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View Full Version : 63 Daytona convert-- Why drive them ?



JDP
05-03-2008, 04:50 PM
My convert was restored 10 years ago,then driven a total of 500 miles. It was advertised as being able to drive anywhere, but you would not have gone 5 miles. (Another reason to ship, even apparently nice cars.) I don't fault the owner, he knew everything was done only 500 miles ago, but did not account for the toll of time. As you ay recall, only one brake was working perfectly, it did not run smoothly,the top motor had gone south and more. Even after rebuilding the brakes it would pull hard on the front wheel that had the previously stuck wheel cylinder. After maybe 100 miles of driving, the brakes quit pulling, the engine ran better, and the transmission shifted smoother. BTW, I suspect the lining on the bad wheel was glazed and cleared up after some use.
The car has been on ebay for a day or so, and I've made the car my daily driver while the auction is running. Every day of the shake down cruise just makes the car a better driver. If you let your Studebaker sit, be prepared to redo a lot of work.

JDP/Maryland

sals54
05-03-2008, 04:55 PM
JP,
You have that right. Cars are not meant to sit. Its funny even about the electrical system. For some reason, when a car sits for a long time, the wires harden and crack and even the copper corrodes. If a car is driven, though, the same wiring, in the same amount of time does not crack, harden and corrode at the same rate of time. Wierd.

JDP
05-03-2008, 05:02 PM
Might be moisture related. If you drive a car, the air flow will dry everything out, plus you have that nice oil film from the engine.:) I've seen cars rust in odd places like the roof and cowl from wet debris that never dries out.

JDP/Maryland

studegary
05-05-2008, 03:16 PM
That is one of the reasons that I try to limit myself to one (or two) hobby vehicles at a time now. When I got up to ten vehicles, I found that I was just paying a lot of storage and could neither keep them all maintained nor enjoy using them all. This is my experience - probably doesn't apply to all.

Gary L.
Wappinger, NY

SDC member since 1968
Studebaker enthusiast much longer

bige
05-05-2008, 06:24 PM
I blame it on "Garage Gremlins". Pull it running fine, pull it out 5 months later, horn's not working, new heater valve is leaking etc. etc.

ErnieR

http://i146.photobucket.com/albums/r241/AvantiR2/track.jpg

go-studebaker
05-07-2008, 08:08 AM
Hi John,
It sounds like used car talk to me. Even the new owner of your car is going to want to fix something. I can only think of 1 car that actually was fine when I bought it, and that was my 1988 Avanti. All Studes, even restored ones need a little TLC every year.
There seems to be an idea in the collector car sales area that you never haver to service them because they dont do many miles, like your modern day driver might.
Studes are good reliable cars, and if it is just brakes and a few other minor things that need seeing to every 4 or 5 years then it is not too high a price to pay.

Greg


Greg Diffen
Australian Stude nut living in Warwick, United Kingdom

1933 St Regis Brougham Model 56 Dutch delivered
1937 Dicator sedan. Australian Body by TJ Richards
1939 Packard Seven Passenger monster UK delivered
1939 Commander Sedan Australian Body by TJ Richards
1939 Commander Swiss Cabriolet by Lagenthal
1961 Hawk
1963 Daytona Hardtop
1988 Avanti Convertible