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PackardV8
04-25-2008, 01:11 PM
Greetings, SDCers.

Fifty years of Studebaker ownership and still getting ambushed by those darned big hoods! My first hard lesson was in 1962. My '56 Flight Hawk, built with what we now know to be a criminally unsafe latch design, unlatched on a hard bump at speed and folded the hood back over the roof. Under the wrong circumstances, that could have been fatal. Fortunately, it was a country road with no other traffic and I was able to keep my wits about me and brake hard without turning the wheel.

My most recent lesson learned was with my '55 pickup. Getting it ready for spring driving, I rolled it out, changed the oil and put the battery on the charger. The hood was naturally open on the prop rod while the oil was draining and the battery was charging. A gust of wind lifted the heavy hood enough to raise the prop rod out of the hole in the radiator core support. The hood then dropped onto the battery charger, putting a small ding in the heretofore pristine paint. I would have much rather it had fallen on my head. [xx(]

Moral of the story - Don't spit into the wind and don't park your Studes facing into the wind with the hoods raised, either!

thnx, jack vines.

PackardV8

curt
04-25-2008, 02:28 PM
Yesterday I drove my 1955 Persident from Seminole,OK to Liberal KS ,a distance of 345 miles. Wimds were, I bet 35 to 45 mph. They were cross winds on a two lane higkway with a speed limit of 65mph. I drove 60 mph. When the big cattle trucks coming towards me passed, they were doing all of 65mph. One time I think the car was 'blown on' so hard I could see the hood try to lift , the fenders and roof seemed to move. The Studebaker just kept going straight ahead with a little stearing adjustment. I did notice a loose piece of chrome after the run, it's not loose any more. The hood latch held yesterday in extreme winds.High yesterday was 91 degrees with a low of 46 this AM.

62champ
04-25-2008, 02:55 PM
quote:Originally posted by PackardV8


A gust of wind lifted the heavy hood enough to raise the prop rod out of the hole in the radiator core support. The hood then dropped onto the battery charger, putting a small ding in the heretofore pristine paint. I would have much rather it had fallen on my head. [xx(]

thnx, jack vines.

PackardV8


I have heard of a similar incident, but when the hood came down on the Studebaker pickup, the prop rod punched a hole in the core of the radiator [:0]



<div align="left">1960 Lark VI</div id="left"> <div align="right">1962 7E7-122</div id="right">
[img=left]http://i96.photobucket.com/albums/l163/62champ/car/8b0ac4c6.jpg[/img=left]
[img=right]http://i96.photobucket.com/albums/l163/62champ/car/DSC02237.jpg[/img=right]

OzarkPetunia
04-25-2008, 03:04 PM
So... being the proud new owner of a '56 Flight Hawk (with a criminally unsafe hood latch) that's within a week or so of being roadworthy again, does anyone have a decent picture or a super-detailed description of the cotter pin "fix" to secure the hood?

THANKS!
Rose

Fayetteville, AR

DEEPNHOCK
04-25-2008, 03:04 PM
I have a new Ford 500.
The hood does a 'flutter' every time I pass a semi.
You'd think it was going to rip loose and fly open.
(It's also held up with a prop rod)..
So, if you are going to lay the criminal part on the old Stude designers,
be aware that they have served their term, and are out in public again:(.
Jeff[8D]

http://i77.photobucket.com/albums/j54/deepnhock/1937CEBearfootingArtwithLabelgif-1.jpg http://www.racingstudebakers.com/avatar_01.jpg http://community.webshots.com/user/deepnhock

61hawk
04-25-2008, 03:23 PM
quote:Originally posted by OzarkPetunia

So... being the proud new owner of a '56 Flight Hawk (with a criminally unsafe hood latch) that's within a week or so of being roadworthy again, does anyone have a decent picture or a super-detailed description of the cotter pin "fix" to secure the hood?

THANKS!
Rose

Fayetteville, AR


I don't have pictures handy, but it is pretty simple if I remember the steps correctly:
1: Raise hood
2: Push the spring around the hood pin up above the triangle shaped tip.
3: Clamp a vice grip on the pin to hold the spring above the triangle shaped tip.
4: Drill a hole through the center portion of the tip from side-to-side.
5: Remove vice grip, close hood, and insert clip.

We used a piece of vinyl covered cable to keep the clip connected to the car for the times when the hood is up.

Lee

blackhawk61
04-25-2008, 03:39 PM
Here You go !
http://i133.photobucket.com/albums/q55/chevpartsman/Hoodlatchpin1.jpg

1961 Hawk 4BC,4-SPEED,TT
http://i133.photobucket.com/albums/q55/chevpartsman/61HawkChevypartsmanreduce.jpg
Ken Byrd
Lewisville,NC

DEEPNHOCK
04-25-2008, 04:18 PM
And I thought nose rings in chick's were ugly[:0]
But... If it works!;)
Jeff[8D]


quote:Originally posted by blackhawk61

Here You go !

61hawk
04-25-2008, 04:25 PM
quote:Originally posted by DEEPNHOCK

And I thought nose rings in chick's were ugly[:0]
But... If it works!;)
Jeff[8D]


quote:Originally posted by blackhawk61

Here You go !



Yeah but to see this you either have to be laying down or in the process of getting run over by the car to see it. It's like having ugly mufflers on the car.

OzarkPetunia
04-25-2008, 05:12 PM
Thanks for the instructions AND picture! Another "to do" added to the list.

:D

Fayetteville, AR

Chucks Stude
04-25-2008, 05:27 PM
That pin is in stock at Tractor Supply. Works like a charm.

Guido
04-25-2008, 05:48 PM
quote:Originally posted by Chucks Stude

That pin is in stock at Tractor Supply. They are called lynch pins.

http://thumb14.webshots.net/t/63/663/9/36/86/2567936860097493054TXiheL_th.jpgGuido Salvage - "Where rust is beautiful" and real Studebaker horsepower lives

See pictures here: http://community.webshots.com/user/GuidoSalvage

Hiding and preserving Studebakers in Richmond, Goochland & Louisa, Va.

56H-Y6
04-25-2008, 06:17 PM
Hi
This applies to the C-K and Hawk models, is it also necessary to do this modification to the '53-'58 sedans? I don't recall the '57 President I had having any problem with the hood staying stable in high winds.
Steve

sals54
04-25-2008, 07:31 PM
I've been driving my 54 Coupe for over 30 years and have always used a secondary safety catch on my hood. I've come home a few times to find that the hood had sprung from the stock latch only to be caught by the safety catch. A few times over 30 years has probably saved me from having to buy a couple of hoods over the years.
Rewind to last summer. Ugh. I had shown a friend something under my hood and dropped it closed. We went on to other stuff. The next day I went out for an evening of cruising. I had been out for an hour or so and made a U turn to go home. I got on it a bit to really feel the burn through the gears. Just as I hit about 65mph...WHAM!!!, the hood shot up so fast I thought I was auditioning for Tommy Boy. I was so mad, it was all I could do to not jump up and down on the hood. I had to pace up and down the sidewalk for a half hour before I could even try to figure out how to close the hood and get it home. I used a piece of concrete to smash the hood into some vague appearance of its former self just to get it to close. I had finally stopped my cursing rampage enough to allow myself to drive home. My wife had already called me and I could not even talk to her. Well, I found that I had neglected to engage the safety catch on the hood the evening before. What a dufus. One hood in over 30 years, is OK I guess. As I had a primo extra hood at the time was a little bit of consolation. Now the only replacement I have is fiberglass. Better than nothing though. USE A SECONDARY SAFETY CATCH ON ALL COUPES AND HARDTOPS.! ! ! ! ! !

rodnutrandy
04-25-2008, 08:17 PM
Please advise me! Is this a problem with M series pickups? My hood is in body shop right now getting straightened and painted. I would be a little more than upset if hood folded over cab after spending nearly 7 years to get the truck on the road. And if pin is needed, how could you reach it with a m truck? THANKS for any Info!!!!!

Randy Wilkin
1946 M5 Streetrod
Hillsboro,Ohio 45133

MikeW
04-26-2008, 12:11 PM
I have a Chapman style secondary lock on my hood. I don't know if it would hold in a real high speed lift but on one occasion when I did not get the hood totally latched it held the hood down for about 100 miles. I did not even note the hood was not correctly latched till I tried to open it upon returning home. This is the style that has the cable running to a lock under the dash. You just push in on the button to slide an underhood latch in place. I initally put it on to keep the hood locked when the car was parked. I actually purchased it from JC Whipme.

Mike
www.packardhawk.com

STEWDI
04-27-2008, 12:15 AM
In our chapter, we've had a few C/K flying hood stories, but I don't recall hearing about the phenomenon in reference to other models.

It's doubtful whether a stock M5 could get going fast enough to have any flutter - not even the owner's heat rate (unless he's thinking of how many RPM's the Champion engine is singing at with that 4.82:1 rear end):)

Roger "153624" Hill

55 Champion
47 M-5
Izzer Buggy
Junior Wagon

mbstude
04-27-2008, 10:10 AM
Jack, the same thing happened to me with my '59. I opened the hood for something, and the wind caught it and nearly took it out of my hands before I could get the prop rod down. Thankfully, I managed to hold it and it didn't wrap over the roof.

I did go to close the hood once, and the prop rod wasn't in the little clip, and it came back down, right through the radiator core.

There's not much chance of an M series hood flying up. Looking at our M5, it doesn't seem like that would be a problem. [^]

[b]Matthew Burnette
Hazlehurst, GA
http://i81.photobucket.com/albums/j209/mbstude/avatar-9.jpg

cjsteak
04-27-2008, 11:20 AM
Anyone have a newer Jeep Wrangler? I had an '03 Rubicon... I was nervous the first month I had it watching the hood flutter around on the highway. Once the rubber hood catches wear out, they give about a 1/2 inch of free play. Those hoods REALLY dance on the highway, especially when being passed by big trucks.

Chris Salisbury
Hutto/Austin, TX

1958 Commander Starlight Hardtop

Dick Steinkamp
04-27-2008, 11:31 AM
IMHO the biggest problem with Stude hood latches is poor maintenance on the part of the owners [:0]. The latch design isn't that bad. Worn parts (due to lack of lubricant), and poorly adjusted latches are the more likely culprits.

If the parts are good, and the latches are adjusted correctly and well lubed, I can't see how a bump or wind can release it. And if it does release (perhaps the hood wasn't fully closed), the safety catch is more than adequate to prevent the hood from ending up in the windshield.

With that said, there is certainly nothing wrong with a THIRD catch like Ken posted, or even the use of a bungie cord for additional piece of mind.

One more thing...I would never leave the hood up and unattended on a Studebaker with a prop rod (like at a car show). A gust of wind can come up, raise the hood, release the prop rod, and result in some nasty damage.
http://i149.photobucket.com/albums/s66/ddstnkmp/54%20starlight/HiResS2Dsig2.jpg

Pat Dilling
04-27-2008, 03:30 PM
Dick, That is exactly what happened to mine, though not at a car show. When the wind lifted it off the prop rod, the rod fell, then the wind let go of the hood. The wind, not being experienced closing Studebaker hoods, did not know to push it back as it was lowered. The result was a nasty crease across the middle of my hood. Since then I have picked up a lucite rod that supports the hood in a much lower position for display at car shows. Not only does this give the hood a lower center of gravity, it also enhances the profile of the car when on display. People are still able to view the engine compartment well enough. I still leave the hood closed if the wind is blowing and open it by request so I can keep a firm grip on it.

Pat

Pat Dilling
Olivehurst, CA
Custom '53 Starlight aka Stu Cool

Dick Steinkamp
04-27-2008, 03:40 PM
quote:Originally posted by Pat Dilling

Dick, That is exactly what happened to mine, though not at a car show. When the wind lifted it off the prop rod, the rod fell, then the wind let go of the hood. The wind, not being experienced closing Studebaker hoods, did not know to push it back as it was lowered. The result was a nasty crease across the middle of my hood. Since then I have picked up a lucite rod that supports the hood in a much lower position for display at car shows. Not only does this give the hood a lower center of gravity, it also enhances the profile of the car when on display. People are still able to view the engine compartment well enough. I still leave the hood closed if the wind is blowing and open it by request so I can keep a firm grip on it.



That lucite rod is a good idea. [^]

...but my next rant ;) is on the supposed need to "pull" a Stude hood out when you open it and "push" it in when you close it. Again, with proper maintenance (lubrication), parts that aren't worn, and with the correct springs in place, this is not necessary. A Stude hood SHOULD open just by pulling "up" on it and close by pushing "down". The hinge mechanism and springs should should do the rest of the work. If not...they need attention.

JRoberts
04-27-2008, 03:53 PM
I remember a few years ago when our chapter attended a big multi-make car show. One of the rules for judging was that the hoods had to be up. This was a very windy spring day, and it was obvious that hoods with prop rods were going to become dangerous. Lots of solutions, most of which looked tenuous and best, included bungie cars and tie down straps. I found somebody who knew the meet officials and they had a discussion and it was eventually decided that the open hood rule could be waived if somebody was near by to open the hood when judges asked.

A few years ago we had a member who made plastic coated cables with loops at both ends these were used as hood safety latches. My several members still have those devices and use them regularly.

I know that several folks say as does Dick that the latches on C-K's are perfectly fine if maintained well, but it seems to me that the vast history of their failure might indicate otherwise. Now , I admit I don't have a lot of history with those body styles, but there are just too many bent hood corners and slightly flat spots above windshields of these cars for the problem to solely be that of the operators/owners. I'd rather be safe than sorry.

Joe Roberts
'61 R1 Champ
'65 Cruiser
Editor of "The Down Easterner"
Eastern North Carolina Chapter