw_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/28/28/8/30/30/2075830300097493054aSSlFv_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/59/459/2/23/86/2067223860097493054YoeGMx_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/28/28/5/18/33/2537518330097493054OgEKcN_th.jpg
[b]Guido Salvage - "Where rust is beautiful"

Studebaker horse drawn doctor’s buggy; Studebaker horse drawn “Izzer” buggy; 1946 M-16 fire truck; 1948 M-16 grain truck; 1949 2R17A fire truck; 1950 2R5 pickup; 1952 2R17A grain truck; 1952 Packard 200 4 door; 1955 E-38 grain truck; 1957 3E-40 flatbed; 1961 6E-28 grain truck; 1962 7E-13D 4x4 rack truck; 1962 7E-7 Champ pickup; 1962 GT Hawk 4 speed; 1963 8E-28 flatbed; 1964 Avanti R2 4 speed; 1964 Cruiser and various other "treasures" (including a 1959 IH B-120 4 wheel drive).

Hiding and preserving Studebakers in Richmond, Goochland & Louisa, Va.

studeclunker
05-28-2007, 03:33 PM
Attempting to tow my '56 Parkview up the driveway with my '62 Champ. Since a picture is worth a thousand words...

http://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b18/Studeclunker/the%20wreck/HPIM0296.jpg

studeclunker
05-28-2007, 03:33 PM
Attempting to tow my '56 Parkview up the driveway with my '62 Champ. Since a picture is worth a thousand words...

http://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b18/Studeclunker/the%20wreck/HPIM0296.jpg