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Son O Lark
04-30-2008, 05:01 AM
Gasoline prices just reached $3.75 a gallon here in Indy. Sadly no discount for Studebakers. I know because I asked!;) SB still in the plan for the weekend however![:p]

bams50
04-30-2008, 05:50 AM
Smae price here in CNY.

Last weekend it was about $3.65. In central PA last Sat. I paid $3.49, but price varied widely as I drove through the state.

I never complain about it. It costs what it costs, I need it, and that's that. Nothing I can do about it. But I do think harder about ways to combine trips. My weekly gas bill, business/personal combined, is now at about $350.



Robert (Bob) Andrews Owner- Studebakeracres- on the IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
Parish, central NY 13131

"Some people live for the rules, I live for exceptions"- 311

"With your Lark you're on your own, free as a bird, alive as a Lark. You've suddenly discovered that happiness is a thing called Larking!"

Avantidon
04-30-2008, 06:31 AM
It is becoming more and more of a problem with the predictions of $4.00 per gallon a reality by Memorial Day. Bob, from last Friday until this morning another 0.06 $ has been added to a gallon of gas in PA with the average now being $3.65.9. I am sure it will continue and like you we will be looking for ways to consolidate and conserve. I filled up two of my Studebakers last Friday and spent almost a $100.00 to do it. Maked me begin to wonder how much i will be driving outside of the area this summer. I guess I'll just have to wait and see what happens.

tomnoller
04-30-2008, 06:53 AM
I've been reading "The Worst Hard Time" - compelling stories about the Dust Bowl, and author Timothy Egan writes at the depths of the Depression a [u]barrel</u> of oil was selling for 10 cents! FWIW

Western Washington, USA

61hawk
04-30-2008, 08:03 AM
But in the 1930's how many people had vehicles, and those that did, how many drove more than 20-30 miles from home? Most in the country drove into town on Saturday night to do their shopping and sell eggs, cream, etc. Those who lived in town walked to the store. The price may be equivalent to today's prices, but the average driver I'm guessing used 2-3 gallons a week.

JRoberts
04-30-2008, 08:42 AM
quote:Originally posted by 61hawk

But in the 1930's how many people had vehicles, and those that did, how many drove more than 20-30 miles from home? Most in the country drove into town on Saturday night to do their shopping and sell eggs, cream, etc. Those who lived in town walked to the store. The price may be equivalent to today's prices, but the average driver I'm guessing used 2-3 gallons a week.


Yep, it was a different situation. Nowadays to buy almost anything you have to drive 3 to 5 miles. No corner grocery stores, dime stores, etc. Everything means transportation, other than by your own two feet.

And now that I moved about 15 miles out of town, we do have to plan our trips to town. A list is essential and I try to get several things done all at once, making the most out of my 30-40 mile trip.

Joe Roberts
'61 R1 Champ
'65 Cruiser
Editor of "The Down Easterner"
Eastern North Carolina Chapter

Roscomacaw
04-30-2008, 02:54 PM
Well Bob, that's nice that you can just blink and go. There's ALOT of folks who are REALLY feeling the crimp of these prices. I can't imagine deciding between food or the gas to go get it. But there's lotsa folks that have to sit down and figure what they can buy this week![V]

In spite of the fairly well-heeled ag industry owners here, the po folks that work and harvest the crops (Po because they're paid little so the farmer can keep his wife's luxury car filled and his Mega-PU truck's diesel engine throbbing, while the bed is empty and spotless. Oh - and so you can buy that half gallon of OJ for a fairly cheap price.)can't afford but old, tired, gas-thirsty cars and trucks to get to the fields and orchards with.

I DO find it satisfying that you guys are payin' a bit more than we do here (at the bargain stations where I buy anyway). Traditionally we've always been about 20+ cents higher than most other states.[^]

OK - I'm off to town to deliver Matthew's front bumper to the UPS store. Then do a bit of shopping on the rebound so as not to be wasteful with hundred and twenty dollar barrel of oil I'll be drawin' out of.:(

Miscreant Studebaker nut in California's central valley.

1957 Transtar 1/2ton
1960 Larkvertible V8
1958 Provincial wagon
1953 Commander coupe
1957 President two door

Tom B
04-30-2008, 03:24 PM
"hundred and twenty dollar barrel "

I think that's the problem, we're shipping our scrap steel to china, they are making barrels out of it to put oil in. They've got us over the barrel. If we could just get cheaper barrels. [all done tongue in cheek]

[img=left]http://www.alink.com/personal/tbredehoft/Bothcars4.jpg[/img=left]
Tom Bredehoft
'53 Commander Coupe
'55 President (6H Y6) State Sedan
(Under Construction) 197 hrs.
'05 Legacy Ltd Wagon
All Indiana built cars

Roscomacaw
04-30-2008, 03:33 PM
Dang! And me sendin' them that old 2E truck. Bunch 'o barrels there!

Let's not forget our once premium dollar's quickening shrinkage! That makes a barrel more expensive (to us) when it really isn't! Heh - our presidental hopefuls wanna give us 18 cents back. What a joke.[:o)]

Miscreant Studebaker nut in California's central valley.

1957 Transtar 1/2ton
1960 Larkvertible V8
1958 Provincial wagon
1953 Commander coupe
1957 President two door

hopinfox
04-30-2008, 04:03 PM
Its' sad the politians won't let us drill for oil in our own country. I looked and all my studes say made in USA!

M.hopinfox/Kennesaw,Ga.
62 Hawk
63 Champ
64 Commander
64 Hawk

ClaymoreWW
04-30-2008, 04:21 PM
To echo some of Mr Biggs' comments, I think there is a perspective that many overlook, especially by those of us that can afford many of life's luxuries.

Back in the day, when I was just starting out in this real world, the minimum wage was about $3.50 or so and gas was about $1 per gallon (forgive me if i get the values wrong - old age is creeping in! - I'm talking about 1979, 1980, somewhere in there). That puts the price of gas for the lowest wage-earners at about 1/3 of their hourly rate.

Today, minimum wage is around $7 (give or take, depending on the state you live in) and gas is rapidly approaching $4 per gallon. For the ratio to equate to what is was when I was a pup, it would need to be no more than $2 per gallon. Today we are at about 2/3 of the hourly wage.

To me, that is one of the easier measures of how gas prices can and do hurt. Remember, there are more people in this country less well-off than this group that can afford to have cars as a hobby. While we can make a call of whether a 200 mile trip for our hobby is worth it, Biggs is right - there are MANY people in this country that are starting to have to make choices between gas and necessities. In a country that has made itself car-centric, that is an eye-opener. Will we get to a point where people cannot afford to go to work in the traditional American way? If so, what will those people do? Most of the country does not have a public transit infrastructure.

One more eye-opener - the oil companies CONTINUE to post record profits. Maybe they raise the consumer prices faster than their costs raise?

--george


1963 Lark Daytona HT - 63V J8 175
http://www.teamwetworks.com/claymore/larkkey.jpg

JRoberts
04-30-2008, 04:40 PM
If the speculation bubble would burst the prices of oil would drop. I listened on the TV the other day to a couple of economists who said that supply and demand indicates that oil should be between 60 and 80 dollars a barrel. But speculators are willing to bet they will make a profit even if they pay 120 dollars a barrel. On top of that there is, as was mentioned earlier, the shrinking value of the dollar. Since then I have read and heard other economists saying the same thing. Despite what the oil executives say, the supply of oil is not so low as to cause the soaring prices in and of itself. Taxing the windfall profits might well just cause the oil companies to get even by raising the prices even further. Finally those that claim Americans should be ashamed because their demand for oil has not declined (thus supposedly causing the price of oil to increase) are not quite on track. As has been said here before, in this day and age you cannot just stop driving. Local neighborhoods are not self sufficient like they once were. You can't walk to school, the store, work, etc., like you could 50 years ago.

Joe Roberts
'61 R1 Champ
'65 Cruiser
Editor of "The Down Easterner"
Eastern North Carolina Chapter

Green53
04-30-2008, 04:52 PM
I just filled at Costco this morning in Glendale, AZ. Home of the 2010 International Meet. Reg unleaded $3.29.9 and premium $3.47.9.
Denny L

http://i243.photobucket.com/albums/ff85/Daytona64/53Stude2015.jpg

rockinhawk
04-30-2008, 05:30 PM
I don't pay much attention to the price of gas anymore since I bought a DIESEL!!! 4.35. NT


Neil Thornton
Hazlehurst, GA
'57 Silver Hawk
'56 Sky Hawk
'51 2R16 dump truck
Many others.
http://i81.photobucket.com/albums/j209/mbstude/avatar2.jpg

showbizkid
04-30-2008, 05:33 PM
quote:Originally posted by JRoberts

If the speculation bubble would burst the prices of oil would drop.


Joe, you are spot on. I have said for years that we should not allow oil and gas to be traded on the futures market. Like it or not, it's not a commodity anymore - it's a utility, and should be regulated as such.

Don't get me wrong - I'm not a "big government" kind of guy. But in this case, I'm all for 'em stepping in to fix this. No fair a bunch of guys on Wall Street getting fat off the rest of us just because they found a way to make greed legal.


[img=left]http://members.cox.net/clarknovak/lark.gif[/img=left]

Clark in San Diego
'63 F2/Lark Standard
http://studeblogger.blogspot.com
www.studebakersandiego.com

Roscomacaw
04-30-2008, 06:12 PM
hopinfox,

Don't fool yourself. If they popped holes all over Alaska and down the west coast - today... you'd be lucky to see a FEW PENNIES difference at the pumps. And that's assuming all this could be done instantly.

No matter WHAT WE (the USA) pumps, it all gets to be part of the world "pool" of oil. It's not gonna be ANY Cheaper or is there a guarantee it'd stay here at home. We'd have to be at war (a REAL one - not this contrived thing were playing at now) before our oil would be kept to home. And then just how cheap do you think it would be???
There's lots more I could say, but this is already flirting with going political and I won't be the one to push it there.

Miscreant Studebaker nut in California's central valley.

1957 Transtar 1/2ton
1960 Larkvertible V8
1958 Provincial wagon
1953 Commander coupe
1957 President two door

Lark Parker
04-30-2008, 07:30 PM
Here is a cost breakdown by the state of California:

http://www.energy.ca.gov/gasoline/margins/index.html

It is somewhat interesting to compare to the 1999 cost
breakdown available at the same site.

http://i108.photobucket.com/albums/n4/larkparker/Miscellaneous/caryreduced.jpg Lark Parker
If at first you don't succeed -- you will get a lot of advice.

rockne10
04-30-2008, 09:49 PM
No need to drill in the ANWR. A friend of mine, who's been a petroleum engineer for [u]THE</u> big oil company for years, tells me they have so many productive wells capped in Texas it would make your head spin. Fact is, bringing it in from outside is cheaper than paying American labor to turn the spigot in Texas.

To add insult to injury, to decrease our dependence on foreign oil, the major shareholders of Archer Daniels Midland (not to indicte anyone in our nation's capitol), which owns all the corn in the world, decide its a good idea to make ethynol from our food instead of our garbage.

Back to Studebaker talk, no ethynol in my car! I don't even buy chips cooked in corn oil or soda with corn syrup but, that's because my doctor discovered I am allergic to corn. Who'd have thunk? It used to be my favorite. Now, I'm partial to broccoli.

JRoberts
05-02-2008, 01:30 PM
quote:Originally posted by Mr.Biggs

hopinfox,

Don't fool yourself. If they popped holes all over Alaska and down the west coast - today... you'd be lucky to see a FEW PENNIES difference at the pumps. And that's assuming all this could be done instantly.

No matter WHAT WE (the USA) pumps, it all gets to be part of the world "pool" of oil. It's not gonna be ANY Cheaper or is there a guarantee it'd stay here at home. We'd have to be at war (a REAL one - not this contrived thing were playing at now) before our oil would be kept to home. And then just how cheap do you think it would be???
There's lots more I could say, but this is already flirting with going political and I won't be the one to push it there.

Miscreant Studebaker nut in California's central valley.

1957 Transtar 1/2ton
1960 Larkvertible V8
1958 Provincial wagon
1953 Commander coupe
1957 President two door




My bet is that if we began to drill in all of those places that the oil companies want us to, the OPEC countries would lower their production numbers and keeping the cost high.

Joe Roberts
'61 R1 Champ
'65 Cruiser
Editor of "The Down Easterner"
Eastern North Carolina Chapter

JRoberts
05-02-2008, 01:32 PM
quote:Originally posted by rockne10

No need to drill in the ANWR. A friend of mine, who's been a petroleum engineer for [u]THE</u> big oil company for years, tells me they have so many productive wells capped in Texas it would make your head spin. Fact is, bringing it in from outside is cheaper than paying American labor to turn the spigot in Texas.

To add insult to injury, to decrease our dependence on foreign oil, the major shareholders of Archer Daniels Midland (not to indicte anyone in our nation's capitol), which owns all the corn in the world, decide its a good idea to make ethynol from our food instead of our garbage.

Back to Studebaker talk, no ethynol in my car! I don't even buy chips cooked in corn oil or soda with corn syrup but, that's because my doctor discovered I am allergic to corn. Who'd have thunk? It used to be my favorite. Now, I'm partial to broccoli.


We can't burn broccoli in our tanks can we?

Joe Roberts
'61 R1 Champ
'65 Cruiser
Editor of "The Down Easterner"
Eastern North Carolina Chapter

JBOYLE
05-02-2008, 02:56 PM
quote:Originally posted by rockne10

No need to drill in the ANWR. A friend of mine, who's been a petroleum engineer for [u]THE</u> big oil company for years, tells me they have so many productive wells capped in Texas it would make your head spin. Fact is, bringing it in from outside is cheaper than paying American labor to turn the spigot in Texas.


That might be true BUT when I was a TV reporter in Texas, it was said that the wells were cappedin the 80s when oil imports were cheap.
It was said they would be uncapped if oil went above $40 a barrel.
It is now.:D
I wonder what the % of capped wells is now?

The state of Texas keeps track of this stuff...it's on the internet somewhere.

63 Avanti R1 2788
1914 Stutz Bearcat
(George Barris replica)

Washington State

bams50
05-02-2008, 03:06 PM
If we would get serious about our own oil and put the process in motion to go after it, the current suppliers would see the golden goose nearing death, and would be quick to lower their prices to take the incentive out of our own exploration. There's immediate help, and in the meantime the ongoing exploration and preparation would eventually lead to independence. Pretty simple solution, not so simple to get implemented.

In the meantime, I can't use a roller skate on my job or in my business. So I concentrate on working harder AND smarter, to make more money so I can "blink and go". I just hired another salesman to share hours in my business so we can be open more hours, 6 1/2 days per week. This week I increased my inventory from 20 to 35 units, and put more in our ad budget. This is a risk, but the plan is to take more market share based on lower prices/ higher volume, and more service (i.e. hours open). I'm not interested in deciding between gas and food, or being a po' folk. I know some folks, for various reasons, have no choice; but most of us do- and I know I do.

Opportunity is all over the place; it's just a matter of how much effort I want to put in. No need to steal or crook people- just put in the effort, is how I see it. So far, it has worked for me.



Robert (Bob) Andrews Owner- Studebakeracres- on the IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
Parish, central NY 13131

"Some people live for the rules, I live for exceptions"- 311

"With your Lark you're on your own, free as a bird, alive as a Lark. You've suddenly discovered that happiness is a thing called Larking!"

Swifster
05-02-2008, 03:25 PM
Most of our oil comes from Venezuela, Mexico and Canada. We see very few barrels coming out of the middle east. In oil producing nations, such as Venezuela (.45 cents) and Saudi Arabia (.35 cents) gas is dirt cheap. While some of this is due to labor costs, a good portion of this is due to the fact that they don't have to buy their oil on the open market. As far as I know, the US is not an Opec nation. And oil pumped at home doesn't have to be sold on the open market. Would the costs be as low as .35 cents? Nope, but the costs wouldn't be over $2.00.

Much of this lies at the foot of those we elect. The Republicans are beholden to big oil, and the Democrates want you to hug a tree and drive 60 MPG sh__boxes (shoebox [:o)]?). Much of this country is run on self interest and back room deals. I'd like to toss everyone out and start over. OK, off my soapbox...[xx(]

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Tom - Mulberry, FL

1964 Studebaker Daytona - 289 4V, 4-Speed (Cost To Date: $2125.60)

http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i280/Swifster/rollingpi.gif http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i280/Swifster/The%20Daytona%20File/Avatar%20Size/01-01-05TheStartingPoint.jpg http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i280/Swifster/The%20Daytona%20File/Avatar%20Size/07-17-07FrontClipRemoved.jpg http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i280/Swifster/The%20Daytona%20File/Avatar%20Size/04-11-08CoolingFan.jpg

JBOYLE
05-02-2008, 03:32 PM
quote:Originally posted by Swifster
Much of this lies at the foot of those we elect. The Republicans are beholden to big oil, and the Democrates want you to hug a tree and drive 60 MPG sh__boxes (shoebox [:o)]?).

Just to be fair...Don't forget, the Deomcrats are equally beholding to the environmentalists and their (often) rich liberal friends.

Those are the people who won't let the US drill for some of the oil it has...off-shore and ANWAR or let any new refineries be built...while still having private jets and multiple homes (in other words the idiots you see on Entertainment Tonight saying how "green" they are).

They don't care about some guy driving a truck to feed his family. They sold out years ago to the actors, college profs and welfare croud.

63 Avanti R1 2788
1914 Stutz Bearcat
(George Barris replica)

Washington State

bams50
05-02-2008, 03:45 PM
Come on, guys, no matter how correct you are, you're off into politics. Let's not get a lock snapped on here.

I'm just saying, it's all too common to use up all our energy being mad at things we can't do anything about, when it would be better used making lemonade out of the lemons.



Robert (Bob) Andrews Owner- Studebakeracres- on the IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
Parish, central NY 13131

"Some people live for the rules, I live for exceptions"- 311

"With your Lark you're on your own, free as a bird, alive as a Lark. You've suddenly discovered that happiness is a thing called Larking!"

JBOYLE
05-02-2008, 04:37 PM
To avoid politics...here are some facts...

Texas oil production figures from the state, see for yourself:
http://www.rrc.state.tx.us/divisions/og/statistics/production/ogisopwc.html

1976 160,000 wells produced 1.15 billion barrels
1985 210,000 wells produced 830 million barrels
2006 151,000 wells produced 340 million barrels

Despite rumors & stories...The # of wells has [u]only</u> dropped 25% from its peak, but oil production is down by about 60%.

End of story, not as much oil as before...sorry conspiracy buffs.

63 Avanti R1 2788
1914 Stutz Bearcat
(George Barris replica)

Washington State

bkz81
05-03-2008, 01:23 AM
Technology is going to change those numbers though. Such as steam injection that lets these companies tap into reserves that they did not know existed back then, or if they did, they didn't know how to extract them. All this political talk makes me sick. Dosen't matter what party is in office, we still get screwed. It's like joining a gang how loyal everyone is to their party. Here is some food for thought. Why do we only have 2 relevant parties and Britain has about 10 to 15 during election, each as important as the last.